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Television
5:45 pm
Sun November 23, 2014

'Getting On' Star Niecy Nash: 'I Never Wanted To Be Funny'

Niecy Nash (right) plays DiDi, a nurse at an extended care facility, in the HBO comedy series Getting On, which was modeled after the hit BBC series of the same name. Betty Buckley plays one of her patients.
Lacey Terrell HBO

Originally published on Mon November 24, 2014 1:51 pm

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Code Switch
5:45 pm
Sun November 23, 2014

Racial Disparities In Arrests Are Prevalent, But Cause Isn't Clear

Protesters and law enforcement officers face off during a protest outside the Ferguson Police Department in October. Ferguson police statistics show the department arrest blacks at a higher rate than other racial groups — but that disparity is true for police departments across the country.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

Originally published on Mon November 24, 2014 12:00 pm

Ferguson, Mo., continues to watch and wait as a grand jury decides whether to indict police officer Darren Wilson in the killing of 18-year-old Michael Brown.

Brown's death was the spark for mass protests in Ferguson, but many of the city's black population say the problems go deeper, and that blacks are unfairly singled out by police.

Ferguson police statistics show the department does arrest blacks at a higher rate than other racial groups. But that disparity is true for police departments across the country.

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My Big Break
5:11 pm
Sun November 23, 2014

After Injury, Tony Little Told Himself: 'You Can Do It!'

Tony Little calls himself America's Personal Trainer. He was first inspired to produce workout videos after an injury left him largely homebound, and he saw Jane Fonda's exercise program on TV.
Courtesy of Tony Little

Originally published on Mon November 24, 2014 3:31 pm

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

You probably recognize him as the energized muscle man with the ponytail selling his exercise machine, The Gazelle, on late-night infomercials: Tony Little, also known as America's Personal Trainer.

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Movie Interviews
5:11 pm
Sun November 23, 2014

'Madagascar' Director Polishes His Penguin Voice

Penguins of Madagascar follows a spy team of penguins, who first appeared in the film series Madagascar, as they work to stymie an evil octopus' plan to take over the world.
DreamWorks Animation

Originally published on Mon November 24, 2014 9:36 am

The voice actors in Penguins of Madagascar, out Wednesday, include some of the boldface names you might expect on a big-budget animated film. John Malkovich voices an evil octopus, abducting penguins around the world. Benedict Cumberbatch voices a wolf who helps four penguins on their spy mission to stop the villain.

But the star of the film, a penguin named Skipper, is voiced by Tom McGrath — who co-directed the first three films in the "Madagascar" franchise, and is an executive producer of the new installment.

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History
10:21 am
Sun November 23, 2014

Marshmallows On Sweet Potatoes? Thanksgiving's Traditions Exposed

NPR producer Olly Dearden is a fan of most classic Thanksgiving dishes, but calls sweet potatoes topped with marshmallows a "culinary abomination."
Stephen Little Flickr

Originally published on Mon November 24, 2014 1:28 pm

Thanksgiving traditions can be a bit inscrutable for people who didn't grow up in the U.S., like NPR producer Olly Dearden. Disgusted by the thought of sweet potatoes topped with marshmallows and confused by the pardoning of turkeys who've committed no crimes, Dearden talked with several experts in the field, and got some answers to his questions.

When was the first Thanksgiving?

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Deceptive Cadence
5:53 am
Sun November 23, 2014

For The Season, Trio Mediaeval Spans Centuries

Trio Mediaeval is (from left) Berit Opheim, Anna Maria Friman and Linn Andrea Fulgseth.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun November 23, 2014 1:26 pm

For all those who just can't bear to hear "Jingle Bell Rock" or any of the other Yuletide earworms that will invade shopping malls and radio waves in the coming months, Norway's Trio Mediaeval has some new old music for the holiday season.

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The Two-Way
2:59 am
Sun November 23, 2014

Former D.C. Mayor Marion Barry Dies

Washington, D.C., Councilman and former Mayor Marion Barry was famously re-elected after going to jail for crack cocaine possession, but started out as a champion for the city's disenfranchised.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Sun November 23, 2014 1:28 pm

Marion Barry, the fiery Washington, D.C., politician who was famously re-elected after going to jail for crack cocaine possession, has died after months of battling health issues. He was 78.

The four-term mayor, who was still serving his third term on the D.C. Council, was famous for fighting for the District's disenfranchised, but won national notoriety after he was caught on FBI video with an ex-girlfriend and crack cocaine in 1990.

He was considered by many to be the district's most charismatic and controversial politician.

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Book News & Features
5:53 pm
Sat November 22, 2014

After Backlash, Computer Engineer Barbie Gets New Set Of Skills

Computer Engineer Barbie is shown at the New York Toy Fair in New York. Critics took issue this week with a book that portrays Barbie needing help from boys in order to make a video game and fix a virus.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Mon November 24, 2014 12:53 pm

Women in the technology field have faced all manner of insults, including, most recently, GamerGate, which highlighted sexism and harassment in video game culture. This week, another insult — from a seemingly more benign source — set off a loud online cry of: "Are you kidding me?"

A book called Barbie: I Can Be A Computer Engineer was originally published in 2010. Author and Disney screenwriter Pamela Ribon discovered the book at a friend's house and was initially excited at the book's prospects, she tells guest host Tess Vigeland.

But then she continued reading.

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Around the Nation
5:53 pm
Sat November 22, 2014

Lost — Then Found — Along The Border, Objects Become Art

Galindo's "zapatello" uses gears and cranks to hit a shoe and glove on a drum made of a tire and rawhide.
Richard Misrach Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco, Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York and Marc Selwyn Fine Art, Los Angeles

Originally published on Sat November 22, 2014 9:05 pm

Depictions of the U.S.-Mexico border often show a fence, and desolation on either side.

But the nearly 2,000-mile stretch of land is far from empty — among other things, it holds lost possessions.

Photographer Richard Misrach spent the last five years documenting everything he came across along the border. During his expedition, he says, it was common to find items left in the middle of nowhere by migrants passing through.

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Music Interviews
2:03 am
Sat November 22, 2014

Bryan Adams Celebrates The Classics On New Covers Album

Bryan Adams' new album of covers is titled Tracks Of My Years.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed December 17, 2014 7:24 pm

Bryan Adams' "Summer Of '69" has inspired many a late night in a karaoke bar.

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Movie Interviews
3:49 pm
Fri November 21, 2014

Benedict Cumberbatch: Code Breaker Alan Turing Was A Puzzle Himself

Benedict Cumberbatch plays British mathematician Alan Turing in The Imitation Game. "You're not asked to like the character," Cumberbatch says. "You're introduced to him, warts and all."
Black Bear Pictures

Originally published on Wed December 17, 2014 6:57 pm

The Imitation Game is the story of Alan Turing: British mathematician, World War II code breaker and seminal theoretician of computer science. "It's a war thriller, it's a love story and a tragic testament to a genius wronged," the star of the film, Benedict Cumberbatch, tells NPR's Robert Siegel.

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StoryCorps
4:19 am
Fri November 21, 2014

'If We Left, They Wouldn't Have Nobody'

Maurice Rowland (left) and Miguel Alvarez were working at an assisted living home last fall. When it shut down, Maurice -€- the cook --” and Miguel — the janitor --” stayed to take care of the residents left behind.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri November 21, 2014 12:46 pm

When an assisted living home in California shut down last fall, many of its residents were left behind, with nowhere to go.

The staff at the Valley Springs Manor left when they stopped getting paid — except for cook Maurice Rowland and Miguel Alvarez, the janitor.

"There was about 16 residents left behind, and we had a conversation in the kitchen, 'What are we going to do?' " Rowland says.

"If we left, they wouldn't have nobody," the 34-year-old Alvarez says.

Their roles quickly transformed for the elderly residents, who needed round-the-clock care.

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Politics
5:21 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

Rep. Labrador On Immigration Action: 'This Is Illegal'

Rep. Raul Labrador, R-Idaho, said of the president's planned immigration announcement, "the first thing we need to explain to the American people is that this is illegal."
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 6:30 pm

One voice chiming in against President Obama's expected immigration announcement is Rep. Raul Labrador, a Republican from Idaho.

Labrador is backed by the Tea Party, part of the Congressional Hispanic Leadership Institute, and a former immigration lawyer who represented undocumented residents fighting deportation.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
5:17 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

Debate: Should Physician-Assisted Suicide Be Legal?

Bioethicist Peter Singer argues that, under certain circumstances, people should have the right to die at a time of their choosing.
Samuel La Hoz Intelligence Squared U.S.

Since Oregon legalized physician-assisted suicide for the terminally ill in 1997, more than 700 people have taken their lives with prescribed medication — including Brittany Maynard, a 29-year-old with an incurable brain tumor, who ended her life earlier this month.

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Parallels
3:50 am
Mon November 17, 2014

In A Dutch Town, A Glowing Bike Path Inspired By Van Gogh

Artist Dan Roosegaarde pays tribute to Vincent Van Gogh's painting Starry Night by creating this bike path in Van Gogh's hometown of Eindhoven.
Courtesy of Studio Roosegaarde

Originally published on Mon November 17, 2014 12:27 pm

In the Dutch town of Eindhoven, artist Daan Roosegaarde has paid homage to its most famous resident, Vincent Van Gogh, by creating a glowing bike path that relies on solar-powered LED lights and interprets his classic painting Starry Night.

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Weekends On All Things Considered Podcast
7:36 pm
Sun November 16, 2014

Cyber Warfare, Wearables In Tech, And New Music From Bryan Ferry

Bryan Ferry's new album, Avonmore, comes out Nov. 17.
Courtesy of the artist

Reporter Shane Harris on his new book @War: The Rise of the Military-Internet Complex, the lead designer behind Google Glass on designing wearables for a broad audience, musician Bryan Ferry on his latest album, Avonmore, and much more in this week's podcast edition of Weekends on All Things Considered.

Around the Nation
6:22 pm
Sun November 16, 2014

Criminal Law Says Minors Can't Consent — But Some Civil Courts Disagree

Originally published on Sun November 16, 2014 9:00 pm

Protecting young people from sexual predators would seem to be a universally-held value in this country: No state has an age of consent lower than 16.

But in some courtrooms, attorneys argue that children can make decisions about whom they have sex with — and in some cases, those attorneys are winning.

One of those cases is currently under appeal in California. In 2010, a 28-year old middle-school math teacher began a six-month sexual relationship with a 14-year-old female student at his school.

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Goats and Soda
11:59 am
Sun November 16, 2014

Google Asks Users To Help Fight Ebola — And They Answer With Cash

Google CEO Larry Page.
Jeff Chiu AP

Originally published on Sun November 16, 2014 12:26 pm

When you think philanthropy, Facebook and Google don't usually come to mind.

But maybe in your travels across the Internet this week, you notice that both companies placed banners ads on their pages asking you to help end the Ebola epidemic in West Africa.

Google pledged to match every dollar donated by its users with $2. The company has already reached its limit of $7.5 million — $5 million from Google and $2.5 million from donors.

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Author Interviews
8:07 am
Sun November 16, 2014

Today's Fairy Tales Started Out (Even More) Dark And Harrowing

Originally published on Mon November 17, 2014 1:22 pm

It's well-known that our favorite fairy tales started out darker than the ones Disney animators brought to life. But you might be surprised by how much darker the originals were.

For the first time, a new translation of the Brothers Grimm's tales reveals exactly how unsanitized and murderous the bedtime stories really were. Jack Zipes, author of The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm, is the only person who has ever translated the first edition of their tales into English.

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History
4:37 am
Sun November 16, 2014

Family Film Offers Glimpse Of 'Three Minutes In Poland' Before Holocaust

During a 1938 vacation to his hometown, Glenn Kurtz's grandfather filmed the townspeople of Nasielsk, a Jewish community in Poland, just before World War II.
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Originally published on Sun November 16, 2014 12:25 pm

In 2009, Glenn Kurtz stumbled across some old family films in a closet in his parents' house in Florida. One of the films, shot more than 70 years earlier by his grandparents while on vacation in Europe, turned out to include footage of his grandfather's hometown in Poland.

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