Mark Memmott

Mark Memmott is NPR's supervising senior editor for Standards & Practices. In that role, he's a resource for NPR's journalists – helping them raise the right questions as they do their work and uphold the organization's standards.

As the NPR Ethics Handbook states, the Standards & Practices editor is "charged with cultivating an ethical culture throughout our news operation. This means he or she coordinates regular training and discussion on how we apply our principles and monitors our decision-making practices to ensure we're living up to our standards."

Before becoming Standards & Practices editor, Memmott was one of the hosts of NPR's "The Two-Way" news blog, which he helped to launch when he came to NPR in 2009. It focuses on breaking news, analysis, and the most compelling stories being reported by NPR News and other news media.

Prior to joining NPR, Memmott worked for nearly 25 years as a reporter and editor at USA Today. He focused on a range of coverage from politics, foreign affairs, economics, and the media. He reported from places across the United States and the world, including half a dozen trips to Afghanistan in 2002-2003.

During his time at USA Today, Memmott, helped launch and lead three USAToday.com news blogs: "On Deadline," "The Oval" and "On Politics," the site's 2008 presidential campaign blog.

(This post was last updated at 5:45 p.m. ET.)

An already dangerous, volatile situation turned even deadlier early Monday in Cairo when dozens of people were killed at a protest outside the Republican Guard facility where it's believed ousted President Mohammed Morsi is being held. Most of those who died are reported to have been among a large group of Morsi's supporters.

Update at 5:45 p.m. ET. Date Set For Egypt's Election

Two people died Saturday in the crash-landing at San Francisco International Airport of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 from Seoul, South Korea, San Francisco's fire chief says.

Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White says everyone who had been on board the flight is accounted for.

National Transportation Safety Board chairwoman Debbie Hersman said investigators were being deployed to the scene.

"Obviously, we have a lot of work to do," she said, noting that it was too early to tell what had caused the crash.

At least one person has died, CTV News reports, after a freight train pulling tank cars full of crude oil exploded early Saturday in a small Quebec town about 160 miles east of Montreal.

(Click here for our most recent updates.)

The office of the interim Egyptian president is now backtracking on reports of the appointment of Mohamed ElBaradei as prime minister. NPR's Leila Fadel reports this comes "after the second-largest Islamist party in Egypt [Salfi el-Nour], which has so far been on board with the military coup, reportedly rejected the appointment."

Sunday brings a sad memory for the family of Aaron Collins. It marks one year since the 30-year-old Kentucky man died.

But the heart warming story of "Aaron's last wish" continues.

Marion Bartoli of France won the women's singles title at Wimbledon on Saturday, defeating Germany's Sabine Lisicki in straight sets, 6-1, 6-4.

It's Bartoli's first "Grand Slam" title.

Sports Illustrated was posting "live analysis" through the match. At the end, it wrote that:

There's very disturbing news from Nigeria:

"At least 29 pupils and a teacher have been killed in a pre-dawn attack by suspected Islamists on a school in northeastern Nigeria, reports say." (BBC News)

The BBC's Will Ross, reporting from Lagos, adds that "it sounds like a horrific attack." Survivors say the gunmen set fire to buildings. Some of the students were burned alive, he reports, while "others were shot as they tried to run away."

Update at 9:22 p.m. ET. Snowden Reveals Documents On Brazil:

Amid requests and offers of asylum in Latin America, Edward Snowden has apparently released documents showing that the U.S. spied on millions of emails and phone calls of Brazilians. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro tells our Newscast Desk the report, published in the Rio de Janeiro paper O Globo, was co-written by Glenn Greenwald, who has been covering the National Security Agency's programs.

(We most recently updated the top of this post at 2:05 p.m. ET.)

The death toll from clashes Friday and into early Saturday in Egypt now stands at 36, authorities say. That estimate, released just before 11 a.m. ET, was up from the 30 deaths that had been reported when the day began.

One word came to mind this week when we saw the stories about Texas physical education teacher Dale Irby and how he had worn the same "groovy shirt and sweater vest" for every school photo in the past 40 years:

Awesome.

Before we explore his awesomeness, though, here's some background.

Update at 5:50 p.m. ET. The prosecution concluded its case Friday in the trial of George Zimmerman. Afterward, the judge denied a request by the defense to acquit Zimmerman of second-degree murder. The defense had argued that the prosecution had failed to prove its case against him.

Our original post:

There were some terrifying moments Thursday night at the July 4th fireworks celebration in Simi Valley, Calif.

As videos from the scene show, something went wrong and a large number of the explosives detonated much too close to the ground. One such video is posted here.

More jobs were created last month than economists had expected, but the unemployment rate held steady.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday that employers added 195,000 jobs to public and private payrolls. That's better than the gain of 165,000 that forecasters had predicted.

Pope John Paul II will be made a saint, the Vatican announced Friday, according to Reuters and other news outlets, including Italy's La Repubblica.

(Click here for updates.)

After ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi's supporters in the Muslim Brotherhood called for mass protests Friday, there were reports of violence in the streets of Cairo and some other cities.

The good news from the National Weather Service:

"The Western U.S. will begin to cool on Wednesday after several days of record-high temperatures. Temperatures will still be hot in many locations, but will be closer to normal for this time of year."

The not-so-good news if you're in the Southeast and have outdoor plans on Independence Day:

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