All Things Considered on Classical 89.3

Weekdays, 4pm - 6pm
Hosted By: Melissa Block, Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish

For two hours every weekday, All Things Considered hosts Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, and Audie Cornish present this NPR program's trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews and offbeat features.

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NPR Story
4:59 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Chuck Close Reflects On Learning School Lessons Through Art

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 5:46 pm

One of the superstar artists connected with the Turnaround Arts Initiative is painter Chuck Close. He says that when he was growing up, he had some teachers who had enough flexibility to allow him to paint a mural about Lewis and Clark, even though he would not do well on a test about it.

It's All Politics
4:49 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Background Check Battle: More Prosecution Or More Checks?

Vice President Joe Biden, holds a background check form last week in Washington, as he calls on Congress to pass legislation aimed at reducing gun violence.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 1:54 pm

One argument that some gun rights groups make against expanding background checks is that the federal government isn't doing a good enough job now of enforcing the law already on the books.

They point out that only a tiny fraction of people caught trying to buy a gun illegally are ever prosecuted.

But gun control supporters say that argument totally misses the point of background checks.

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Music Interviews
4:25 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Rachel Zeffira: An Opera 'Deserter' Embraces Dreamy Pop

Rachel Zeffira's debut solo album is titled The Deserters.
Yuval Hen Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu April 25, 2013 6:46 am

Listening to her ethereal sound, you might not guess that Rachel Zeffira was classically trained as an opera singer. But on her solo debut, The Deserters, she's not just singing: She also plays piano, synthesizers, vibraphone, cathedral organ, violin, viola, oboe and English horn.

Zeffira makes her home in London now, but she grew up in a small town in rural British Columbia and began playing music at a young age.

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Explosions At Boston Marathon
9:37 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

15-Block Area Secured As Crime Scene After Boston Attack

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 10:02 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And NPR's Tovia Smith joins us now from Boston. And, Tovia, let's recap the chronology just a little bit. Two explosions about 10 seconds apart, very close by at the finish line, correct?

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Explosions At Boston Marathon
9:37 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

At Least Three People Killed In Boston Attack

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 10:02 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

More than 100 people injured, and police now say at least three people killed by the explosions today at the Boston Marathon. Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick says the FBI is now leading multiply agencies in an investigation, and security has been tightened across Boston.

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Explosions At Boston Marathon
9:37 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Investigators Cautious About Providing Details In Boston Attack

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 10:02 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Investigators are gathering evidence related to the blasts. Law-enforcement officials have been cautious about providing any details. NPR's counterterrorism correspondent Dina Temple-Raston is here with the latest. And Dina, do investigators have any leads?

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U.S.
6:06 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

An Update On The Boston Marathon Explosions

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 10:02 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. We begin this hour with the horrific story unfolding today out of Boston. Just over four hours into the Boston Marathon, two explosions ripped into a crowd of onlookers and runners not far from the finish line. Boston Police have confirmed at least two people dead, and 23 injured. Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick spoke just moments ago, along with the city's police commissioner, Ed Davis.

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All Tech Considered
4:50 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Speak Up! Advertisers Want You To Talk With New Apps

Drinks columnist David Wondrich is seen on Esquire's new Talk to Esquire app, which allows users to interact with several of the magazine's columnists through voice recognition.
Screengrab via YouTube

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 10:02 pm

Imagine for a second what it would be like if you could talk to your radio, and your radio would actually listen. To get an idea of what this might be like, I downloaded an app called Talk to Esquire, from the magazine of the same name.

When I opened it, the app asked me a question: What's your favorite type of liquor? That's a little forward, but it's Esquire so I played along and told the app that I'm more of a beer drinker.

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Around the Nation
4:46 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Exoneree Detectives Fight For Those Still Behind Bars

Dallas exonerees Christopher Scott (center) and Richard Miles, accompanied by Scott's girlfriend, Kelly Gindratt, prepare to be honored in the state Capitol in Austin, Texas, in March.
Courtesy of Jamie Meltzer Freedom Fighters Documentary

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 9:35 am

Christopher Scott, Johnnie Lindsey and Billy Smith drive down a desolate highway toward a prison in East Texas. They've all been there before, serving hard time — 63 years among the three of them.

But this time it's different. They're driving a Hummer. They're dressed to the nines. And they're on a mission. They aim to get an inmate out — a friend of Scott's named Jimmy O'Steen, aka Big O. But this will be a slow-motion prison break. Scott, Lindsey and Smith are all exonerated prisoners.

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Code Switch
4:26 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Dumbfoundead: A Rising Star In A Genre In Transition

Korean American rap artist, Dumbfoundead performs at the Howard Theatre in Washington, D.C., on March 26.
Lauren Rock for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 10:02 pm

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Music Interviews
4:57 pm
Sun April 14, 2013

Nick Drake's Producer Remembers 'A Real Musician's Musician'

The cover photo from Nick Drake's 1969 debut, Five Leaves Left, produced by Joe Boyd.
Album cover

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 11:33 pm

English folk musician Nick Drake died decades before the song "Pink Moon" found him a wide audience, thanks to a series of Volkswagen ads back in 1999. They sparked a resurgence of interest in Drake's work — music largely ignored in his day but now inspiring legions of young musicians.

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World
4:52 pm
Sun April 14, 2013

As Arctic Ice Melts, It's A Free-For-All For Oil ... And Tusks

After being frozen for thousands of years in a Siberian riverbed, this pristine mammoth tusk is a financial boon to the hunter who found it.
Evgenia Arbugaeva National Geographic Magazine

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 11:47 am

It's widely known that the world's icecaps are melting. While most people are focused on what we're losing, some have considered what might be gained by the disappearance of all that ice.

In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey released a report estimating that 13 percent of the world's remaining undiscovered oil and 30 percent of the remaining undiscovered natural gas could be in the Arctic.

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NPR Story
4:52 pm
Sun April 14, 2013

Is Immigration Overhaul On America's Doorstep?

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

Coming up, the death of a man who could be the most influential pastor you've never heard of. But first, in Spanish, the words el camino means the road, but it can also mean the way. El camino rios, the way to the river. El camino de dias, a religious path.

And for millions, certainly the path to immigration overhaul in the U.S. has been elusive and full of fervor. Witness a rally this past week at the Capitol.

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NPR Story
4:52 pm
Sun April 14, 2013

Street Artists Protest Status Quo In Haiti

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

You're listening to WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

In Haiti, a group of artists is making a name for themselves by creating huge metal sculptures and showing them on the streets. They call themselves Haiti's Resistance Artists, and their work speaks to the devastation following the 2010 earthquake and the stark separation between the country's rich and poor. Reese Erlich has their story.

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Music Interviews
6:27 pm
Sat April 13, 2013

Thao Nguyen's Musical Life Is Far From 'Common'

Thao & The Get Down Stay Down's new album is titled We The Common.
Nick Walker Courtesy of the artist

Thao Nguyen, of the folk-rock group Thao & the Get Down Stay Down, has been on a musical journey since she started performing in her teens in Northern Virginia. Delicate yet fierce in her vocal delivery, she writes often about her social concerns — and it was a trip to a California women's prison that inspired much of her latest album, We the Common.

Ngyuen and her band are on the road for the first time in several years; she spoke with NPR's Jacki Lyden from a tour stop in Kansas City.

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Movies
5:43 pm
Sat April 13, 2013

Jurassic Bark: How Sound Design Changed Our Imaginations

A single trumpet from a baby elephant at the San Francisco Zoo was used for every single T. Rex roar in Jurassic Park.
Universal Pictures

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 8:15 pm

Nobody actually knows what dinosaurs sound like. But if you can imagine the roar of a T. Rex or the bellow of a brachiosaurus, it's probably thanks to the 1993 blockbuster Jurassic Park, which turns 20 this summer.

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All Tech Considered
5:11 pm
Sat April 13, 2013

When Digital Dust Is Gathered, Constellation May Be Muddled

The Orion nebula is the brightest spot in the sword of the Orion, or the Hunter constellation.
NASA

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 6:09 pm

That constellation of information known as Big Data can be a sight to behold.

Adam Frank of NPR's 13.7 blog explains Big Data as "the ability to understand (and control) a seemingly chaotic world on levels never before imagined."

Big Data is like gathering digital dust, says New Yorker tech blogger Gary Marcus. "It's a very valuable tool," he says, "but it's rarely the whole solution by itself."

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Politics
5:02 pm
Sat April 13, 2013

Week In News: Guns In U.S., Threats Abroad

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 6:09 pm

The gun control debate continued to dominate the news this week with President Obama coming out strongly in support of reforming the current gun control laws alongside the Newtown families. Host Jacki Lyden speaks with James Fallows, national correspondent with The Atlantic, about that story along with the bird flu in China, North Korea and the Postal Service.

Sports
5:02 pm
Sat April 13, 2013

Down To The Putt: Golf Analytics Gain Traction

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 6:09 pm

Numbers crunching has become a big deal in sports. Analytics have been slower to take hold in the tradition-bound game of golf, but it is happening. NPR's Tom Goldman reports on the phenomenon from the tournament most steeped in tradition, the Masters.

Dance
5:02 pm
Sat April 13, 2013

'First American Ballet Star' Soared To Fame With 'Firebird'

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 6:09 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

The dancer who brought "Firebird" and "The Nutcracker" to life at the New York City Ballet died this week. Maria Tallchief was one of America's great prima ballerinas. NPR's Joel Rose has this remembrance.

JOEL ROSE, BYLINE: Maria Tallchief soared to fame in 1949 when she danced the lead role in Stravinsky's "Firebird" in a production choreographed by George Balanchine.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED INTERVIEW)

MARIA TALLCHIEF: He was a poet. And he taught us how to react and to become this poetry.

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