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The Salt
3:31 am
Fri July 4, 2014

Designing The Perfectly Architectural Ice Cream Sandwich

(From left) Strawberries and cream gelato; peanut butter ice cream sandwich; dirty mint chip.
Brian Leatart Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 7:26 am

Coolhaus ice cream shop — which is just blocks from NPR West in Culver City, Calif. — is famous for its ice cream, which comes in crazy cool flavors like Whisky Luck Charms and Peking Duck.

Coolhaus recently came out with a cookbook, so NPR's Renee Montagne visited the shop to learn how some of these loopy flavors can be used as building blocks in crafting the ultimate ice cream sandwich.

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Author Interviews
3:05 am
Thu July 3, 2014

Addiction Battled Ambition For Reporter Caught In D.C.'s Crack Epidemic

In this photo, released July 17, 1989, a U.S. marshal keeps his pistol trained on suspects as other marshals raid a crack house in Washington, D.C. The city's crack epidemic lasted from the late '80s to the early '90s.
Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 11:14 am

In the late 1980s and early '90s, Washington, D.C., was a city under siege. As with other cities, it descended into near chaos because of the crack epidemic that claimed even innocent lives. Whole neighborhoods became war zones, and the nation's capital became the nation's homicide capital.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
5:58 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Is Unlimited Spending On Political Speech A Protected Right?

Burt Neuborne and Zephyr Teachout convinced audience members that the right to unlimited spending on political speech is not guaranteed by the Constitution.
Intelligence Squared U.S.

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 8:05 pm

  • Listen To The Full Audio Of The Debate
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In 2010, the Supreme Court ruled that the First Amendment protected the right of corporations and unions to spend money on political speech. That decision, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, didn't affect how much money organizations could donate to political campaigns — but it removed limits on how much they could spend themselves.

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Parallels
3:48 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Ask Me Anything: Mideast Correspondent Emily Harris Answers

Emily Harris is NPR's international correspondent based in Jerusalem.
Stephanie Federico NPR

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 6:25 pm

Just over a year ago, NPR's Emily Harris packed up and moved to Jerusalem, where she covers plenty of politics and everything else related to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
3:45 am
Wed July 2, 2014

A Woman Wrestles With A Disturbing Family Memento

Carol Zachary's grandfather, Herbert Fleming, a county auditor, was required to attend Montana's first legal triple-hanging in a barn in Meagher County, Mont., in 1917. Fleming was one of approximately 60 witnesses that day.
Courtesy of Carol Zachary

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 2:15 pm

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris dips into those stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

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Television
3:41 am
Wed July 2, 2014

'Drunk History' Serves An Educational Cocktail, With Comedic Twist

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 7:53 am

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The Salt
1:35 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply

Paul Greenberg says the decline of local fish markets, and the resulting sequestration of seafood to a corner of our supermarkets, has contributed to "the facelessness and comodification of seafood."
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 12:09 pm

What's the most popular seafood in the U.S.? Shrimp. The average American eats more shrimp per capita than tuna and salmon combined. Most of that shrimp comes from Asia, and most of the salmon we eat is also imported. In fact, 91 percent of the seafood Americans eat comes from abroad, but one-third of the seafood Americans catch gets sold to other countries.

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Technology
5:35 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

Why 140 Characters, When One Will Do? Tracing The Emoji Evolution

NPR

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 7:01 pm

You may have heard that 250 more emojis, the little smiley face icons and other symbols you can send in text messages, are coming to a cellphone near you.

The story of the emoji starts in Japan in the mid-1990s. Back then, pagers were all the rage with teenagers.

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Business
6:45 pm
Sun June 29, 2014

For Tipped Workers, A Different Minimum Wage Battle

States may have their own higher wage laws, but the federal minimum wage for tipped workers is $2.13 an hour.
AP

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 8:14 am

The federal minimum wage for tipped workers has been $2.13 since 1991. That pay rate tends to get lost in the larger debate over whether to raise the national minimum wage for nontipped workers, which is $7.25 an hour.

In theory, the money from tips should make up the difference in pay — and then some. But according to a White House report, tipped workers are more than twice as likely as other workers to experience poverty.

Living On Tips

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The Impact of War
5:07 pm
Sun June 29, 2014

For U.S. Vets, Iraq's Newest Conflict Awakens Complex Emotions

A decade ago, U.S. soldiers were fighting and rebuilding in the Iraqi cities of Mosul and Tikrit. The past few weeks have seen those cities, among others, fall to the Sunni militant group ISIS. Here, a member of the Kurdish Peshmerga forces stands guard Thursday near an ISIS checkpoint in Mosul.
Karim Sahib AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 8:45 am

In Iraq this weekend, government forces launched an offensive against the Sunni militant group known as the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, or ISIS. On Sunday, the government said it was using Russian-made jets to attack Sunni militants in the northern cities of Tikrit, the hometown of the late dictator Saddam Hussein, and Mosul. Both cities remain under insurgent control.

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Movie Interviews
5:05 pm
Sun June 29, 2014

Behind Optimus Prime (And Eeyore), One Man's Signature Voice

Voice actor Peter Cullen arrives at the premiere of Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen in June 2009.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 8:20 am

Transformers: Age of Extinction has smashed its way to the No. 1 spot at the box office. Director Michael Bay's film franchise has consistently topped charts since the first film arrived in theaters in 2007.

The live-action films have embraced the latest in visual affects — but the movies have also called back to the series' past, through the voice of Peter Cullen.

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Author Interviews
5:05 pm
Sun June 29, 2014

Ja Rule: 'I Took It Upon Myself To Become A Man'

Ja Rule at NPR's New York bureau in June.
Quoctrung Bui NPR

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 8:55 am

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Music Interviews
8:12 am
Sun June 29, 2014

Joe Henry On Marriage And The Songs That Embody It

Joe Henry's latest album is Invisible Hour.
Sarah Tilotta NPR

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 10:58 am

Joe Henry sounds like a pretty good name for a no-nonsense jack-of-all-trades, a guy devoted to family who knows about a day's pay for a day's work, and about commitment.

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All Tech Considered
5:26 pm
Sat June 28, 2014

Modern Video Games Go Beyond 'Jumping On Blocks'

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 12:35 pm

The video game BioShock Infinite received widespread praise for having a rich narrative packed with philosophy when it debuted last year. The game sold millions of copies.

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Code Switch
4:59 pm
Sat June 28, 2014

'Everything I Never Told You' Exposed In Biracial Family's Loss

Everything I Never Told You is Celeste Ng's debut novel about a Chinese-American family living in 1970s Ohio. She is currently working on a second novel and a collection of short stories.
Kevin Day The Penguin Press

Originally published on Sat June 28, 2014 6:22 pm

It's May, 1977, in small-town Ohio, and the Lee family is sitting down at breakfast. James is Chinese-American and Marilyn is white, and they have three children — two girls and a boy. But on this day, their middle child Lydia, who is also their favorite, is nowhere to be found.

That's how Celeste Ng's new novel, Everything I Never Told You, begins.

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Music Interviews
4:59 pm
Sat June 28, 2014

Ani Cordero Pays Tribute To The History Of Latin Protest Music

Ani Cordero's new album is Recordar: Latin American Songs Of Love And Protest.
Erin Patrice O'Brien Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat June 28, 2014 6:22 pm

New York's Ani Cordero was one of the founding members of the Latin rock band Pistolera. On her new solo album, she's unplugged — but no less powerful.

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Author Interviews
5:28 am
Sat June 28, 2014

Princip Pulled 'The Trigger,' But Never Meant To Start A War

Originally published on Sat June 28, 2014 12:43 pm

It's a question that's persisted for over a century: how could a slight 19-year-old fire two shots and end up starting a war that killed millions around the world?

Tim Butcher, the well-traveled British war correspondent who covered later wars in the Balkans, went back to Sarajevo to try to learn more about Gavrilo Princip, the young Serbian revolutionary who changed the course of history in the worst way by assassinating Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, and his wife Sophie.

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StoryCorps
3:26 am
Fri June 27, 2014

'Don't Sneak': Dad's Unexpected Advice To His Gay Son In The '50s

Patrick Haggerty dresses in drag in 1959. As a teen, Haggerty learned from his father never to "sneak" around his identity.
Courtesy of Patrick Haggerty

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 3:49 pm

StoryCorps is marking the anniversary of a pivotal moment for gay rights, the 1969 Stonewall riots. Forty-five years ago, on June 28, gay protesters clashed with police in New York. Now, StoryCorps is launching an initiative to preserve the stories of LGBT people called "OutLoud."

In the 1950s in rural Washington, a teenage boy learned an important lesson about self-acceptance. Patrick Haggerty, now 70, didn't know he was gay at the time, but says his father knew what direction he was headed.

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First Reads
6:45 am
Tue June 24, 2014

Exclusive First Read: You CAN Phone Home Again In 'Landline'

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 12:40 pm

Rainbow Rowell turns her attention back to adult (but still young at heart) fiction in Landline, the story of Georgie, a successful sitcom writer who's not having a lot of success on the homefront. It's coming up on Christmas, and Georgie suddenly backs out of a planned holiday trip to her husband Neal's hometown — something's come up at work and she just has to stay. But when Neal packs up the kids and goes without her, she has to face up to the trouble in her marriage.

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Men In America
6:14 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

The New American Man Doesn't Look Like His Father

While life has changed significantly for American men in the past half-century, notions of masculinity remain tied to those that may have been passed down from this father to the son on his shoulders.
Evans/Three Lions Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 11:36 am

This summer, All Things Considered is exploring what it means to be a man in America today. In some ways, the picture for men has changed dramatically over the past 50 years. More women than men are going to college, and the economy is moving away from jobs that traditionally favored men, like manufacturing and mining. Attitudes have also changed on the social front, with young men having more egalitarian attitudes toward women and expectations of being involved fathers.

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