All Things Considered on Classical 89.3

Weekdays, 4pm - 6pm
Hosted By: Melissa Block, Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish

For two hours every weekday, All Things Considered hosts Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, and Audie Cornish present this NPR program's trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews and offbeat features.

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NPR Story
4:34 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Washington Pot Shops Open Doors, A Moment 2 Years In The Making

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 6:13 pm

Washington state's first recreational pot shops open for business Tuesday. Voters there legalized the sale of marijuana for non-medical use back in 2012. The Northwest News Network's Austin Jenkins reports on the lengthy process from that vote to the day's store openings.

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Afghanistan
4:13 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Early Vote Tallies Speed The Sparring Between Afghan Candidates

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 6:13 pm

Preliminary voting tallies in the Afghan presidential election, released Monday, did little to ease a brewing political crisis. The losing candidate continued to claim fraud, declaring himself the winner instead. Meanwhile, the U.S. is warning of a power grab.

Book Your Trip
4:13 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

In 'Little Engine That Could,' Some See An Early Feminist Hero

Was "I think I can" the great-grandmother of "lean in?" Some readers see the plucky locomotive as a parable about working women, but some versions of the story feature a male protagonist instead.
Platt & Munk, Penguin Young Readers Group

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 8:23 pm

"Chug, chug, chug. Puff, puff, puff. Ding-dong, ding-dong."

The beloved tale of the little blue engine — who helps bring a broken-down train of toys to the good little boys and girls on the other side of the mountain — has been chugging along for a very long time. But despite the locomotive's optimistic refrain — I think I can, I think I can, I think I can — the story has a somewhat checkered past: In its tracks, The Little Engine has left both a legal battle and a debate over whether the little blue engine is male or female.

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Men In America
5:47 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Teen Tries To Be The Parent His Own Dad Never Was

Marvin Ramos, now 18, was overwhelmed when his daughter, Hailey, was born. But now he says he's determined to be the best father he can be. "I haven't run away," he says, "and I never want to."
Marvin Ramos Courtesy of WNYC

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 8:40 pm

This story is part of All Things Considered's "Men in America" series.

Marvin Ramos found out he was going to be a father when his girlfriend, Stephanie, called him during a basketball game. He says he sat down on a bench and looked up at the sky. He was 16. Stephanie was 19.

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Book Reviews
5:27 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Post-Apocalyptic World Falls Flat In 'California'

Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 11:49 am

Edan Lepucki's debut, California, sold thousands of copies even before the official publication date when talk-show host Stephen Colbert urged readers to pre-order it from a national independent chain as a protest against the "books-and-everything else" giant, Amazon.

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The Salt
4:53 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Couple Revives Lost Moroccan Fig Liquor, One Bottle At A Time

Bottles of mahia in the Nahmias et Fils distillery.
Alex Schmidt for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 7:56 pm

Before the crowds descend on the Whisky Jewbilee, a kosher alcohol tasting event in Manhattan, David and Dorit Nahmias stand behind their vendor table, getting psyched up.

"This is like the big game," Dorit Nahmias says.

Events like these are a key tool for getting the word out about their tiny distillery, and the Nahmiases attend half a dozen of them per year. The product they're trying to sell is one few people have heard of: mahia. Dorit rehearses her pitch:

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Politics
4:53 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

In Maine, A Gay Candidate With An Uneven Record On LGBT Rights

Democratic Rep. Mike Michaud speaks at the Pride Parade and Festival in Portland, Maine, on June 21. Michaud, who is openly gay, is running for governor with the backing of national LGBT groups.
Susan Sharon NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 7:56 pm

Maine was among the first states to legalize same-sex marriage at the ballot box — and now, LGBT groups are hoping voters there will break new ground by electing the nation's first openly gay governor in November.

But Democratic candidate Mike Michaud only recently came out, and he hasn't always been a gay-rights supporter.

Responding to what he called a "whisper campaign" about his sexual orientation, the six-term congressman did something dramatic last November: He outed himself in a series of newspaper op-eds.

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Afghanistan
4:53 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Afghan Election Numbers Come With A Warning: Results Not Final

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 7:56 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel. Today, Afghans are one step closer to knowing who their next president will be. More than three weeks after voters went to the polls, election officials announced that candidate Ashraf Ghani has a wide lead. But Ghani is not out of the woods yet. The election process now enters an appeals phase that is sure to be contentious before the final results are announced on July 24. NPR's Sean Carberry sent this story from Kabul.

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Sports
4:07 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Nil-ism In America: When You Stare At The Pitch, The Pitch Stares Back

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 7:56 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Recipes
4:07 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Whipping Up A Second Serving Of Atlantic Beach Pie

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 7:56 pm

In an encore installment of our Found Recipes series, cookbook writer Katie Workman talks about an amazing citrus and whipped cream pie called "Atlantic Beach Pie," which she had at Crook's Corner in North Carolina. Bill Smith, the restaurant's chef, also explains pie's origins.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Religion
4:07 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Pope Meets Sex Abuse Victims, Bearing A Plea For Forgiveness

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 7:56 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

At the Vatican today Pope Francis had his first meeting with victims of clergy. He vowed to hold bishops accountable for the protection of children. The meeting came nearly 16 months after Francis was elected. Victim support groups said it was long overdue. For more on this NPR's Sylvia Poggioli joins us from Rome. Hello Sylvia.

SYLVIA POGGIOLI, BYLINE: Hello, Robert.

SIEGEL: And I understand the Pope held a Mass with these victims, including a dramatic homily. What did he say?

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Around the Nation
6:56 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Programs Target Poverty In Obama's 5 'Promise Zones'

People line up at the FamilySource Center in Los Angeles, an organization in one of President Obama's five designated "Promise Zones" that aims to help fight poverty in the area.
Priska Neely NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 11:02 am

Five areas across the country have been designated as "Promise Zones" by the federal government. These zones, announced by President Obama in January, are intended to tackle poverty by focusing on individual urban neighborhoods and rural areas.

In the five Promise Zones — located in Philadelphia, San Antonio, southeastern Kentucky, the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma and Los Angeles — the idea is to basically carpet-bomb the neighborhoods with programs like after-school classes, GED courses and job training to turn those areas around.

What Happens In The Zone?

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Movie Interviews
5:18 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

The Life And Death Of 'The Internet's Own Boy'

Aaron Swartz was heavily involved in the popular 2012 campaign to prevent the passage of the federal Stop Online Piracy Act, or SOPA.
Quinn Norton Falco Ink Publicity

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 8:48 am

Aaron Swartz was a programmer, a hacker, a freedom of information activist — and a casualty of suicide.

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Middle East
5:05 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Six Israeli Youths Arrested In Death Of Palestinian Teen

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 6:51 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Israel arrested six Israeli Jewish suspects today in connection with the kidnapping and murder of a 16-year-old Palestinian teenager. It's the first major development in a case that's sparked riots in Jerusalem and Arab towns in Israel. The teenager was seized from his home in East Jerusalem last week, and his charred body was found in a nearby forest. Officials say the autopsy shows he was burned to death.

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Music Interviews
5:05 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Years After 'The Killing Moon,' Echo & The Bunnymen Still At It

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 6:55 pm

The band Echo & The Bunnymen has released its first new album in five years, called Meteorites. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks with frontman Ian McCulloch about the release.

U.S.
5:05 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Increasing Use Of Oil Trains Inspires Backlash From States

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 12:18 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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Law
5:42 pm
Sat July 5, 2014

More Municipalities Deny Federal Requests, Won't Detain Immigrants

Philadelphia City Councilwoman Maria Quinones-Sanchez pushed for the city to change its practice of detaining immigrants on behalf of federal officials.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 10:42 am

Before immigrants get deported, they are sometimes held temporarily by local law enforcement at the request of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE. But cities across the country, including Philadelphia, are saying they will no longer fully cooperate with that plan.

Offenses including traffic stops and felonies can lead to deportation for immigrants who entered the U.S. illegally — or even those who are legal permanent residents. ICE requests that municipalities hold suspects until they can be transferred into federal custody.

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Author Interviews
5:14 pm
Sat July 5, 2014

Release Of 'Echo's Bones' Resurrects Beckett's Rejected Work

Playwright and writer Samuel Beckett, shown here around 1970, wrote Echo's Bones at his editor's request — only to have it cut from his first collection.
Reg Lancaster Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 5, 2014 7:14 pm

Playwright and author Samuel Beckett, who died 25 years ago, wrote lasting works of literature like Waiting for Godot and Endgame. But a previously unpublished short story of his — now being released for the first time — was not so appreciated.

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Sports
5:06 pm
Sat July 5, 2014

Down Two Key Players, Brazilians Worry About World Cup Prospects

Originally published on Sat July 5, 2014 7:14 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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Music Interviews
5:06 pm
Sat July 5, 2014

Longtime Rockers NRBQ Get Down To 'Brass Tacks' In New Album

Originally published on Sat July 5, 2014 7:14 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

We're back with ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Kelly McEvers.

(SOUNDBITE OF NEW RHYTHM AND BLUES QUARTET SONG)

NRBQ: (Singing) Why don't you sit in my lap, kiss me and give me a hug. You know that I'm thinking of...

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