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12:03 pm
Sat June 7, 2014

Balkan Brass Band Favorites From 'Global Village'

The Brooklyn band Slavic Soul Party! combines Balkan brass with funk and jazz.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun June 8, 2014 8:45 am

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Music Interviews
2:03 am
Sat June 7, 2014

What Philip Glass And Tommy Tutone Have In Common

Former Tommy Tutone member Jim Keller has just released his third solo album.
G M D THREE Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 10:30 am

As a member of the band Tommy Tutone, Jim Keller co-wrote one of the biggest hits of the 1980s: the anthemic "867-5309/Jenny." But his resume also includes another end of the musical spectrum: Keller also manages composer Philip Glass. Somewhere in between, there's his current individual career. The musician has just released his third solo album, Heaven Can Wait.

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Author Interviews
4:20 am
Fri June 6, 2014

Wait A Second ... Is That Hitchhiker John Waters?

Filmmaker John Waters recently hitchhiked across America and said it reaffirmed his belief in the goodness of people.
Jason Kempin Getty Images for EJAF

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 5:23 am

A couple of years ago, film director and writer John Waters decided to hitchhike alone from his Baltimore home to his apartment in San Francisco — and see what happened. The so-called Pope of Trash — the man behind the films Pink Flamingos and Cry-Baby — managed to get many rides — 21 in all. He chronicles his cross-country adventure in a new book called Carsick.

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StoryCorps
4:00 am
Fri June 6, 2014

From Father To Son, Life Lessons Passed Down Through Generations

Thompson Williams with his son, Kiamichi-tet Williams. Thompson remembers his father, Melford Williams, as someone who "could swear with the best of them" but was never angry with anyone.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 11:09 am

Melford Williams, a World War II veteran and tribal leader with the Caddo Nation, raised eight kids during the 1950s and '60s. He died in 1978, and his grandson, Kiamichi-tet Williams, never got a chance to meet him.

On a visit to StoryCorps in Denver, Kiamichi-tet asked his dad, Thompson Williams, about his grandfather.

"He wasn't the biggest guy, but people reacted to him like he was [a] giant," Thompson says. His father was a kindhearted man who wasn't afraid to cry, Thompson says.

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Code Switch
2:29 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

For Comic Michael Che, 'Comfortable' Comedy Won't Fly

The Daily Show recently debuted its newest correspondent, Michael Che.
Paul Marotta Courtesy of Michael Che

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 7:58 pm

Editor's Note: This is an interview with a comedian. Since comedy leans heavy on timing and delivery, this interview is best heard. (The audio will be available around 7 p.m. ET.)

Meet Michael Che, The Daily Show's newest correspondent. He's 30, and though he only began performing stand-up in 2009, his resume is impressive.

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Movie Interviews
3:31 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Film Critic Kenneth Turan Picks 54 Films That Are 'Not To Be Missed'

The 1950 film Sunset Boulevard, starring Gloria Swanson and William Holden, is one of the 54 movies Kenneth Turan says should not be missed.
CinemaPhoto Corbis

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 12:40 pm

You normally hear Los Angeles Times and Morning Edition film critic Kenneth Turan reviewing new movies, but this week, we're talking about old films with him instead. That's because he's written a new book called Not to Be Missed: Fifty-Four Favorites from a Lifetime of Film. In it, he offers up tidbits of Hollywood history and behind-the-scenes drama, as well as his critical analysis of some of the world's greatest movies — some familiar, some obscure.

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Law
3:28 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

'Burning Down The House' Makes The Case Against Juvenile Incarceration

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 4:57 pm

The American rate of juvenile incarceration is seven times that of Great Britain, and 18 times that of France. It costs, on average, $88,000 a year to keep a youth locked up — far more than the U.S. spends on a child's education.

But the biggest problem with juvenile incarceration, author Nell Bernstein tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies, is that instead of helping troubled kids get their lives back on track, detention usually makes their problems worse, and sets them in the direction of more crime and self-destructive behavior.

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Music Interviews
2:28 am
Wed June 4, 2014

Bob Mould's Beautiful, Ruinous Life In Punk

Bob Mould's latest album is Beauty & Ruin.
Jay Blakesberg Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 3:26 pm

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Author Interviews
5:36 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

From Lunch (n.) To Balding (adj.), Some Words Are Just 'Bad English'

Originally published on Sat June 7, 2014 11:02 pm

Ammon Shea, author of Reading the OED, has just come out with a new book about words — words like "dilapidated," "balding" and "lunch." Shea says those words were once frowned upon, as were more than 200 other words he has compiled.

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Author Interviews
3:28 am
Tue June 3, 2014

'The Director' Offers A Glimpse Into The Digital Underground

David Ignatius is a columnist for the Washington Post who has covered both the CIA and the Middle East. The Director is his ninth book.
W.W. Norton

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 11:09 am

A year ago this week, The Guardian and The Washington Post first published stories that came out of revelations from NSA leaker Edward Snowden.

The leaks brought new focus onto U.S. intelligence agencies themselves — and how they keep their secrets safe. The same themes come up in a new spy thriller from author and veteran Post columnist David Ignatius.

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Author Interviews
5:10 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

'How Not To Be Wrong' In Math Class? Add A Dose Of Skepticism

Rudyanto Wijaya iStockphoto

Originally published on Sat June 7, 2014 11:01 pm

In How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking, University of Wisconsin professor Jordan Ellenberg celebrates the virtues of mathematics, especially when they're taught well. He writes that a math teacher has to be a guide to good reasoning, and "a math course that fails do so is essentially teaching the student to be a very slow, buggy version of Microsoft Excel. And, let's be frank, that really is what many of our math courses are doing."

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Around the Nation
7:04 pm
Sun June 1, 2014

When A Bullet Misses Its Target, It Can Still Kill

Chicago police detectives investigate the scene where a number of people, including a 3-year-old child, were shot in a city park in Chicago in 2013.
Paul Beaty AP

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 1:08 pm

In May, multiple people were struck or even killed by stray bullets in cities across the country, including Sacramento, Calif., and Des Moines, Iowa. In Washington, D.C., a 6-year-old is recovering from getting shot on a playground.

Thursday, Betty Howard, a 58-year-old special education teacher, was talking with friends inside a real-estate office in Chicago's South Side when she was killed by a stray bullet.

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Weekends On All Things Considered Podcast
7:00 pm
Sun June 1, 2014

Stray Bullets And Street Violence, 'Sadvertising,' And Meshell Ndegeocello

Meshell Ndegeocello's latest album is Comet, Come To Me.
Jason Rodgers Courtesy of the artist
  • Stray Bullets And Street Violence, 'Sadvertising,' And Meshell Ndegeocello

Assessing the toll of stray bullets on American communities, how advertisers woo customers with tears and emotion, and a live performance and conversation with musician Meshell Ndegeocello. All that and more are on this week's podcast edition of weekends on All Things Considered.

Music Interviews
5:20 pm
Sun June 1, 2014

Meshell Ndegeocello Trades Songs And Stories, Live In L.A.

Meshell Ndegeocello's latest album is Comet, Come To Me.
Jason Rodgers Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 6:58 am

After two decades recording and performing, Meshell Ndegeocello no longer has any illusions about the way music publicity works. "You need those generalizations to create a marketing scheme," the celebrated bassist and songwriter says, "and it's hard to make a generalization about me."

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Author Interviews
5:13 pm
Sun June 1, 2014

'Remember Me Like This': A Family Rebuilds In Tragedy's Aftermath

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 8:21 am

For all of the novels that have been penned about dramatic kidnappings and abductions, few tell of what life is like after a loved one's return. That's where Bret Anthony Johnston's book, Remember Me Like This, begins.

It follows the Campbell family in a small town in Texas as their son Justin is returned four years after his disappearance. Rather than focusing on the details of the abduction, Johnston tells the story of a family as they struggle to rebuild.

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The Sunday Conversation
11:58 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Tiananmen Survivor Looks Back At China's 'Lost Opportunity'

Shen Tong was a 20-year-old student in Beijing during the Tiananmen Square massacre.
Courtesy of Teresa Lin

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 12:47 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

This week marks 25 years since the massacre at Tiananmen Square in Beijing. In 1989, Chinese security forces conducted a widespread crackdown on pro-democracy protesters that left hundreds — some say thousands — dead. But months before the standoff, protesters saw no sign of coming violence.

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The Salt
5:05 am
Sun June 1, 2014

The Humble Knish: Chock-Full Of Carbs And History

A woman in front of Mrs. Stahl's knish shop in Brooklyn's Brighton Beach neighborhood where author Laura Silver went as a child.
Courtesy of the University Press of New England

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 7:45 am

When Laura Silver's favorite knish shop in New York closed it doors, she started to investigate why it shut down. And that led to a years-long research project, she tells Weekend Edition's Rachel Martin.

Her book Knish: In Search of the Jewish Soul Food explores the history of the baked delicacy filled with meat or vegetables and what it means to the people who love it.

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Music Interviews
2:03 am
Sun June 1, 2014

In Perfect Movie Music, Filling Space Is An Art

Scarlett Johansson and Bill Murray's performances got an emotional boost from Brian Reitzell, the music supervisor for Lost in Translation and many other films.
Focus Features

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 12:47 pm

For more conversations with music makers, check out NPR's Music Interviews.

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Movie Interviews
6:20 pm
Sat May 31, 2014

What Is Courage?: 'Korengal' Breaks Down War In Afghanistan

Sgt. 1st Class Mark Patterson checks his men at Outpost Restrepo in Afghanistan, as documented in the new film Korengal.
Outpost Films

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 6:42 pm

In the new documentary Korengal, journalist and director Sebastian Junger again takes viewers into Afghanistan's Korengal Valley — once considered one of the military's most dangerous postings.

The film uses footage shot by Junger and the late photojournalist Tim Hetherington. Between 2007 and 2008, Junger and Hetherington spent 10 months with a platoon of about 30 men at an outpost called Restrepo.

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Media
6:20 pm
Sat May 31, 2014

Sad Men: How Advertisers Are Selling With Emotion

A screenshot of the well-known public service announcement from the 1970s about litter, which features a crying Iron Eyes Cody.
YouTube

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 2:45 pm

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