All Things Considered on The News And Ideas Network

Weekdays, 4pm - 7pm; Weekends, 5pm - 6pm
Hosted By: Melissa Block, Michele Norris, Robert Siegel

For two hours every weekday, All Things Considered hosts Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block present this NPR program's trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews and offbeat features.

Local Host(s): 
George Olsen golsen@publicradioeast.org
Composer ID: 
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Europe
6:37 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Relying On Old Artisan Ways, French Brand Makes Itself Anew

Moynat was renowned for products such as the lightweight wicker trunk named Malle Anglaise, or English trunk, which was invented in 1873. This trunk was subsequently improved and a new patent filed in 1889.
Courtesy of Moynat

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 6:58 pm

Founded in the mid-19th century, French luxury leather goods maker Moynat became renowned for making traveling trunks for the moneyed set. Though a pioneer in its field, it fell on hard times and closed its doors in the 1970s.

These days, the fabled company is undergoing a resurrection — turning out limited quantities of luxurious, handmade bags that rely on centuries-old craftsmanship.

On a recent day, Moynat's CEO, Guillaume Davin, leads me up the back stairs of the company's flagship boutique in Paris.

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Code Switch
6:37 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Reporter's Notebook: Hopi Sacred Objects Returned Home

A Katsina depicted in a mural at the Museum of Northern Arizona.
Laurel Morales KNAU

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 2:39 pm

I cover Indian Country as a reporter for NPR member station KJZZ from a base in Flagstaff, which is on the edge of the country's largest reservation. So, I've educated myself about Navajo and Hopi cultural practices. This story, though, really tested me as a reporter and as a member of my community.

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NPR Story
5:13 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Some Investors Choosing U.S. Over Emerging Markets

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 6:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

For a long time, investors aiming for city profits have maintained that the smart money was on emerging markets. Economic growth in Brazil, Russia, India and China, the BRIC countries as they're known, has outstripped opportunities in the U.S. But in recent months, there is evidence that trend is starting to change. NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports investors are turning back to markets in the U.S. and other developed economies.

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NPR Story
5:13 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

3 Years Later, There's Still Work Left To Be Done On Dodd-Frank

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 6:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

Today, President Obama called all of the country's top financial regulators to the White House to get a progress report on implementation of the Dodd-Frank Act. That's the set of reforms that were passed following the financial crisis. With the fifth anniversary of the financial meltdown nearing, the president wants to communicate a sense of urgency about following through on the reforms.

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NPR Story
5:13 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

U.K. Detains Partner Of Journalist Who Talked With Snowden

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 6:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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All Tech Considered
2:46 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

The End Of Buttons: The New Gesture-Control Era

BlackBerry smartphones on a table during a "BlackBerry Brunch" in June in Berlin.
Timur Emek Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 6:58 pm

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The Two-Way
12:22 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

NPR CEO Gary Knell Announces He's Leaving

NPR CEO and President Gary Knell.
Sesame Workshop

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 6:58 pm

After fewer than 21 months on the job, NPR CEO Gary Knell announced at mid-day Monday that he's leaving the organization to become president and CEO at the National Geographic Society.

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Around the Nation
5:23 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

Cars In America: Is The Love Story Over?

Classic cars of all makes and models drive the 16-mile stretch along Woodward Avenue during the annual Dream Cruise in 2009 in Ferndale, Mich. During the annual event, the glory days of car culture return, if only for a day.
Jerry S. Mendoza AP

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 5:29 pm

Almost as soon as they started rolling off the assembly lines, automobiles became synonymous with freedom. And in the post-World War II boom our relationship with cars intensified.

It was about horsepower, status, being American, and for young people: rebellion. For generations cars inspired countless songs, books and movies. But now there are signs that our car culture is losing some of its shine.

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Author Interviews
5:23 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

A Dystopian View Of America's 'Fallen' Suburbs

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 6:03 pm

The suburbs can be a creepy place. And they are at their creepiest in Patrick Flanery's new novel, Fallen Land. Set outside an unnamed American city, this dark and complex thriller plays out in a half-built subdivision where construction ground to a halt during the housing crisis.

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Music
5:23 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

A Year After Its Debut, The Song 'Cups' Becomes A Hit

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF CUPS GAME)

DON GONYEA, HOST:

Does that sound familiar? You may recognize "Cups" as a rhythmic game from your childhood or from the song "Cups" which is on Billboard's hot 100 as the number six song in the country right now.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CUPS")

ANNA KENDRICK: (Singing) When I'm gone. When I'm gone. You're gonna miss me when I'm gone.

GONYEA: That's Anna Kendrick in a version of the song from the movie "Pitch Perfect," which came out last year. Since then, it's blown up. Why is it so popular all of a sudden?

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Books News & Features
2:22 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

Fans Are Like Friends To 'Reigning Queen' Of Women's Fiction

Debbie Macomber's latest book is Rose Harbor in Bloom.
Deborah Feingold

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 6:12 pm

Go to your nearest paperback rack, and odds are, you'll see two or three, or four, or — well, a lot of books by Debbie Macomber, an author The Sacramento Bee has dubbed "the reigning queen of women's fiction."

Macomber has 170 million books in print; the newest, Rose Harbor in Bloom, has just been released. Her publisher, Random House, celebrated Macomber's selling power earlier this month with a fan retreat at the Gaylord Opryland resort in Nashville, where 400 women gathered for a weekend of tea, knitting and literary friendship.

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Author Interviews
5:57 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

What Drove Wild West's Jesse James To Become An Outlaw?

Jesse James, seen here in his 1874 wedding portrait, fought in the American Civil War before he formed a gang and started robbing banks.
AP

Tales of Jesse James's exploits have grown to almost mythological proportions since the actual man and his gang galloped over the plains stealing horses, holding up trains, and robbing banks in the years after the Civil War. Shot All To Hell: Jesse James, The Northfield Raid, and the Wild West's Greatest Escape is a new book about the legendary man.

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Music Interviews
5:13 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Irene Diaz: Crafting Songs In Dreamy Black And White

Irene Diaz's debut EP is titled I Love You Madly.
Miguel Morales Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 9:50 pm

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All Tech Considered
4:48 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Cracking The Code: Just How Does Encrypted Email Work?

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 5:47 pm

If the past few months have taught us anything, it's that everything we do online leaves a digital trail. While it may seem like there's not much we can do about it, there are some tech companies that are working to obscure that trail a little bit, with a process known as encryption.

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It's All Politics
4:47 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Amid Struggle For 'Soul' Of GOP, Libertarians Take Limelight

Rep. Justin Amash of Michigan, a libertarian Republican, says recent surveillance leaks have "brought home" libertarian ideas.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 8:16 am

"There is no question that there is a civil war that is waging within the party."

That Republican conflict, political science professor David Cohen adds, isn't between just two sides, but among a number of factions, including libertarians.

One of the most public battles has involved national security and civil liberties. Leaks about the National Security Agency's surveillance programs raised alarms for libertarians about the government's reach.

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All Tech Considered
4:12 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Out Of The Comics, Into Reality: Jet Pack Moves Closer To Market

Standing on the center console of the Martin Jetpack, a pilot straps in and uses the joysticks to control flight.
Lee Howell Martin Aircraft Co.

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 6:45 pm

From Buck Rogers to James Bond, we all have a pretty concrete mental image of a jet pack — a motorized backpack with little handles in front and smoke shooting out of the back.

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Music Interviews
12:03 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Vince Gill And Paul Franklin Break Down The Bakersfield Sound

Vince Gill and Paul Franklin, two country legends, pay tribute to Merle Haggard and Buck Owens on a new album.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 5:23 pm

Vince Gill has been making records since he was a teenager. Paul Franklin plays pedal-steel guitar like few others have. The two country legends have a new album together titled Bakersfield.

It's a tribute to a particular kind of country music that came out of Bakersfield, Calif., and was created and championed by a couple of guys from that town named Buck Owens and Merle Haggard. Gill says the Bakersfield sound grew out of musicians moving west in the hope of scratching out a living.

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All Tech Considered
6:22 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Switching To Gmail May Leave Reporters' Sources At Risk

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:32 pm

In the digital world, almost everything you do to communicate leaves a trace. Often, emails are stored on servers even after they're deleted. Phone calls create logs detailing which numbers connected, when and for how long. Your mobile phone can create a record of where you are.

If you're a journalist trying to protect a confidential source, this is a very difficult world to work in.

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Research News
6:22 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

N. America's Oldest Known Petroglyphs Discovered In Nevada

Courtesy of Larry Benson

Ancient North Americans gouged elaborate rock art into a heap of big boulders northeast of Reno, Nev., more than 10,000 years ago and perhaps 15,000 years ago. That makes the carvings the oldest known petroglyphs on the continent, according to a paper published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.

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Politics
5:36 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

In Rural N.C., New Voter ID Law Awakens Some Old Fears

Opponents of North Carolina's new voter ID legislation wear tape over their mouths while sitting in the gallery of the House chamber of the North Carolina General Assembly in Raleigh, N.C., on April 24, where lawmakers debated new voter laws. On Monday, Gov. Pat McCrory signed a new law that requires a state-approved photo ID to vote and cuts early-voting opportunities.
Gerry Broome AP

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 8:51 pm

This week, North Carolina's governor signed a new law requiring a state-approved photo ID to cast a vote in a polling place and shortening the period for early voting. The move comes just weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court invalidated a key provision of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which had required large parts of the state to get federal approval before changing voting laws.

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