Montford Point Memories

Credit Montford Point Marine Association

PRE honors the legacy of the Montford Point Marines in a series called Montford Point Memories.  We’ll hear from the brave men who were among the first African-Americans to serve in the Marine Corp. Public Radio East will donate the unedited interviews to be archived at the Military Collections at the State Library of North Carolina in the coming months. Montford Point Memories is made possible by PRE members.

Our Montford Point Memories series, honoring the legacy of the first African-Americans in the Marine Corps, continues with recollections from 92 year old Vaughn H. Whitworth.  Mr. Whitworth grew up in Kings Mountain, North Carolina.  He was drafted into the Marine Corps in November 1943 and sent to Camp Montford Point for basic training when he was 17 years old. The complete interview with Mr. Whitworth will soon be archived in the Military Collections at the State Archive of North Carolina in Raleigh. 

Our “Montford Point Memories” series continues this week with recollections from 92-year-old Robert S. Hammond.  After enlisting in the Navy in 1943, Mr. Hammond was sent to Hospital Corps School and the U.S. Naval Hospital in Brooklyn, New York.  After completing his training, Hammond became one of the first African American Navy Corpsman sent to Camp Montford Point. The complete interview with Mr. Hammond will soon be archived in the Military Collections at the State Archive of North Carolina in Raleigh.

Our “Montford Point Memories” series, honoring the legacy of the first African-Americans in the Marine Corps, continues with recollections from 89-year-old Johnny B. Cody.  He was 19 years old and living in Georgia when he enlisted in the Marine Corps.  Mr. Cody was sent to segregated facility Camp Montford Point for basic training in January, 1948.  The complete interview with Mr. Johnny B. Cody will soon be archived in the Military Collections at the State Archives of North Carolina in Raleigh.

Our Montford Point Marines series, honoring the legacy of the first African-Americans in the Marine Corps, continues with recollections from 88-year-old Allen Williams. Mr. Williams left Connecticut to enlist in the Marine Corp in 1948.   He was 18-years-old when he arrived at Camp Montford Point for basic training.  The complete interview with Mr. Williams will soon be archived in the Military Collections at the State Archives of North Carolina.

We continue our PRE series, “Montford Point Memories,” honoring the legacy of the first African American Marines who were trained at Camp Montford Point in Jacksonville.  Today, we hear from 93-year-old John R. Thompson who grew up in Kannapolis, North Carolina.  He enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1943 following the attack on Pearl Harbor.  The entire interview with Mr. Thompson will soon be archived in the Military Collections at the State Archives of North Carolina in Raleigh.

G. Taylor/National Montford Point Marine Association

Our "Montford Point Memories" series, honoring the legacy of the first African-Americans in the Marine Corps, continues with recollections from 93-year-old Edwin Fizer Jr. 

PRE honors the legacy of the Montford Point Marines in a new series called Montford Point Memories.  We’ll hear from the brave men who were among the first African-Americans to serve in the Marine Corp. 

G. Taylor/National Montford Point Marine Association

Last month, the National Montford Point Marine Association held their annual convention in Jacksonville with special events to honor the first African Americans in the Marine Corp.