All Things Considered on Classical 89.3

Weekdays, 4pm - 6pm
Hosted By: Melissa Block, Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish

For two hours every weekday, All Things Considered hosts Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, and Audie Cornish present this NPR program's trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews and offbeat features.

Local Host(s): 
George Olsen - golsen@publicradioeast.org
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Law
5:42 pm
Sat July 5, 2014

More Municipalities Deny Federal Requests, Won't Detain Immigrants

Philadelphia City Councilwoman Maria Quinones-Sanchez pushed for the city to change its practice of detaining immigrants on behalf of federal officials.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 10:42 am

Before immigrants get deported, they are sometimes held temporarily by local law enforcement at the request of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE. But cities across the country, including Philadelphia, are saying they will no longer fully cooperate with that plan.

Offenses including traffic stops and felonies can lead to deportation for immigrants who entered the U.S. illegally — or even those who are legal permanent residents. ICE requests that municipalities hold suspects until they can be transferred into federal custody.

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Author Interviews
5:14 pm
Sat July 5, 2014

Release Of 'Echo's Bones' Resurrects Beckett's Rejected Work

Playwright and writer Samuel Beckett, shown here around 1970, wrote Echo's Bones at his editor's request — only to have it cut from his first collection.
Reg Lancaster Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 5, 2014 7:14 pm

Playwright and author Samuel Beckett, who died 25 years ago, wrote lasting works of literature like Waiting for Godot and Endgame. But a previously unpublished short story of his — now being released for the first time — was not so appreciated.

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Sports
5:06 pm
Sat July 5, 2014

Down Two Key Players, Brazilians Worry About World Cup Prospects

Originally published on Sat July 5, 2014 7:14 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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Music Interviews
5:06 pm
Sat July 5, 2014

Longtime Rockers NRBQ Get Down To 'Brass Tacks' In New Album

Originally published on Sat July 5, 2014 7:14 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

We're back with ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Kelly McEvers.

(SOUNDBITE OF NEW RHYTHM AND BLUES QUARTET SONG)

NRBQ: (Singing) Why don't you sit in my lap, kiss me and give me a hug. You know that I'm thinking of...

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Technology
5:06 pm
Sat July 5, 2014

From Thermostats To Prison Security, More Things Going Online

Originally published on Sat July 5, 2014 7:14 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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Energy
6:54 pm
Fri July 4, 2014

'Hell Must Look Like This': A Grueling Year For Train-Struck Town

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 6:27 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This weekend marks one year since a deadly train derailment in eastern Canada that killed 47 people. A U.S.-owned tanker train filled with oil from North Dakota derailed, sending plumes of fire through a small Quebec town. The explosion destroyed or contaminated much of the business district. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann reports that residents are still sorting out what parts of their lives and their community can be rebuilt.

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Shots - Health News
5:33 pm
Fri July 4, 2014

As A Husband Becomes Caregiver To His Wife, A Marriage Evolves

Rick and Marianne wash dishes together. She no longer remembers that he is her husband.
Andrew Nixon Capital Public Radio

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 7:56 am

When Rick Rayburn retired from the California State Parks system, he had his heart set on balmy days of gardening, playing tennis and traveling to France with his wife, Marianne.

But then, about three years ago, she was diagnosed with dementia. It disrupted the couple's lives from top to bottom, right on the cusp of retirement. At 67, Rick has taken on a big new role.

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Middle East
4:00 pm
Fri July 4, 2014

Jerusalem Is Roiled By Violence In A Third Day Of Clashes

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 6:27 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

There was a third straight day of clashes between Israelis and Palestinians in Jerusalem today. The violence comes as Palestinians buried a teenage boy who had been kidnapped and found dead in a forest. Police are still investigating but Palestinians believe that the boy's killing was a revenge attack after three Israeli teens were abducted and killed. A crime Israel blames on Hamas. Daniel Estrin reports from Jerusalem.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

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Latin America
4:00 pm
Fri July 4, 2014

Graffiti Artist Sprays Brazil's Turmoil Across Its City Walls

Paulo Ito's picture of a starving child left to dine on a soccer ball has been shared more than 50,000 times on Facebook.
Andre Penner AP

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 6:27 pm

Brazilian street artist Paulo Ito has captured the spirit of the World Cup with two controversial images: One depicts a starving Brazilian boy with nothing but a soccer ball to eat; the other depicts even protesters watching the games on television. They both speak to viewers worldwide about the costs of staging the mega event. Ito explains what inspired his work and what's happening in Brazil.

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Sports
4:00 pm
Fri July 4, 2014

Continental Rivals Take Spotlight In World Cup Quarters

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 6:27 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In Brazil, tears of joy and relief as the World Cup home team won its quarterfinal against Colombia.

(CHEERING)

SIEGEL: Brazil beat Colombia 2-1 in a hard-fought game between the two South American neighbors, but as we'll hear, it was a costly victory. An earlier game today - Germany defeated France 1-nothing to move on to the World Cup final four. NPR's Tom Goldman is in Rio de Janeiro, and he joins us now. And, Tom, first of all, Brazil won. But in a way, it also lost. Tell us about that.

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Music Reviews
4:00 pm
Fri July 4, 2014

Album Review: 'We Are All Young Together'

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 1:39 pm

Keyboard player Walter Martin is best known for his part in the indie band The Walkmen. After the group took a break last year, though, Martin ventured into kids music. Reviewer Stefan Shepherd says Martin's solo debut, We Are All Young Together, is surprising, sweet and playful.

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Law
5:31 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Top NYPD Cop: Stop-And-Frisk Is Not 'The Problem Or The Solution'

The NYPD recently launched a study into what's causing a rise in shootings in the city. Commissioner William Bratton says it will examine a lot of factors, not just stop-and-frisk.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 6:41 pm

It's been nearly a year since a court ruling curtailed the New York Police Department's controversial practice known as stop-and-frisk, but NYPD Commissioner William Bratton says the city can be just as safe without it.

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NPR Ed
5:19 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Coaching First-Generation Students Through College

Originally published on Fri July 4, 2014 6:08 am

One-third of college students are the first in their families to enroll in college. But few of them graduate within six years, according to the Department of Education.

One program is working to change that, one student at a time. Juma Ventures isn't just trying to get kids into college ... it's trying to get them through it.

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All Tech Considered
5:19 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

In A Battle For Web Traffic, Bad Bots Are Going After Grandma

By hijacking a user's computer, "bad" bots make it look as if she visits a website often, thus making the site more valuable to advertisers.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 11:05 am

As the Web turns 25, it's becoming a terrific place if you're a bot.

It began as a tool for human communication, but now, over 60 percent of the traffic on the Web is automated applications called bots talking to other bots, according to one study. And experts say about half of those bots are bad.

But first let's talk about the good bots.

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Latin America
4:42 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Tiny Costa Rica Is A World Cup Surprise — Even To Its Own Fans

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 6:26 pm

Costa Rica entered into the World Cup an underdog, but the team has emerged from group play having beaten three former World Cup winners. Costa Rican fan Ericka Mora speaks with Melissa Block from San Jose about the excitement in the country's capital.

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Iraq
4:25 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

If Map Of Middle East Is Being Redrawn, What Lies Ahead For Kurds?

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 6:26 pm

Violence in Iraq has many wondering if the map of the Middle East is being redrawn before the world's eyes. If so, Iraqi Kurds might stand to gain, with an independent Kurdistan finally within reach. Fuad Hussein, a strategist for the Kurdistan Regional Government, joins Robert Siegel to speak about Kurds' hopes and fears.

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Law
4:09 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

When Child Migrants Cross The Border, What Next Awaits Them?

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 6:26 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The influx of children coming up from Central America, through Mexico and across the U.S. border, has focused attention on U.S. immigration law and how it's applied. We're going to hear now from Dana Leigh Marks, who is an immigration judge. In fact, Judge Marks is president of the National Association of Immigration Judges. She joins us from San Francisco. Welcome to the program.

DANA LEIGH MARKS: Thank you so much for having me.

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Middle East
4:09 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Iran Nuclear Negotiations Try To Hurdle Impasse As Deadline Nears

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 6:26 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Iranian and American diplomats are facing a July 20th deadline to come up with a nuclear agreement. A deal could prevent any Iranian attempt to build a bomb. Failure could bring back the mutual hostility of the past. As NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Vienna, nuclear fuel, uranium, is the crucial issue.

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Environment
4:09 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Study: Surge In Okla. Quakes Can Be Traced To Drilling Operations

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 6:26 pm

StateImpact Oklahoma's Joe Wertz reports on a new study that links a "swarm" of earthquakes to four specific, high-volume oil and gas industry disposal wells. It's one of several reports that show oil and gas activity could be causing a rise in earthquake activity.

Book Reviews
6:22 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

A Writer Who Defied The System In 'The Zhivago Affair'

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 7:20 pm

What appeared in Soviet newspapers, magazines and books during the 1950s was processed through so many layers of censorship, that what ultimately emerged was mostly propaganda. Writers and poets who defied the system, went unpublished, lost their jobs and often their homes. Many were sent to the gulag, or died in the cellars of the KGB.

During the worst terror of the Stalin years, Boris Pasternak, the author of Dr. Zhivago, was left largely alone because, it was rumored, Stalin liked some of his poetry.

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