NPR Staff

Pages

Book News & Features
5:26 pm
Sat June 27, 2015

Marvel's Half-Black, Half-Latino Spider-Man Is Going Mainstream

Marvel has put half-African-American, half-Latino teen Miles Morales in the Spider-Man suit.
Courtesy of Marvel

Originally published on Sat June 27, 2015 6:36 pm

Step aside, Peter Parker: There's a new Spider-Man joining the Marvel Universe.

Read more
National Security
5:12 pm
Sat June 27, 2015

Embraced Yet Forbidden, Staff Sergeant Comes Out As Transgender

Staff Sgt. Patricia King, who has been in the Army for 16 years, says she decided to start her gender transition in January.
Christian Murdock Colorado Springs Gazette

Originally published on Wed July 1, 2015 4:00 pm

By serving in the Army, Staff Sgt. Patricia King is breaking the rules.

King enlisted 1999 under her birth name, Peter. At the beginning of this year, King — a decorated soldier with three deployments to Afghanistan under her belt — started her gender transition.

Read more
Music Interviews
5:12 pm
Sat June 27, 2015

'I Just Love Dirt': Bilal Gets Grungy In The Studio

Bilal's latest album is In Another Life.
Kawai Matthews Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat June 27, 2015 6:36 pm

Read more
Author Interviews
5:12 pm
Sat June 27, 2015

How To Win The Money Game: A Former NBA Star Shares Financial Advice

Adonal Foyle (center) plays for the Orlando Magic against the Milwaukee Bucks in 2007.
Doug Benc Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 27, 2015 7:38 pm

According to Sports Illustrated, more than half of all NBA players are broke within five years of retirement. Most of the players come into professional sports totally unequipped to handle their own windfalls like cars, houses and fancy clothes.

Former NBA star Adonal Foyle is trying to help.

He offers financial advice for current and future professional athletes in his book Winning the Money Game: Lessons Learned from the Financial Fouls of Pro Athletes.

Read more
Around the Nation
8:11 am
Sat June 27, 2015

National Cathedral Should Not Be Stained With Confederate Flag, Dean Says

A glass window at Washington National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., shows Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. The dean of the cathedral has called for its removal.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 27, 2015 10:30 am

The Confederate stars and bars have been taken down from flagpoles and store shelves all over the country this week. Calls for their removal follow the June 17 shooting of nine people at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C.

Read more
Music
2:03 am
Sat June 27, 2015

Dale Watson: Call Him Insane, But Don't Call Him Country

Dale Watson's new album, Call Me Insane, is out now.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat June 27, 2015 10:30 am

With a silver pompadour and a belt-busting baritone that delivers songs about heartbreak and honky-tonking, Texas musician Dale Watson is straight country — but he doesn't necessarily want you to say so.

Read more
Music Interviews
6:34 pm
Fri June 26, 2015

'There's No Box For Me': Miguel On Embracing Difference

Wildheart is the follow-up to Miguel's 2012 breakout album, Kaleidoscope Dream.
Daniel Sannwald

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 9:20 pm

On his last album, Miguel sang songs that swooned with the emotion of a first kiss. Wildheart, the new album by the Grammy-winning R&B artist, takes things a little further. While that sleek mix of bass, synths and soul that powered his 2012 breakout remains, the songwriting on Wildheart takes a much more personal, introspective approach.

Read more
StoryCorps
5:04 am
Fri June 26, 2015

Charleston Stirs Memories Of Young Birmingham Bombing Victim

Gwen Moten remembers her childhood friend, Denise McNair, who died with three other girls in the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Ala., in 1963.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 6:01 pm

Fifty-one years before the deadly shootings at a church in Charleston, S.C., there was another infamous attack on a Southern black church. The 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., was bombed by the Ku Klux Klan on Sept. 15, 1963.

Four young girls were murdered. Cynthia Wesley, Carole Robertson and Addie Mae Collins were each 14 years old. Denise McNair was 11. Gwen Moten was best friends with Denise.

Read more
Music Interviews
4:28 pm
Wed June 24, 2015

Pop Singer Tori Kelly's 'Unbreakable Smile' Keeps Her Optimistic

Tori Kelly
Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Wed June 24, 2015 8:01 pm

Singer Tori Kelly is an unapologetic optimist about love, her image and her music. At the ripe old age of 22, she's been at the edges of the music business for a long time. She started singing when she was just 3 years old, and at age 11, she took her powerful, mature voice on the TV show America's Most Talented Kid -- and won.

Read more
Music Interviews
2:03 am
Wed June 24, 2015

New Documentary Finds Nina Simone 'In Between The Black And White Keys'

The documentary What Happened, Miss Simone? explores Nina Simone's rich and complicated life.
Courtesy of Peter Rodis/Netflix

Originally published on Mon June 29, 2015 6:34 pm

Even those who didn't live through Nina Simone's heyday can recognize her songs, or at least her voice. Born Eunice Waymon, the passionate performer and activist died in 2003, and today her recordings still loom larger than the rest of her story.

Read more
Television
6:18 pm
Sun June 21, 2015

The Human Drama Of Hacking Fuels TV Thriller 'Mr. Robot'

USA's Mr. Robot tells the story of a cyber-security engineer and vigilant hacker (played by Rami Malek) who also suffers from anxiety.
Sarah Shatz USA Network

Originally published on Mon June 22, 2015 10:13 am

Cyborgs and androids are nowhere to be seen in the new USA show Mr. Robot. Instead, the drama is centered on a very human interior — the mind of Elliot, the unlikely hacker hero. From his first words — "Hello, friend" — his voice-over keeps audiences squarely inside his world.

"Elliot is sort of an internal, isolated guy who can't really interact with people socially, in real life, but online he can hack them and knows all the intimate, private details of them," Sam Esmail, the show's creator and executive producer, tells NPR's Arun Rath.

Read more
Author Interviews
5:11 pm
Sun June 21, 2015

Beyond The 'Sometimes Sentimental' Story Of Filipino Migrants

Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Sun June 21, 2015 6:18 pm

Mia Alvar was born in the Philippines, but as a small child her family moved to Bahrain. A few years later, they moved again, this time to New York.

The cities of her childhood are the settings in her debut collection of short stories, In The Country. The nine stories feature very different characters, in and outside of the Philippines, who are grappling with some form of exile or emigration.

"Part of the project," she tells NPR's Arun Rath, "was getting behind the official, sometimes sentimental, narrative about overseas Filipino workers."

Read more
Music Interviews
5:11 pm
Sun June 21, 2015

Robert Glasper Puts His Trio On Shuffle

Robert Glasper's new piano trio album is called Covered.
Don Q. Hannah Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun June 21, 2015 6:18 pm

Read more
World
5:11 pm
Sun June 21, 2015

Snapshot Sleuthing Confirms Russian Military Presence In Ukraine

A soldier in the Russian army posed, rifle in hand, for a snapshot at a battlefield checkpoint. Simon Ostrovsky, at right, located the same spot in Vuhlehirsk, in Ukraine's Donetsk region.
VICE News

Originally published on Mon June 22, 2015 8:03 am

Reports of the Russian military helping pro-Russian separatist fighters in Ukraine are common — but can be hard to confirm. Russia denies that its soldiers are fighting in Ukraine.

Read more
Asia
5:11 pm
Sun June 21, 2015

From California To Kathmandu, Task Force 2 Responds To Disasters

Members of Task Force 2 from the Los Angeles County Fire Department recovered survivors from a building that collapsed in May after a major aftershock in Singati, a mountain village in Nepal.
Kashish Das AP

Originally published on Sun June 21, 2015 6:18 pm

California's Task Force 2 is ready for anything. As an elite disaster response team based in Los Angeles County, it has to be. But it's not just prepped for disasters at home — it's ready to respond to emergencies halfway around the world as well.

Just days after the devastating April 25 earthquake in Nepal, Task Force 2's firefighters, doctors and engineers were on the ground, helping rescue people.

Read more
Middle East
8:27 am
Sun June 21, 2015

For A British Man, Fighting ISIS Was Simply The Right Thing To Do

Seen here in an undated photograph, Macer Gifford — an alias he uses to protect his family — left his job as a financial trader in London to fight ISIS in Syria.
Courtesy of Macer Gifford

Originally published on Sun June 21, 2015 3:48 pm

We have heard about how ISIS is recruiting foreign fighters to join its ranks. But it's happening on the other side as well.

Just last week, a Massachusetts man who died fighting against ISIS in Syria was laid to rest.

Last year, a British man who calls himself Macer Gifford left his job as a financial trader in London and went to join the Kurds and fight the self-declared Islamic State in Syria.

Gifford spoke on the condition that NPR not reveal his real name, because he fears for the safety of his family in the UK.

Read more
Book News & Features
7:57 am
Sun June 21, 2015

A Boy And A Brutal Slaughter In 'Caminar'

Originally published on Mon June 22, 2015 10:26 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Author Interviews
5:40 am
Sun June 21, 2015

After Years Of Blackouts, A Writer Remembers What She 'Drank To Forget'

Emily Bogle Emily Bogle

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 1:34 pm

When Sarah Hepola got her very first writing job at The Austin Chronicle, her editor-in-chief gave her an unlikely Christmas gift — a hat that could hold beers. "It was my top boss," Hepola recalls, who had drawn her name in a Secret Santa gift exchange. "He just threw it on my desk and said: 'So you can drink more at work.'"

Hepola's new memoir -- Blackout: Remembering the Things I Drank to Forget -- is filled with such funny/tragic stories, about drinking until last call, blacking out, and then trying to piece it all together the following day.

Read more
Author Interviews
5:31 pm
Sat June 20, 2015

From Civilian To Spy: How An Average Guy Helped Bust A Russian Agent

Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Mon June 22, 2015 1:28 pm

For years, Naveed Jamali gave secrets to the Russians, selling out his country for cash.

Or so the Russians thought. In fact, Jamali was working for the FBI by pretending to be a spy for the Russians: a real-life double agent.

Jamali chronicles his experiences in his new book, How To Catch A Russian Spy: The True Story of an American Civilian Turned Double Agent.

The story starts back when Jamali was a child. A well-dressed Russian man entered his parent's bookstore to buy some books.

Read more
Music Interviews
5:31 pm
Sat June 20, 2015

'Lester, You Changed Our Lives': Channeling Bangs In 'How To Be a Rock Critic'

Erik Jensen portrays rock critic Lester Bangs in the new one-man play How to Be a Rock Critic.
Craig Schwartz

Originally published on Sat June 20, 2015 6:42 pm

In his 33 years on earth, rock critic Lester Bangs left behind tens of thousands of pages of writing. He died of a drug overdose in 1982 — but this month, at the Kirk Douglas Theatre in Culver City, Calif., Bangs and his ideas are coming to life on stage in the new one-man play How to Be a Rock Critic.

Read more

Pages