All Things Considered on Classical 89.3

Weekdays, 4pm - 6pm
Hosted By: Melissa Block, Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish

For two hours every weekday, All Things Considered hosts Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, and Audie Cornish present this NPR program's trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews and offbeat features.

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Shots - Health News
5:06 pm
Tue June 18, 2013

Patients Lead The Way As Medicine Grapples With Apps

How many calories in that bite? My Fitness Pal and other fitness and nutrition apps can help find the answer.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 10:39 pm

Christine Porter is hooked on the MyFitnessPal app. In October, after deciding to lose 50 pounds, Porter started typing in everything she eats, drinks and any exercise she gets.

"This is my main page here," says Porter. "It's telling me I have about 1,200 calories remaining for the day. When I want to record something I just click the 'add to diary' button. I'm on it all day either through my phone or through the computer."

She says she's lost 42 pounds in nine months.

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NPR Story
4:55 pm
Tue June 18, 2013

Letters: Mozart's Violin And The Price Of Potatoes

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 6:18 pm

Robert Siegel and Melissa Block read emails from listeners about Mozart's violin and the price of potatoes.

All Tech Considered
3:52 pm
Tue June 18, 2013

Mexico's Tech Startups Look To Overcome Barriers To Growth

Enrique Lima is a co-founder of Publish 88, a Mexican startup that develops software for publishing companies.
Mónica Ortiz Uribe for NPR

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 6:18 pm

In the past decade, Mexico's tech industry has flourished, growing three times faster than the global average. Most of that growth has been fueled by demand from the United States. But as Mexico's startups strive to make it in foreign markets, they say they need more engineers and ways to finance their growth.

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Music Reviews
1:25 pm
Tue June 18, 2013

Kanye's 'Yeezus' Packs A Bite

Kanye West at his album listening party at Milk Studios last week in New York City.
Shareif Ziyadat FilmMagic

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 6:18 pm

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The Salt
6:34 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

Dirty Spuds? Alleged Potato Cartel Accused Of Price Fixing

Clearly, he's as surprised by the allegations as the rest of us.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 4:09 pm

Editor's Note: Many of you noted that the price for a 10-pound bag of potatoes cited in the lawsuit seems ridiculously high. So we look into the matter further — you can read what we found in this follow-up post.

High-tech spying with satellites. Intimidation. Price fixing.

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Shots - Health News
6:03 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

The Human Voice May Not Spark Pleasure In Children With Autism

Instructional assistant Jessica Reeder touches her nose to get Jacob Day, 3, who has autism, to focus his attention on her during a therapy session in April 2007.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 11:31 am

The human voice appears to trigger pleasure circuits in the brains of typical kids, but not children with autism, a Stanford University team reports. The finding could explain why many children with autism seem indifferent to spoken words.

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Monkey See
5:26 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

Teens Find The Right Tools For Their Social-Media Jobs

When you need to illustrate a story about proliferating social-media platforms, it's good to know that an enterprising stock photographer has probably thought about it already.
Anatoliy Babiy iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 5:45 pm

Once upon a time, it was MySpace. (Huh. Turns out you can still link to it.) Then Facebook happened. And Twitter. And beyond those two dominant social-media platforms, there are a host of other, newer options for staying in touch and letting the digital universe get a look at your life. And for certain kinds of sharing, some of those other options make more sense to tech-savvy teens than the Big Two do.

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Code Switch
5:12 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

How Do You Teach The Civil Rights Movement?

A protestor is carried away from a demonstration in Jacksonville 50 years ago.
Jim Bourdier AP

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 9:37 pm

Note: As part of NPR's series on the summer of 1963, reporter Cory Turner headed to Jackson, Miss. to take a look at how folks are teaching the Civil Rights movement to kids who weren't a part of it — and making the lessons stick.

Much has changed in the past 50 years, since the height of the Civil Rights movement. But how do you teach the Civil Rights to kids who haven't ever experienced it? In Jackson, Miss., Fannie Lou Hamer Institute's Summer Youth Workshop tackles that question.

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Europe
4:26 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

Northern Ireland A Poignant Location For G-8 Summit

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 5:45 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

In his speech in Belfast, President Obama talked at length about the transformation of that city from conflict zone to a city bustling with normal healthy daily life. He got the biggest burst of applause when he tossed in a bit of Irish vernacular.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Students lounge at cafes asking each other, what's the crack?

BLOCK: What's the crack? Translation, how you doin'? Are you having fun?

OBAMA: So to paraphrase Seamus Hayden(ph), it's the manifestation of sheer bloody genius. This island is now chic.

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Middle East
4:26 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

Anti-Government Protests In Turkey Reach Syrian Border

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 5:45 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

In Turkey, anti-government protests are concentrated in Istanbul and Ankara, but they have spread to many cities around the country, reaching all the way to the Syrian border.

NPR's Peter Kenyon recently visited Hatay Province and found mounting discontent and growing fear of sectarian violence.

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Middle East
4:26 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

New Iranian President Known As The 'Diplomat Sheikh'

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 5:45 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Today, the new president of Iran vowed to follow the path of moderation and justice, not extremism. Hasan Rowhani talked of enhancing mutual trust between Iran and other countries. That marks a stark change in rhetoric from that of outgoing President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Rowhani campaigned as a reformist. He's also a cleric and Iran's former chief nuclear negotiator, who became known as the Diplomat Sheikh.

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Sports
4:26 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

San Antonio Spurs One Game From Winning Fifth NBA Title

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 5:45 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The pendulum of this year's NBA finals has swung again. The first win in the series went to the San Antonio Spurs, the next to the Miami heat, then Spurs, then Heat. And last night, the Spurs won game five. That puts them one game away from winning their fifth NBA title, all with Gregg Popovich as their coach and all with Tim Duncan as one of their key players. But the series reverts to Miami tomorrow night. NPR's Mike Pesca will be there, and he joins us now. Hi, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hello.

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The Salt
1:27 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

Italian University Spreads The 'Gelato Gospel'

Thousands of students from around the world flock to courses near Bologna, in central Italy, at the headquarters of Carpigiani, the leading global manufacturer of gelato-making machines.
Giuseppe Cacace AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 4:12 pm

Italy has secured its place in the global diet with the likes of espresso, cappuccino, pasta and pizza.

The latest addition to the culinary lexicon is ... gelato, the Italian version of ice cream.

And despite tough economic times, gelato-making is a booming business.

At Anzola dell'Emilia, a short drive from the Italian city of Bologna, people from all over the world are lining up for courses in gelato-making.

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National Security
5:40 pm
Sun June 16, 2013

Privacy Past And Present: A Saga Of American Ambivalence

Protesters gather outside the U.S. Capitol on Thursday to rally against the National Security Agency's recently detailed surveillance programs.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 6:17 pm

America's privacy concerns go back to the origins of the country itself.

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Author Interviews
4:27 pm
Sun June 16, 2013

A Posthumous Tribute To Guns From A Sniper Shot To Death

Firearms designer John Browning submitted this design for the M1911 pistol to the U.S. Patent Office in September 1910.
Courtesy William Morrow

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 6:17 pm

A killing on a Texas gun range in February captured the headlines. The victim was Chris Kyle, considered by many to be the most deadly sniper in American military history.

The man who admitted to killing him was a veteran as well — a young, disturbed man who had been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder.

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Music Interviews
3:58 pm
Sun June 16, 2013

'Glee' Guy Matthew Morrison On His First Love: Broadway

Matthew Morrison's musical life didn't start on TV; the Glee star is a Tony-nominated stage actor. Where It All Began is his second album of show tunes and standards.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 6:22 pm

Long before became known as Will Schuester — the lovable Spanish teacher and show choir director on TV's Glee — Matthew Morrison was dancing and singing, garnering Tony nods for his work on the Broadway stage.

Through it all, there was one song he always kept at the ready: "On the Street Where You Live" from My Fair Lady.

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Author Interviews
3:54 pm
Sun June 16, 2013

Dr. Brazelton On Guiding Parents And Learning To Listen

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 6:17 pm

For the better part of the past century, Dr. T. Berry Brazelton has studied babies, helping change the way we think about and care for them — right from the time they take their first breaths.

The renowned pediatrician hosted the long-running TV show What Every Baby Knows, and has written more than 30 books about child development. Hospitals worldwide rely on his newborn assessment known as the Brazelton scale.

At age 95, he's still going strong.

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Around the Nation
6:25 pm
Sat June 15, 2013

Water Wars: Who Controls The Flow?

Cattle stand in a heavily irrigated pasture in Oregon's Upper Klamath Basin. The state has ordered ranchers in the region to shut down irrigation. The move is aimed at protecting the rights of Indian tribes who live downstream.
Amelia Templeton for NPR

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 7:39 pm

So often, we take water for granted. We turn on the faucet and there it is. We assume it's our right in America to have water. And yet, water is a resource. It's not always where we need it, or there when we need it.

Rivers don't follow political boundaries — they flow through states and over international borders. And there are endless demands for water: for agriculture, drinking, plumbing, manufacturing, to name just a few. And then there's the ecosystem that depends on water getting downstream.

So what are our legal rights when it comes to water? And who decides?

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World
5:14 pm
Sat June 15, 2013

In Istanbul's Taksim Square, Cue The Piano Man

Amid the protests and clashes in Istanbul's Taksim Square, a pianist has been hauling in his instrument at night to entertain the crowds. Each time he does, the raucous crowd stills itself while he plays. In between tunes, chants rise up and he stands on his piano bench to conduct the crowd.

Middle East
5:03 pm
Sat June 15, 2013

Obama's Dilemma: Arming The Syrian Rebels

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 6:19 pm

The White House is taking its first tentative steps toward arming Syrian rebels. Host Jacki Lyden speaks with James Fallows, national correspondent with The Atlantic, about the U.S.' ongoing struggle to determine when is the right time to intercede. They also discuss moderate candidate Hasan Rowhani's victory in the Iranian presidential election.

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