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Shots - Health News
7:21 pm
Sun April 6, 2014

How Public Health Advocates Are Trying To Reach Nonvaccinators

A school nurse prepares a vaccine against whooping cough before giving it to students at Mark Twain Middle School in Los Angeles.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 11:54 am

Whooping cough made a comeback in California last year, which researchers have linked to vaccine refusals. And with new measles outbreaks in Southern California, New York and British Columbia, the debate over vaccination is also spreading.

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World
6:29 pm
Sun April 6, 2014

Fighting For Rwanda's Justice In France

Rwandan genocide-hunter Dafroza Gauthier on February 4, 2014 at the opening of the trial of Pascal Simbikangwa, Rwanda's former intelligence chief, charged with complicity in the 1994 Rwandan genocide.
MARTIN BUREAU AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 8:00 pm

For more than a decade, Dafroza Gauthier and her husband, Alain, have hunted perpetrators of the 1994 Rwandan genocide. More than 800,000 people were killed in the genocide, most of them members of the Tutsi ethnic group.

Earlier this month, the couple gave testimony against former Rwandan intelligence chief Pascal Simbikangwa in Paris. On March 14, Simbikangwa was sentenced to 25 years in prison for complicity in genocide and crimes against humanity. His was the first Rwandan genocide trial to take place in France.

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Author Interviews
5:30 pm
Sun April 6, 2014

In Book's Trial Of U.S. Justice System, Wealth Gap Is Exhibit A

Courtesy of Random House

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 6:56 pm

Investigative journalist and author Matt Taibbi has long reported on American politics and business. With an old-school muckraker's nose for corruption, he examined the events leading up to the 2008 financial crisis in Griftopia. With Gonzo zeal, he described a two-party political system splintered into extreme factions in The Great Derangement.

And in his newest book, Taibbi sets out to explain what he thinks is a strange state of affairs:

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Music Interviews
4:59 pm
Sun April 6, 2014

The Coming Robot Army Just Wants To Rock

British musician Tom Jenkinson, a.k.a. Squarepusher.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 6:50 pm

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Africa
12:42 pm
Sun April 6, 2014

Since Genocide, Rwanda's Women Have Helped Lead The Recovery

Rwanda is commemorating the 20-year anniversary of the genocide. Since that time, more women have entered politics to help with the recovery.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 1:49 pm

The Rwandan genocide left a deep and profound wound. It not only decimated the Rwandan people, it destroyed the nation's political and social structures.

In 1994, after the killing stopped, women made up 70 percent of the population.

They were needed to lead Rwanda's recovery. Rwandan women moved away from traditional roles and joined politics in unprecedented numbers.

Twenty years later, the Rwandan Parliament has more women than anywhere else in the world.

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Race
10:44 am
Sun April 6, 2014

#CancelColbert Let Asian-Americans Call Out The Real Ding-Dongs

Stephen Colbert responded to criticism about a tweet about his show from his TV network last Monday, saying he would dismantle the imaginary foundation that created the stir.
Comedy Central

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 2:20 pm

It surely says something about our culture that a single tweet can turn into a major racial incident.

You've likely heard the flap over comedian Stephen Colbert's send-up of Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder's new foundation to help Native Americans.

The controversy erupted when a Twitter account associated with Colbert's show, The Colbert Report, took the joke too far — away from its original context.

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Author Interviews
5:21 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Lydia Davis' New Collection Has Stories Shorter Than This Headline

Lydia Davis is the winner of the 2013 Man Booker International Prize.
Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 1:49 pm

The writer Lydia Davis has released a new collection of short stories — and, in her trademark style, some of them are really short stories. Here's "Contingency (vs. Necessity)" in its entirety:

He could be our dog. But he is not our dog. So he barks at us.

And the title story of the collection, Can't And Won't:

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Economy
7:05 pm
Sat April 5, 2014

Americans Are On The Move, But In The Wrong Direction

Moving to San Bernardino from Los Angeles may help with housing costs, but the area doesn't have much economic opportunity.
Reed Saxon AP

Jamika lives in a two-story apartment complex surrounded by a 10-foot-high security gate in San Bernardino, Calif. The yellow paint on the buildings' outside walls is peeling.

She doesn't want to use her full name. She doesn't want too many people to know about her situation.

Jamika and her siblings had to leave the house her family was renting in South Central L.A. when the property went into foreclosure. With money so tight, Jamika moved to San Bernardino, along with three of her siblings.

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Television
5:12 pm
Sat April 5, 2014

How To Kill A Character

Jeff Perry (left) and Dan Bucatinsky play Cyrus Beene and James Novak in ABC's Scandal.
Richard Cartwright ABC

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 6:19 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Kelly McEvers.

OK. If you're still catching up on your favorite TV shows, let me say it now. You are being warned. There are major spoilers up ahead.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "HOUSE OF CARDS")

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: (As character) Oh, my God.

KEVIN SPACEY: (As Frank Underwood) And the butchery begins.

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Music Interviews
5:12 pm
Sat April 5, 2014

A Music Of Exile: Haiti During The Duvalier Years

Haiti Direct: Big Band, Mini Jazz & Twoubadou Sounds, 1960-1978
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 6:19 pm

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The New And The Next
5:12 pm
Sat April 5, 2014

A Spicy Gold Rush: Turmeric's Rise To Superfood

Ground turmeric comes from a golden-yellow root native to India.
Adeel Halim Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 6:19 pm

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest discoveries.

This week, Watson tells guest host Kelly McEvers about the growing popularity of turmeric in the U.S. The spice, which comes from a golden-yellow root native to India, is heralded for its health benefits and is being infused into a variety of food products. Some mixologists are even working it into cocktails.

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My Big Break
1:47 pm
Sat April 5, 2014

Ken Jeong: Doctor By Day, Comedian By Night

Actor Ken Jeong, formerly a doctor, credits his first big break to the 2007 film Knocked Up, which led to his role in the Hangover series.
Chris Pizzello AP

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 6:19 pm

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Before Ken Jeong was an actor, he was a doctor.

"Internal medicine was my specialty," he says. "General practice with an emphasis on adult medicine."

After a long day at the office, Jeong says he would take to the stage and perform comedy routines as a way to blow off some steam.

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Africa
11:46 am
Sat April 5, 2014

'Hotel Rwanda' Manager: We've Failed To Learn From History

Paul Rusesabagina, who sheltered more than 1,000 people in his hotel during the Rwandan genocide, says the brutal violence in Syria, the Central African Republic and the Congo shows history repeats itself while people fail to learn from it.
Courtesy Hotel Rwanda Rusesabagina Foundation

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 1:38 pm

Paul Rusesabagina is a figure from history — a terrible history.

He was the manager of the Diplomat Hotel in Kigali, Rwanda, 20 years ago, when the genocide of Rwanda's Tutsi people began. More than 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus would be killed in just three months.

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Author Interviews
5:40 am
Sat April 5, 2014

Biographer Explains How John Updike 'Captured America'

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 12:59 pm

Writing a biography of John Updike is a tricky thing: The acclaimed American writer of elegant essays and elegiac novels and short stories may have been a genius, but he was also disconcertingly normal. He liked to drink, but wasn't a drunk; he had two marriages, but wasn't a womanizer; he could be wistful, but rarely depressed. He was a straight, white, Christian man who liked golf.

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Deceptive Cadence
8:17 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

A Time Capsule From A Soviet-Era Childhood

Music from the Suitcase: A Collection of Russian Miniatures
Corey Hayes Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 3:49 pm

Violinist Yevgeny Kutik was born in 1985 in the city of Minsk, in what is now Belarus. When he was 4 years old, his parents decided it was time to leave the country and come to America.

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StoryCorps
3:15 am
Fri April 4, 2014

A Brooklyn Boy Who Lost A Life, But Helped Save Others

Elisa and Bobby Seeger remember their son, Aidan, on a visit to StoryCorps in Brooklyn.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 10:43 am

Last year, New York became the first state to require newborn screening for a genetic disorder called adrenoleukodystrophy, or ALD. The disorder rapidly attacks the nervous system. The most common form of ALD mainly affects young boys and can be fatal within a year.

But if ALD is detected in newborns, a bone marrow transplant can help them survive. The legislation is known as "Aidan's Law" for Aidan Jack Seeger, who died from ALD in 2012 at age 7.

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Sports
5:33 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Should The NCAA Change Its Rules To Pay For Play?

University of Miami President Donna Shalala cuts down the net after a basketball game against Clemson last year.
J Pat Carter AP

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:34 pm

In the next few days, the last four teams play for the NCAA men's basketball championship, a hugely profitable event for college sports.

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Author Interviews
4:02 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

In The 1870s And '80s, Being A Pedestrian Was Anything But

Courtesy of Chicago Review Press

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 11:58 am

We may think of baseball as America's national pastime, but in the 1870s and 1880s there was another sports craze sweeping the nation: competitive walking. "Watching people walk was America's favorite spectator sport," Matthew Algeo says in his new book, Pedestrianism.

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Author Interviews
3:36 am
Thu April 3, 2014

A Song Of Frogs, Motherhood And Murder In Swampy San Francisco

Emma Donoghue's previous novel was Room.
Andrew Bainbridge

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:53 am

In her bestseller Room, writer Emma Donoghue imagined what life would be like for a little boy born into captivity, to a mother who'd been kidnapped and sexually assaulted.

And in her new novel, Frog Music, she's imagined a possible solution to a very real murder, one that took place in California in 1876.

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Author Interviews
4:16 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

The Rise And Fall Of Stefan Zweig, Who Inspired 'Grand Budapest Hotel'

Stefan Zweig was born to a prosperous Jewish family in Vienna. He wrote novels, short stories and biographies.
Keystone/Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 9:54 pm

In Wes Anderson's latest film, The Grand Budapest Hotel, a writer relates the long and twisting life story of a hotel owner. It's about youthful love and lifelong obsession, and while the story is original, there's a credit at the end that reads: "Inspired by the Writings of Stefan Zweig."

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