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StoryCorps
5:06 am
Fri July 3, 2015

For A Medal Of Honor Recipient, Wounds Of War Lingered Into Fatherhood

Yvette Benavidez Garcia and her husband, Rene, dropped by the StoryCorps studios to reminisce about Yvette's father, Roy, a Medal of Honor recipient whose daring rescue mission in Vietnam cast ripples into his later life as a father.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 7:33 am

On his second tour of duty in Vietnam, Master Sgt. Roy P. Benavidez embarked on a daring rescue. The mission that he spearheaded saved the lives of eight fellow soldiers — but also left Benavidez himself riddled and bleeding, shot 37 times.

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Music
3:04 pm
Thu July 2, 2015

Your Road-Trip Playlist Is Ready

Turn up the car radio and hit the highway with the newly completed All Things Considered road-trip playlist.
DutchScenery iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 6:35 pm

With the holiday weekend coming up, All Things Considered has just the playlist for your road-tripping needs. We asked listeners to tell us what songs they consider essential fuel for long summer drives, and more than 3,000 suggestions rolled in. Now, we've whittled the list down to a mix of 99 songs, including the one you recommended most frequently: Golden Earring's "Radar Love."

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It's All Politics
12:13 pm
Wed July 1, 2015

Can The Candidate Move Beyond 'The Christie Show'?

A supporter at Gov. Chris Christie's announcement Tuesday.
Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 7:06 am

It was the least suspenseful cliffhanger in the history of cliffs.

Governor Christie has, essentially, been running for higher office for years. But as of Tuesday he is now, officially, a presidential candidate.

This week the Christie Tracker podcast, from WNYC and New Jersey Public Radio, headed to Livingston High School for analysis on the announcement.

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Music Interviews
6:48 pm
Sun June 28, 2015

The Sound Of Twin Danger: Frank Sinatra Meets The Clash

Twin Danger's Vanessa Bley and Stuart Matthewman
Sunny Khalsa Courtesy of the artist

Cocktail jazz isn't a sound you hear very much in pop music these days. But a duo known as Twin Danger is causing a scene with their self-titled debut album and live shows.

It's a familiar mood for saxophonist Stuart Matthewman; he co-wrote many of the biggest hits for Sade, like "No Ordinary Love" and "Your Love Is King."

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U.S.
5:54 pm
Sun June 28, 2015

After Marriage Equality, What's Next For The LGBT Movement?

A crowd waves rainbow flags during the Heritage Pride March in New York on Sunday.
Kathy Willens AP

Originally published on Mon June 29, 2015 2:24 pm

Amid celebrations about the Supreme Court's decision legalizing gay marriage, some within the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community are also raising concerns about what may lie ahead for them.

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Author Interviews
10:00 am
Sun June 28, 2015

Two Years After Deadly Wildfire, Are There Lessons In The Ashes?

An aerial view shows the Yarnell Hill fire burning June 29, 2013 near the town of Yarnell, Ariz. The next day, 19 firefighters died battling the blaze.
Arizona State Forestry Division Getty Images

Two years ago, a wildfire was raging in the foothills of North Arizona. The Granite Mountain Hotshots, a team of elite firefighters from Prescott, Ariz., were on the ground, battling the blaze.

Then the weather and the winds shifted, and the two-day-old Yarnell Hill Fire changed course. The commander had a huge decision to make: stay on safe ground, or try to cut off the blaze?

He made the call — and before the day was over, 19 hotshot firefighters were dead. It was one of the deadliest incidents for wildland firefighters in U.S. history.

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NPR Story
8:17 am
Sun June 28, 2015

2 Brothers And A Team Of Mules Tackle The Historic Oregon Trail

The Oregon Trail looms large in the American imagination. But journalist Rinker Buck and his brother Nick set out to see what the experience was really like — miseries and all.
Albert Bierstadt Public Domain

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 9:40 am

Two 21st-century guys, a replica 19th-century wagon, some mules and a resolution: to re-live the Oregon Trail today.

Rivers, mountains, cliffs, runaway mules, cars and trucks, bad weather ... What could possibly go wrong?

Journalist Rinker Buck wanted to find out. He and his brother Nick hitched a covered wagon to mules and set off to retrace what's left of the westward path traveled by thousands of 19th-century pioneers.

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Author Interviews
5:19 am
Sun June 28, 2015

Raised By 5 Different Families, 7 Siblings Are Reunited In 'Bastards'

Courtest W.W. Norton & Company

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 10:44 am

Mary Anna King grew up in a housing project in southern New Jersey, with her older brother Jacob and struggling parents.

"When you're struggling financially and you're living in poverty ... it takes twice as much effort to do anything," she tells NPR's Eric Westervelt.

Her parents went on to have five more kids, all girls, and despite her mother's best efforts to keep the family together, all five girls were ultimately given up for adoption.

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Governing
5:36 pm
Sat June 27, 2015

For Families Of U.S. Hostages, New Policy May Bring New Hope

Linda Boyle (left) and Lyn Coleman hold a photo of their children, who were kidnapped in Afghanistan in 2012. Caitlan Coleman, an American married to Canadian Joshua Boyle, was pregnant when the couple was abducted.
Bill Gorman AP

Originally published on Sat June 27, 2015 6:36 pm

More than 80 Americans have been taken hostage abroad since Sept. 11, 2001. Currently, 30 Americans are being held around the world.

Until this week, the families of those hostages would have faced the threat of prosecution from the U.S. government for trying to pay a ransom to kidnappers.

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Book News & Features
5:26 pm
Sat June 27, 2015

Marvel's Half-Black, Half-Latino Spider-Man Is Going Mainstream

Marvel has put half-African-American, half-Latino teen Miles Morales in the Spider-Man suit.
Courtesy of Marvel

Originally published on Sat June 27, 2015 6:36 pm

Step aside, Peter Parker: There's a new Spider-Man joining the Marvel Universe.

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National Security
5:12 pm
Sat June 27, 2015

Embraced Yet Forbidden, Staff Sergeant Comes Out As Transgender

Staff Sgt. Patricia King, who has been in the Army for 16 years, says she decided to start her gender transition in January.
Christian Murdock Colorado Springs Gazette

Originally published on Wed July 1, 2015 4:00 pm

By serving in the Army, Staff Sgt. Patricia King is breaking the rules.

King enlisted 1999 under her birth name, Peter. At the beginning of this year, King — a decorated soldier with three deployments to Afghanistan under her belt — started her gender transition.

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Music Interviews
5:12 pm
Sat June 27, 2015

'I Just Love Dirt': Bilal Gets Grungy In The Studio

Bilal's latest album is In Another Life.
Kawai Matthews Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat June 27, 2015 6:36 pm

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Author Interviews
5:12 pm
Sat June 27, 2015

How To Win The Money Game: A Former NBA Star Shares Financial Advice

Adonal Foyle (center) plays for the Orlando Magic against the Milwaukee Bucks in 2007.
Doug Benc Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 27, 2015 7:38 pm

According to Sports Illustrated, more than half of all NBA players are broke within five years of retirement. Most of the players come into professional sports totally unequipped to handle their own windfalls like cars, houses and fancy clothes.

Former NBA star Adonal Foyle is trying to help.

He offers financial advice for current and future professional athletes in his book Winning the Money Game: Lessons Learned from the Financial Fouls of Pro Athletes.

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Around the Nation
8:11 am
Sat June 27, 2015

National Cathedral Should Not Be Stained With Confederate Flag, Dean Says

A glass window at Washington National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., shows Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. The dean of the cathedral has called for its removal.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 27, 2015 10:30 am

The Confederate stars and bars have been taken down from flagpoles and store shelves all over the country this week. Calls for their removal follow the June 17 shooting of nine people at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C.

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Music
2:03 am
Sat June 27, 2015

Dale Watson: Call Him Insane, But Don't Call Him Country

Dale Watson's new album, Call Me Insane, is out now.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat June 27, 2015 10:30 am

With a silver pompadour and a belt-busting baritone that delivers songs about heartbreak and honky-tonking, Texas musician Dale Watson is straight country — but he doesn't necessarily want you to say so.

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Music Interviews
6:34 pm
Fri June 26, 2015

'There's No Box For Me': Miguel On Embracing Difference

Wildheart is the follow-up to Miguel's 2012 breakout album, Kaleidoscope Dream.
Daniel Sannwald

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 9:20 pm

On his last album, Miguel sang songs that swooned with the emotion of a first kiss. Wildheart, the new album by the Grammy-winning R&B artist, takes things a little further. While that sleek mix of bass, synths and soul that powered his 2012 breakout remains, the songwriting on Wildheart takes a much more personal, introspective approach.

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StoryCorps
5:04 am
Fri June 26, 2015

Charleston Stirs Memories Of Young Birmingham Bombing Victim

Gwen Moten remembers her childhood friend, Denise McNair, who died with three other girls in the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Ala., in 1963.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 6:01 pm

Fifty-one years before the deadly shootings at a church in Charleston, S.C., there was another infamous attack on a Southern black church. The 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., was bombed by the Ku Klux Klan on Sept. 15, 1963.

Four young girls were murdered. Cynthia Wesley, Carole Robertson and Addie Mae Collins were each 14 years old. Denise McNair was 11. Gwen Moten was best friends with Denise.

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Music Interviews
4:28 pm
Wed June 24, 2015

Pop Singer Tori Kelly's 'Unbreakable Smile' Keeps Her Optimistic

Tori Kelly
Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Wed June 24, 2015 8:01 pm

Singer Tori Kelly is an unapologetic optimist about love, her image and her music. At the ripe old age of 22, she's been at the edges of the music business for a long time. She started singing when she was just 3 years old, and at age 11, she took her powerful, mature voice on the TV show America's Most Talented Kid -- and won.

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Music Interviews
2:03 am
Wed June 24, 2015

New Documentary Finds Nina Simone 'In Between The Black And White Keys'

The documentary What Happened, Miss Simone? explores Nina Simone's rich and complicated life.
Courtesy of Peter Rodis/Netflix

Originally published on Mon June 29, 2015 6:34 pm

Even those who didn't live through Nina Simone's heyday can recognize her songs, or at least her voice. Born Eunice Waymon, the passionate performer and activist died in 2003, and today her recordings still loom larger than the rest of her story.

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Television
6:18 pm
Sun June 21, 2015

The Human Drama Of Hacking Fuels TV Thriller 'Mr. Robot'

USA's Mr. Robot tells the story of a cyber-security engineer and vigilant hacker (played by Rami Malek) who also suffers from anxiety.
Sarah Shatz USA Network

Originally published on Mon June 22, 2015 10:13 am

Cyborgs and androids are nowhere to be seen in the new USA show Mr. Robot. Instead, the drama is centered on a very human interior — the mind of Elliot, the unlikely hacker hero. From his first words — "Hello, friend" — his voice-over keeps audiences squarely inside his world.

"Elliot is sort of an internal, isolated guy who can't really interact with people socially, in real life, but online he can hack them and knows all the intimate, private details of them," Sam Esmail, the show's creator and executive producer, tells NPR's Arun Rath.

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