Robert Siegel

Robert Siegel is senior host of NPR's award-winning evening newsmagazine All Things Considered. With 40 years of experience working in radio news, Siegel is still at it hosting the country's most-listened-to, afternoon-drive-time news radio program and reporting on stories and happenings all over the globe. As a host, Siegel has reported from a variety of locations across Europe, the Middle East, North Africa and Asia.

In 2010, Siegel was recognized by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism with the John Chancellor Award. Siegel has been honored with three Silver Batons from Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia University, first in 1984 for All Things Considered's coverage of peace movements in East and West Germany. He shared in NPR's 1996 Silver Baton Award for "The Changing of the Guard: The Republican Revolution," for coverage of the first 100 days of the 104th Congress. He was part of the NPR team that won a Silver Baton for the network's coverage of the 2008 earthquake in Sichuan Province, China.

Other awards Siegel has earned include a 1997 American Bar Association's Silver Gavel Award for the two-part documentary, "Murder, Punishment, and Parole in Alabama" and the National Mental Health Association's 1991 Mental Health Award for his interviews conducted on the streets of New York in an All Things Considered story, "The Mentally Ill Homeless."

Siegel joined NPR in December 1976 as a newscaster and became an editor the following year. In 1979, Siegel became NPR's first staffer based overseas when he was chosen to open NPR's London bureau, where he worked as senior editor until 1983. After London, Siegel served for four years as director of the News and Information Department, overseeing production of NPR's newsmagazines All Things Considered and Morning Edition, as well as special events and other news programming. During his tenure, NPR launched its popular Saturday and Sunday newsmagazine Weekend Edition.

Before coming to NPR, Siegel worked for WRVR Radio in New York City as a reporter, host and news director. He was part of the WRVR team honored with an Armstrong Award for the series, "Rockefeller's Drug Law." Prior to WRVR, he was morning news reporter and telephone talk show host for WGLI Radio in Babylon, New York.

A graduate of New York's Stuyvesant High School and Columbia University, Siegel began his career in radio at Columbia's radio station, WKCR-FM. As a student he anchored coverage of the 1968 Columbia demonstrations and contributed to the work that earned the station an award from the Writers Guild of America East.

Siegel is the editor of The NPR Interviews 1994, The NPR Interviews 1995 and The NPR Interviews 1996, compilations of NPR's most popular radio conversations from each year.

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Parallels
5:38 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

For One Parliamentarian, A Stronger Jordan Is Key To Fighting ISIS

Jordan's election laws make it impossible for any one political party to build a strong bloc in Parliament. Observers say that's one reason for the country's weakness — and for the growing appeal of the messages used by militants of the self-proclaimed Islamic State.
Khalil Mazraawi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:42 pm

There's a election law implemented in 2010 in Jordan known as "one person, one vote" that advocates of reform and democratization there regard, surprisingly, as a big step backward.

That's because of the strong ties Jordanians feel to family, clan and tribe, says Omar Razzaz, an economist and banker in Amman, the Jordanian capital.

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Parallels
4:33 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

Jordan's Fuzzy Definition Of Free Speech

Lina Ejeilat helped found the Jordanian online magazine 7iber (pronounced 'Hebber'). While the government encourages free expression in principle, many strict regulations remain, as noted by the satirical chart next to her.
Art Silverman NPR

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 8:46 pm

Earlier this month, Jordan's Information Minister Mohammad Al-Momani told a conference that freedom of expression can contribute to stopping radicalization.

On the very same day, a military court in the capital Amman sentenced a man to 18 months in prison for a Facebook post that was seen as insulting a friendly country, the United Arab Emirates.

Momani spent years studying at Rice University in Houston, so he knows what Americans think of as free expression. But he sees it a little differently.

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Parallels
4:27 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Jordan's King Balances Threats Abroad And Critics At Home

Jordanians marched in the streets of the capital Amman on Feb. 6 to show solidarity with the family of a pilot killed by the Islamic State in Syria. Jordanians also expressed support for the king's decision to take part in the U.S.-led coalition against ISIS.
Muhammad Hamed Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 8:27 am

Jordan's King Abdullah has faced a delicate balancing act ever since he ascended the throne in 1999 following his father's death. His country shares borders with Iraq, Syria and Israel among others, and there always seems to be trouble in the neighborhood.

His latest challenge has been to convince Jordanians that it's in the country's interest to play a prominent role in the U.S.-led coalition against the self-declared Islamic State.

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Parallels
6:01 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

Jordan's Army Preps For A Bigger Role Against ISIS

Jordanian soldiers stand guard at the Iraq-Jordan border last year. Jordan also shares a border with Syria and has had to deal with a flood of refugees from both its neighbors over the past decade.
Jamal Nasrallah EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 4:55 pm

Jordan's King Abdullah was way out ahead of the people in his support of the war against the self-declared Islamic State, or ISIS. Many Jordanians used to say it was someone else's war even though it's only a 90-minute drive from the capital, Amman, north to the Syrian border.

But Jordanian opinions changed dramatically after the horrific video in which ISIS immolated a Jordanian pilot, Moaz Kassasbeh, who was captured back in December.

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History
4:09 pm
Mon January 19, 2015

Cold Casing: The Mystery Of The Long-Lost Winchester Rifle

Originally published on Mon January 19, 2015 7:32 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Here's a lost and found story. What we assume was lost more than a hundred years ago was a rifle. Archaeologist Eva Jensen found it during a survey in Nevada's Great Basin National Park. She was looking for Native American artifacts.

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Politics
4:59 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

In New Hampshire, Two Different Tales Of Scott Brown's State Jump

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 7:41 pm

The very close U.S. Senate race in New Hampshire could come down to where Republican challenger Scott Brown is from. While detractors say the former Massachusetts senator crossed the state line in search of a Senate seat, an unusually large number of New Hampshire voters are originally from out of state themselves.

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Environment
5:12 pm
Mon September 22, 2014

Calderon: End Fossil Fuel Subsidies, Create Carbon Tax

Originally published on Tue September 23, 2014 1:38 pm

Former Mexican President Felipe Calderon leads a group to encourage heads of state to propel climate change. He discusses the obstacles that block aggressive efforts to curb climate change.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Middle East
5:12 pm
Mon September 22, 2014

What's Turkey's Next Step In Fight Against ISIS?

Originally published on Mon September 22, 2014 5:40 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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National Security
9:25 pm
Thu September 11, 2014

Court Documents Show How NSA Leaned On Yahoo, How Yahoo Fought Back

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 9:00 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Sports
4:24 pm
Thu September 11, 2014

Former FBI Director To Investigate NFL's Handling Of Ray Rice Case

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 8:54 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
4:33 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

President Obama To Outline Strategy For Confronting ISIS

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 6:29 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
4:33 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

A New Brand Of Paul Gains Support In Iowa

Sen. Rand Paul meets with local Republicans in Hiawatha, Iowa. He's made three trips to the state this year.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 1:43 pm

It's still more than 15 months until the Iowa caucuses, and no one in the crowded field of Republicans with presidential ambitions has announced. But things are already happening in Iowa, especially for Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky.

Paul has reached out to Iowans who never considered voting for his father, Ron Paul, who made a respectable third-place showing there in 2012.

He's still popular with his father's old supporters. Many of them are in the so-called liberty faction of the Iowa GOP.

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Politics
4:16 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Back In Session, Congress Faces Budget Bill, ISIS Threat

Originally published on Mon September 8, 2014 6:39 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Iraq
4:09 pm
Wed August 27, 2014

Sunni Moderates May Be Key To Turning Back ISIS Extremists

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 7:29 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Middle East
4:45 pm
Tue August 26, 2014

Long-Term Cease-Fire Brings Halt To Fighting In Gaza

Originally published on Tue August 26, 2014 8:07 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Media
4:06 pm
Mon August 25, 2014

In Plagiarism And Lost Posts, BuzzFeed's Strained Journalistic Evolution

Originally published on Mon August 25, 2014 7:53 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Law
8:02 pm
Fri August 15, 2014

Grand Jury Indicts Texas Gov. Rick Perry On Charges Of Abusing Power

Originally published on Fri August 15, 2014 8:12 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

From Our Listeners
4:23 pm
Wed August 13, 2014

Letters: A Paper Route Ride Along And Comforting Words From An IT Man

Originally published on Wed August 13, 2014 9:14 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Research News
5:20 pm
Tue August 12, 2014

In 'Um' Or 'Uh,' A Few Clues To What We're Saying — And Who's Saying It

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 11:11 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

When we're searching for the right word to say, or we don't know what to say or how to say something, this happens.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED PEOPLE: Um - uh...

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Iraq
4:09 pm
Tue August 12, 2014

U.S. Response In Iraq: From Emergency Solution To Slate Of Paths Forward

Originally published on Tue August 12, 2014 9:45 pm

The U.S. has begun airlifting humanitarian aid and conducting limited airstrikes in the attempt to protect Iraq's refugee populations of religious minorities. NPR's Tom Bowman talks with Robert Siegel about the possible policy options for the U.S. in Iraq.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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