Philip Reeves

Philip Reeves is an award-winning veteran international correspondent based in Islamabad, Pakistan. Previous to his current role, he covered Europe out of NPR's bureau in London.

Reeves has spent two decades working as a journalist overseas, reporting from a wide range of places including the former Soviet Union, the Middle East and Asia.

A member of the NPR team that won highly prestigious Alfred I. duPont–Columbia University and George Foster Peabody awards for coverage of the conflict in Iraq, Reeves has been honored several times by the South Asian Journalists Association.

In 2010, Reeves moved to London from New Delhi after a stint of more than seven years working in and around South Asia. He traveled widely in India, taking listeners on voyages along the Ganges River and the ancient Grand Trunk Road. He also made numerous trips to cover unrest and political turmoil in Pakistan.

Reeves joined NPR in 2004, after spending 17 years as a correspondent for the British daily newspaper, The Independent. During the early stages of his career, he worked for BBC radio and television after training on the Bath Chronicle newspaper in western Britain.

Over the years, Reeves has covered a wide range of stories - from the Waco siege, to the growth of the Internet, Boris Yeltsin's erratic presidency, the economic rise of India, and conflicts in Gaza and the West Bank, Chechnya, Iraq, Afghanistan and Sri Lanka.

Graduating from Cambridge University, Reeves earned a degree in English literature. He and his wife have one daughter. His family originates from New Zealand.

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Asia
4:57 pm
Wed July 22, 2015

Despite Fear Of Bullets, One Pakistani Minority Refuses To Stay Tight-Lipped

Originally published on Wed July 22, 2015 7:04 pm

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Asia
4:28 pm
Wed June 24, 2015

Death Toll Rises To 800 As Heat Wave Hits Pakistan

Originally published on Wed June 24, 2015 8:01 pm

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Parallels
1:16 pm
Wed June 17, 2015

In Combustible, Muslim Karachi, A Christian Erects A 140-Foot Cross

Parvez Henry Gill, a devout Christian, is building a 140-foot cross in Karachi, Pakistan. Christians are a tiny minority in mostly Muslim Pakistan and are sometimes targeted in violent attacks. Gill says he has received many threats, but calls the cross a "symbol of peace."
Phil Reeves NPR

Originally published on Wed June 17, 2015 7:08 pm

Eighteen months have elapsed since Parvez Henry Gill first began tackling one of the more unusual and sensitive assignments that anyone, anywhere, is ever likely to receive.

Now he is close to completing the task: the construction of a 140-foot tall Christian cross in the middle of Karachi, the business capital of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan.

Wrapped in bamboo scaffolding, the cross juts into the sky above this turbulent port city, where Sunni Islamist militants frequently target religious minorities — usually Shia Muslims, but sometimes Christians, too.

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Asia
5:02 am
Thu June 11, 2015

Pakistan Executes Man Who Was 15 When Charged With Murder

Relatives of convicted murderer Aftab Bahadur mourn beside his body after his execution in Lahore, Pakistan, on Wednesday. Bahadur was just 15 when he was accused of a 1992 murder. Pakistan has executed more than 150 people since lifting a moratorium on the death penalty last December.
Arif Ali AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 11, 2015 3:36 pm

Shortly before he was put to death, Aftab Bahadur wrote an essay. He spoke of his alienation and loneliness, of the comfort he found in art and poetry, and of the anguish of awaiting execution on death row in Pakistan.

"I doubt there is anything more dreadful than being told that you are going to die, and then sitting in a prison cell just waiting for that moment," he said, according to a text translated from Urdu and released by Reprieve, a human rights group based in Britain.

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Asia
4:44 pm
Wed June 10, 2015

Pakistani Journalists Divided Over Whether Government Perks Cloud Their Autonomy

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 6:46 pm

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Parallels
3:25 am
Wed May 20, 2015

Live On Pakistani TV: A Call-In Show About Sex

Dr. Nadim Uddin Siddiqui hosts a weekly call-in show about sexual issues on a Pakistani cable television channel. The program, Clinic Online, is a rarity for a conservative Muslim nation, but has proved popular, particularly among women.
Abdul Sattar NPR

Originally published on Sat July 11, 2015 1:15 am

It's long been assumed that, in conservative Islamic societies, sex is a subject to be spoken about, if it's discussed at all, in guilty whispers.

Yet, for many months now, women in Pakistan have been dialing in to a TV show to ask about profoundly personal issues — live on air.

"I have to talk about my husband," said a woman who gave her name as Sonia on one of the show's recent editions. "His sperm count is very low ..."

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World
4:52 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Pakistan Steps Up Pressure On Afghan Taliban

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 8:42 am

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Asia
5:02 am
Tue May 5, 2015

Protesters Park On Karachi's Press Club Sidewalk Waiting To Be Heard

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 7:44 am

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

In the United States, voicing a strong opinion can get you denounce on Twitter. In Pakistan, voicing a strong opinion can get you killed.

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Middle East
7:51 am
Sun April 26, 2015

Pakistani Activists Mourn Slain Human Rights Proponent

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 7:42 am

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Asia
5:37 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

China-Pakistan Deal Highlights Waning U.S. Influence In Region

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 6:25 pm

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World
4:39 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Chinese President Visits Pakistan To Finalize Billion-Dollar Trade Route Plan

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 5:18 pm

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Asia
5:20 pm
Sun April 19, 2015

Chinese President To Discuss Massive Trade Route During Pakistan Visit

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 6:36 pm

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Middle East
5:07 am
Fri April 10, 2015

Pakistan's Dilemma: Should It Assist Saudi Arabia In Yemen Operation?

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 7:56 am

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Parallels
8:33 am
Sun April 5, 2015

Will New Zealand Rebuild The Cathedral My Forefather Erected?

The badly damaged Christchurch Cathedral is pictured on Sept. 7, 2011 during a tour given to foreign journalists visiting the city ahead of the rugby 2011 World Cup. England rugby manager Martin Johnson and several members of the playing squad visited the city to see the stadium and the city center which were damaged by an earthquake in February.
Paul Ellis AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 5, 2015 11:19 am

He has a swirl of graying whiskers stretching down to his collar, yet he wears a tiny mustache so precisely groomed that it almost could have been typed. His face is confident and stern, befitting a gentleman of substance.

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NPR Ed
7:53 am
Sun March 15, 2015

From Afghanistan's Rubble, A Teacher Builds A School Of Ideas

Aziz Royesh is one of 10 finalists for the $1 million Global Teacher Prize.
Zabihullah Tamanna for NPR

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 3:44 pm

Aziz Royesh is a man whose life has been defined by one over-arching ambition: He says he simply wants to be a teacher.

At 46, he has achieved that goal in one of the most difficult and dangerous environments in the world — Afghanistan. He has also founded a school that is now winning international acclaim as a model for education in that war-battered nation.

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Afghanistan
5:18 pm
Sun February 22, 2015

New Defense Secretary Makes Unannounced Trip To Afghanistan

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 7:21 pm

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Sports
5:02 am
Thu February 19, 2015

Captivated Afghans Watch Cricket Team's World Cup Debut

Originally published on Thu February 19, 2015 7:56 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
4:07 pm
Tue February 17, 2015

At His Villa, Pakistan's Musharraf Awaits Trial And Holds Court

Former Pakistani president Pervez Musharraf speaks to the media in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, on March 24, 2013, shortly before ending his self-imposed exile and returning to his homeland. He now faces murder and treason charges in Pakistan, but is free on bail and living in a villa in Karachi.
Daniel Berehulak Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 17, 2015 7:08 pm

He is indicted for treason and murder. He is forbidden from going abroad. He is banned for life from running for elected office.

It is hard to imagine how Pervez Musharraf, former military ruler of Pakistan, could be in much deeper water than this.

Yet, as the ex-president and army chief sits in his apricot-colored villa, ruminating over his predicament, he does not sound — or look — much like a man unduly burdened by worry.

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Middle East
4:00 pm
Mon February 16, 2015

As Pakistan Turns Courts Over To Military, Some Fear Revival Of Army's Power

Originally published on Mon February 16, 2015 7:35 pm

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Parallels
5:02 am
Mon February 2, 2015

The Theft Of An Infant Son: In Pakistan, A Not-Uncommon Crime

Shazia and Ziaullah Khan's baby boy was stolen from a hospital ward in Islamabad, Pakistan.
Abdul Sattar NPR

Originally published on Mon February 2, 2015 2:20 pm

Individual tragedies easily go unnoticed in Pakistan. People are too busy grappling with corruption, militant violence, poverty and an infrastructure so dysfunctional that everyone, everywhere endures daily power outages.

Ziaullah Khan and his wife, Shazia, are the victims of one of the cruelest crimes of all. Yet in this troubled land, they're struggling to get anyone to listen — let alone help.

A Stolen Baby Boy

They're a young couple, just starting out. She's a teacher; he works in a print shop. They live in Pakistan's capital, Islamabad.

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