Ask Me Another
3:38 pm
Wed September 25, 2013

Triple Word Score

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

And we've got our next two contestants, Jon Early and David Schmidt.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Two fascinating guys. Jon teaches at science camp.

JON EARLY: Very much so. Yeah.

EISENBERG: What do you teach specifically at science camp?

EARLY: Well, today we made egg drops. Basically you just drop eggs off buildings. And I find an excuse to do it. So there we go. It teaches physics or something.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: That sounds very fun. Now, David, you grew up in Colonial Williamsburg?

DAVID SCHMIDT: Oh, yeah.

EISENBERG: In Colonial...

SCHMIDT: The original center is 1774.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: How did that affect your life?

SCHMIDT: Well, there's lots of pictures of me wearing short pants with stockings.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: No.

SCHMIDT: Buckles on my shoes. I know how to churn butter.

EISENBERG: Well, the song that Jonathan Coulton just played, "Money, Money, Money," is the perfect example of our next game which is titled Triple Word Score. Jonathan, what's going on here?

JONATHAN COULTON: Yes. That's right. This game is about words that get repeated three times. The word nerds in our audience will know this as the literary device epizeuxis which is repetition of a word for rhetorical effect, effect, effect.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: So, John, will you give us an example of this, please?

JOHN CHANESKI, PUZZLE GURU: Yes. An example of epizeuxis. If we said Beyonce had her first number one hit in 1999 with Destiny's Child, thanks to what song about trifling men who cannot repay debts, the answer would be "Bills, Bills, Bills."

COULTON: Got it. Does that make sense? Yeah. All right.

SCHMIDT: I grew up in 1774.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: Yeah. It's going to be hard for you.

SCHMIDT: Yeah.

COULTON: We do recommend that if you are a time traveler you not come on our show because...

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: So ring in when you know the answer. In nursery rhymes what is the preferred method for getting a boat gently down the stream?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: David.

SCHMIDT: Merrily, merrily, merrily.

COULTON: I'm sorry; that is actually - technically, that is not a method for getting a boat down a stream.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: That is just a description of how you might do it. Jon, do you have a...

EARLY: What is row, row, row?

COULTON: That's right. Except that we are not on "Jeopardy!" so you don't...

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: This is interesting. One contestant is from a different time and one's on a different show.

(LAUGHTER)

SCHMIDT: Can I use a life line after this?

EISENBERG: No.

COULTON: All right. This is a musical clue. Complete the lyrics with a three word phrase featuring epizeuxis. This is a song from the past and, David, from your future.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I'm sorry. I'm interrupting. Because epizeuxis I'm now realizing sounds like a character from Colonial Williamsburg.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: Epizeuxis.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "FUN, FUN, FUN")

COULTON: (singing) Well, she got her daddy's car and she cruised through the hamburger stand now. So she forgot all about the library like she told her old man now. And with the radio blasting she was cruising just as fast as she can now. And she'll have...

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: David.

SCHMIDT: Fun, fun, fun.

COULTON: You got it.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: And episode of "Seinfeld" helped popularize what repetitive saying used to gloss over the details of a story?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: David.

SCHMIDT: Yadda, yadda, yadda?

COULTON: That's right.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: The Muppets character known as the Swedish Chef punctuates his usual gibberish with what three word catchphrase?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Jon.

EARLY: Verdy, verdy voo?

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Verdy, verdy voo?

EARLY: Verdy, verdy voo.

COULTON: Well, again, those are not all three the same word. David, do you want to take a crack at this one?

SCHMIDT: Not at all.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Anyone out there?

UNIDENTIFIED MEN AND WOMEN: Bork, bork, bork.

EISENBERG: Bork, bork, bork.

COULTON: Here's another musical clue.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "TURN, TURN, TURN")

COULTON: (singing) To everything, blah, blah, blah. There is a season, blah, blah, blah. And a time for every purpose under heaven.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: David.

SCHMIDT: Turn, turn, turn.

COULTON: You got it.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: All right. This is your last clue. The title of what 1970 movie about the attack on Pearl Harbor translates literally from the Japanese as "Tiger, Tiger, Tiger"?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: David.

SCHMIDT: "Tora, Tora, Tora."

COULTON: That's right.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: John Chaneski, how'd they do?

GURU: The winner, surprise, surprise, surprise, is David from Williamsburg. Congratulations, David.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Nice job, Jon. Thank you. David, you'll be moving on to our final showdown.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.