All Things Considered on Classical 89.3

Weekdays, 4pm - 6pm
Hosted By: Melissa Block, Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish

For two hours every weekday, All Things Considered hosts Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, and Audie Cornish present this NPR program's trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews and offbeat features.

Local Host(s): 
George Olsen - golsen@publicradioeast.org
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Sports
5:10 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

American Pastime's Season Starts Off, In Australia

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 6:34 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

So long winter, so long spring training, the American past time gets back in full swing on Sunday and Monday, as Major League baseball begins around the country. But actually, officially speaking, it began already halfway around the world on a cricket ground in Australia. That's where the Los Angeles Dodgers won two games from the Arizona Diamondbacks.

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Parallels
4:32 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Iranians Begin To Feel The Heavy Burden Of Syria's War

A man looks at an unexploded barrel bomb that landed in a cemetery after being dropped by forces loyal to Syria's President Bashar Assad in the northern Syrian city of Aleppo on Thursday.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 4:04 pm

The Syrian civil war has been a major headache for President Obama. Critics at home and abroad, like Saudi Arabia, where the president was on Friday, have urged the U.S. to do more.

But the U.S. isn't the only country that's faced difficult choices over Syria. Iran and Syria have been close allies for decades. And in Iran, discussions about Syria are surprisingly frank, complex and demonstrate growing divisions over how to handle a costly war that has no end in sight.

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Shots - Health News
6:01 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

How Being Ignored Helped A Woman Discover The Breast Cancer Gene

Mary-Claire King says obscurity gave her the freedom to spend years looking for breast cancer genes.
Mary Levin/University of Washington

Originally published on Sun March 30, 2014 9:17 am

Back in the 1970s, a geneticist named Mary-Claire King decided she needed to figure out why women in some families were much more likely to get breast cancer.

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Middle East
5:05 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

President Prepares To Meet King As U.S.-Saudi Divisions Deepen

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 7:03 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Politics
5:05 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Voting Rights Fight Takes New Direction

An election official checks a voter's photo identification at an early-voting polling site in Austin, Texas.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 7:03 pm

It's that time again, when primary voters start casting their ballots for the midterm elections. As in recent years, voters face new rules and restrictions, including the need in 16 states to show a photo ID.

But this year, some voting rights activists say they're seeing a change — fewer new restrictions and, in some places, even a hint of bipartisanship.

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Book Reviews
5:05 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Book Review: 'How To Dance As The Roof Caves In'

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 6:25 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Making poetry out of something as messy as the recent housing crisis may sound like a tall order, but Nick Lantz has done it. The collection is called "How to Dance as the Roof Caves In." Our reviewer, Tess Taylor says calls it biting but tender.

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Shots - Health News
4:14 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Custom Chromo: First Yeast Chromosome Built From Scratch

The research team used yeast chromosome No. 3 as the model for their biochemical stitchery. Pins and white diamonds in the illustration represent "designer changes" not found in the usual No. 3; yellow stretches represent deletions.
Lucy Reading-Ikkanda

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 7:03 pm

Using the labor of dozens of undergraduate students, scientists have built a customized yeast chromosome from scratch.

It's a milestone in the rapidly growing field of synthetic biology, where organisms can be tailored for industrial use. In this case, the near-term goal is to understand the genetics of yeast, and eventually the genetics of us.

This was quite an undertaking. Yeast have about 6,000 genes packed in 16 tidy bundles called chromosomes. Each chromosome is an enormous molecule of DNA packed in proteins.

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History
4:12 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

When A Record Quake Struck Alaska, One Small Church Survived

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 7:03 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Fifty years ago today, the most powerful recorded earthquake in North American history struck Alaska. The quake, which measured 9.2 on the Richter scale, was also the second largest in recorded history. The trembler and the ensuing tsunami resulted in 30 deaths and caused massive destruction, including landslides that destroyed scores of city blocks in Anchorage.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Politics
4:12 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Internal Report Clears Christie Of Bridgegate, But Dems Don't Buy It

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 7:03 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

We now have the results of an internal investigation into the George Washington Bridge lane closure scandal. Today's report was commissioned by the administration of New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, and it finds the governor did nothing wrong. It won't be the last word. Critics question the report's credibility, as NPR's Joel Rose reports.

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All Tech Considered
6:56 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

From The Birth Of The iPhone To An Era Of Lawsuits

One of the earliest iPhone prototypes. This system was pieced together to test early versions of the iPhone's software.
Courtesy of Apple

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 8:24 pm

Next week Apple and Samsung are heading back to court. The two technology giants have been locked in an ongoing patent battle for years.

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Shots - Health News
6:56 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Brain Changes Suggest Autism Starts In The Womb

Researchers say intervention in early childhood may help the developing brain compensate by rewiring to work around the trouble spots.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 11:03 am

The symptoms of autism may not be obvious until a child is a toddler, but the disorder itself appears to begin well before birth.

Brain tissue taken from children who died and also happened to have autism revealed patches of disorganization in the cortex, a thin sheet of cells that's critical for learning and memory, researchers report in the New England Journal of Medicine. Tissue samples from children without autism didn't have those characteristic patches.

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Books
6:14 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

In Karen Russell's World, Sleep Is For The Lucky Few

cover detail
Atavist Books

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 10:14 am

Getting much sleep lately? The citizens of Karen Russell's dystopian novella, Sleep Donation, haven't been getting any. It's the near future, and America has been suffering from an insomnia crisis where hundreds of thousands of cases are terminal. And so an agency called Slumber Corps has been established to battle the problem.

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Sports
5:51 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

NLRB Sides With College Football Players Hoping To Unionize

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 8:24 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

A ruling by the National Labor Relations Board today could really shake up big-money college sports. The board took the first step in favor of allowing Northwestern University's football players to unionize. A regional director for the board ruled that these college athletes meet the definition of university employees under federal law.

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Book News & Features
5:38 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

It Was The Best Of Sentences ...

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 2:41 pm

Have you ever had a sentence stop you in your tracks? Editors at The American Scholar magazine have put out their list of the "Ten Best Sentences" in fiction and nonfiction. Associate editor Margaret Foster says the inspiration came from water cooler talk around the office.

"We're sometimes struck by a beautiful sentence or maybe a lousy sentence, and we'll just say, 'Hey, listen to this,' " she says.

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U.S.
4:56 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Protesters Want To Sue Secret Service: Do They Have The Right?

A 2004 case involving the Secret Service made its way to the Supreme Court Wednesday. Demonstrators want to sue for being moved away from then-President George W. Bush.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 8:24 pm

On a day when three of President Obama's Secret Service agents were put on leave for "disciplinary reasons," the agency came under scrutiny in the U.S. Supreme Court for a separate incident.

The court heard arguments in a case testing whether Secret Service agents can be sued for moving a group of protesters out of earshot of President George W. Bush in 2004.

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All Tech Considered
4:31 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Backlash To Facebook Buying Virtual Reality Firm Comes Swiftly

Attendees wear Oculus Rift HD virtual reality headsets at the Consumer Electronics Show in January.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 11:08 am

When Facebook purchases a company, you can often hear a collective groan go around the Internet — "There goes the neighborhood."

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Shots - Health News
4:25 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

That Health Insurance Deadline Now Comes With Wiggle Room

Christine Moyer checks out options at a health insurance enrollment fair on March 18 in San Francisco.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 8:24 pm

We're just five days away from the March 31 deadline to sign up for individual health insurance under the Affordable Care Act. For weeks, administration officials, including the president, have insisted that there would be no extensions to the scheduled end of the six-month open enrollment period.

But now there's some wiggle room. Let's review, shall we?

Start with the key question: Is Monday still the deadline?

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Media
5:06 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

Resignation Revives Doubts About Bloomberg China Coverage

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 7:28 pm

Bloomberg News finds itself under unwelcome scrutiny once again, as its parent company's chairman suggests that reporting on the corruption of China ruling elites isn't part of its core mission. A key China editor also revealed this week that he had quit Bloomberg in protest of a decision not to publish a subsequent investigation.

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The Salt
4:28 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

In Ranchers Vs. Weeds, Climate Change Gives Weeds An Edge

A tall, rubbery weed with golden flowers Dalmatian toadflax is encroaching on grasslands in 32 U.S. states.
pverdonk/Flickr

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 7:28 pm

Most climate models paint a bleak picture of the Great Plains a century from now as a hot region besieged by heavy rainstorms and flooding.

And new studies suggest that climate change may bring farmers another headache: more invasive plants.

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Global Health
4:16 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

The Sources And Symptoms Of A Disease With A Global Reputation

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 7:28 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Some facts now about the Ebola virus. It was discovered in 1976 after an outbreak in Zaire, which was the name then of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. There are five strains, named for the site of the outbreak where they were first identified. So the outbreak in Guinea is of the Zaire strain. The other strains are Sudan, Ivory Coast, Bundibugyo - that's in Uganda - and Reston. That's in northern Virginia.

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