Down East Journal

Fridays, Noon - 12:30pm on both networks; Saturday at noon on The News and Ideas Network
  • Hosted by Hosted By: Jared Brumbaugh
  • Local Host Jared Brumbaugh

The Down East Journal is PRE's weekly news magazine program. Each week the program
features a variety of news, information, and feature stories with a focus on Eastern North Carolina.

This week on the Down East Journal, we detail North Carolina House Bill 251 which would allow concealed carry permit holders to have guns on some college campuses. We get reaction from local schools and students.  Also, from Hurricane Matthew recovery to keeping beachgoers safe this summer, we talk about how state and local governments are depending on drones for emergency response.  And, we hear what's on the menu for Taste of Coastal Carolina in downtown New Bern next week. 

This week on the Down East Journal, we revisit the soon to be built Atlantic Coast Pipeline. The project is top priority for many state and federal lawmakers and a point of contention for environmentalists.  More on a 100+ mile walk along the pipeline's route through eastern North Carolina from Robeson County to the Virginia Border.  Also, some people in eastern North Carolina are choosing stem cell therapy as an alternative to surgery to alleviate chronic pain.  We weigh the risk and benefits of the minimally invasive and experimental procedure.

Minor League Baseball is back in eastern North Carolina as opening day for the new Down East Wood Ducks is less than two months away. This week on the Down East Journal, the historical impact of baseball from the City of Kinston and new hopes for success after a six season drought without a team to call its own. Also, proposed shrimp trawling limits move forward at the coast.  And, we talk about a statewide mammal survey already underway in eastern North Carolina. 

This week on the Down East Journal, we speak to Goldsboro based historians investigating an obscure but important aspect of the region’s history – former slaves who fought for freedom.  And, a preview of what’s in store for season 14 of the Carolina Chamber Music Festival in New Bern.  

It’s a Valentine’s edition of Down East Journal this week.  Did you know North Carolina is in the top ten best states for lovers?  Plus, it’s Singing Valentines with the Southern Gentlemen Barbershop Chorus.  And, we speak to North Carolina based Burke Uzzle about his 50+ year career as a photographer, including his latest work: "Perceptions and Recognitions" - photographs of local, African-American residents. 

Whales and other marine mammals are believed to be impacted by seismic testing.  But what about fish?  This week on the Down East Journal, we speak to a local researcher who recently published the first study ever documenting how fish behave before and during seismic testing.  Plus, individuals struggling with sickle cell disease may be on the cusp of a breakthrough after an international drug trail ended last year.  One of the most active test areas was eastern North Carolina.  And, what to expect at the Antique Show and Sale next weekend in New Bern. 

More than three months after Hurricane Matthew, residents in Lenoir County are still displaced from their homes.  This week on the Down East Journal, we go to Kinston where local nonprofits teamed up  to help flood victims.  And, we explain what could be causing an increase in the number of whale strandings along our coast.

This week on the Down East Journal, we speak with commercial fishermen and conservationist at odds over a petition that would change the way commercial shrimp trawling takes place along our coast. Plus, Pitt County Emergency Services is launching a pilot program meant to prevent ER visits and bolster health and wellness in one of its most underserved areas.  And, we speak with the Artistic Director for the American Music Festival about the next performance, which pays homage to cellist Pablo Casals. 

This week on the Down East Journal, NCDOT's 10-year transportation plan lists more than 1,400 infrastructure projects across the state. We focus on major highway improvements in eastern North Carolina and the impact they may have for the region's commuters and visitors.  Plus, a large scale sea grass study – the first of its kind - is underway at the coast.  And, the Craven Literacy Council is holding a tutor training workshop for people who want to help adults improve their literacy skills.

This week on the Down East Journal, local governments are preparing to craft their budgets for the next fiscal year.  We focus on Pitt County's capital improvement plans.  And, it's chamber music in Greenville as East Carolina University holds their winter workshop concerts.

Hundreds of millions of dollars have been set aside for recovery following Hurricane Matthew and subsequent flooding.  This week on the Down East Journal, we examine where that money will help eastern North Carolina.  Plus, what Christmas in the colonial capital of North Carolina was like in the 18th century.  And, the Tar River Swing Band performs a concert of Christmas music next week.

This week on the Down East Journal, we examine how cold temperatures affect sea turtles and manatees passing by the North Carolina coast as they head south for the winter.  Plus, hospitals in eastern North Carolina are still dealing with the impacts of a nationwide drug shortage while learning how to work around it.  And, the ninth annual Christmas Candlelight Tour takes place in Beaufort.

It’s been 75 years since the bombing of Pearl Harbor.  This week on the Down East Journal, we detail a program in Goldsboro detailing the surprise attack, and the effect it had on Wayne County residents who survived. And, a new study shows that North Carolina has some of the lowest prices for ecstasy in the United States which could make it a hot spot for the production and sale of the illicit drug. 

This week on the Down East Journal, we speak to Superintendent Pat Kenney about the future of Cape Lookout National Seashore.  He’s leaving eastern North Carolina next year for a job at Yellowstone National Park.  And, how to keep the conversations civil this holiday season if they steer toward politics.

The election is over but all results aren't final.  This week on the Down East Journal, officials are counting provisional ballots in the canvass.  We'll talk about how that process will work in Craven and Wilson counties.  Plus, the environmental impact of Hurricane Matthew on the Neuse River and the Pamlico Sound. And, it's conversation with local celebrity chef Vivian Howard.  Just in time for the holidays, she released her first cookbook, "Deep Run Roots: Stories and Recipes from My Corner of the South."

We examine the way our swing state ‘swung’ and local races that made headline news in eastern North Carolina.  Plus, the rescheduled Mum Fest finally gets its turn this weekend, we hear what’s scheduled during this annual New Bern event.  And, we detail a new pilot program started by two medical students in Greenville that seeks to help military veterans transition back to civilian life.

It’s estimated there’s hundreds of millions of dollars in damages to agriculture and livestock in North Carolina due to Hurricane Matthew. We speak to the director of the State Farm Agency Bob Etheridge who was in eastern North Carolina recently to survey the damage firsthand. Plus, we visit areas hit hard by Hurricane Matthew to explore what affect the flooding had on early voting turnout. And, elder abuse affects 1 in 10 seniors.  We detail a new screening tool that helps improve identification of elder abuse.

Hurricane Matthew recovery continues throughout eastern North Carolina including Duplin County hit hard during the storm.  Plus, flooding, downed trees and washouts were reported across eastern North Carolina prompting dozens of road closures in our area. We speak with DOT Secretary Nick Tennyson about repair efforts underway.  And how to incorporate creepy-crawly plants into your landscape during the Garden Journal.

Some residents in ENC have started to clean up from flooding while others are still displaced.  We have updates from Kinston, Greenville and Vanceboro.  Plus, 27 counties in eastern North Carolina are eligible for disaster assistance.  We talk to a FEMA representative about how to apply.

Now that Hurricane Matthew has come and gone, some in eastern North Carolina are dealing with catastrophic flooding.  This week on the Down East Journal, we speak with Beaufort County residents saving personal items from rising floodwaters and visit an emergency shelter in Greenville.

Eighteen people lost their lives on North Carolina highways riding bicycles last year.  This week on the Down East Journal, we talk about new laws that took affect October 1st that aim to curb the number of crashes.  Plus, addiction to opioids like heroine is a nationwide epidemic hitting eastern North Carolina hard.  The latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control have four eastern counties with drug overdose rates above the state average.  A recent study from a major, healthcare provider put multiple eastern cities in the top 25 nationwide for the rate of opioid abusers.

This week on the Down East Journal, we travel to hard-hit Bertie County where residents and business owners are sifting through their belongings ruined by floodwaters.  We speak with people who are now homeless, and relief workers on the ground assisting residents on the lengthy road to recovery.   Plus, we speak with an organizer of a business symposium in Greenville next week.  And, details on an upcoming performance by the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing Band aboard Cherry Point.

You might be surprised to learn that North Carolina is home to 62 artificial reefs.

  As Election Day approaches, political rhetoric is getting louder. This can make for strained and tense conversations - especially in the workplace and family gatherings.  This week on the Down East Journal, how to cope with politically charged relationships.   And, we speak to State Transportation Secretary Nick Tennyson about how Greenville will benefit if a section of U.S. 264 becomes an interstate.   

North Carolina workers are among the least unionized in the country and many blame, or credit, the state's culture and "Right-to-Work" laws.  That's especially true in eastern North Carolina's primarily agricultural and service based economy. This week on the Down East Journal, we speak to local labor leaders and labor law experts on where workers stand in the region and the role they may play in a new labor movement. Plus, we explore how prepared local healthcare providers are when it comes to the uncertainty of Zika infection and microcephaly in infants.

This week on the Down East Journal, the Washington Development Tourism Authority calls for artists to submit paintings of waterfowl for the 2017-2018 North Carolina Duck Stamp Competition. Plus, the skies will be clear as Tropical Storm Hermine moves out of the region.  Hear how you can track planetary movement on “Carolina Skies.”  And, music and conversation with Asheville’s “The Broadcast.”

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Red Wolf Recovery Program is responsible for the reintroduction of the species declared biologically extinct in the 1980s.  Now, after decades of work, they may dismantle the program all together. This week on the Down East Journal, we speak with local conservation groups who recently held rallies to show their support and we hear from private landowners in the red wolf recovery area that want to see the program end.

As students return to East Carolina University in Greenville, many people are surprised to learn that there’s an increase in demand for counselors to address student anxiety.  Chris Thomas visits ECU to shed some light on the trend.  Plus, we stop by Safe Harbor Farm in Maysville, a non-profit whose mission has shifted over the past year.  And, as communities in our area strive to become more bicycle and pedestrian friendly, we talk about a statewide grant initiative helping local towns and cities build bike paths and sidewalks.

This week on the Down East Journal,the science of living shorelines and their ecological benefits.  Efforts are underway to construct more than 2,000 linear feet of living shoreline in eastern North Carolina’s sounds, bays, rivers, and waterways.  And, craft breweries are a burgeoning business in North Carolina. We meet a couple who make it a point to visit each one… and they’re having a hard time keeping up. This week, it’s a guide to North Carolina Craft Beer & Breweries.

This week on the Down East Journal, the City of Jacksonville with the help of coastal scientists are maintaining the health of Wilson Bay using green infrastructure.  Plus, North Carolina voters are once again in limbo after a federal court struck down the 2013 Voter ID law.  We talk to local officials about their precincts, how they've dealt with three tumultuous and erratic years and about what the future may hold.  And, snakes are out and about this summer. Tips on how to stay safe in the woods, on the trail or in your own backyard. 

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