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NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on Public Radio East.

Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep and NPR's Renee Montagne. Kelly Batchelor is the PRE host coordinating regional news, weather, and features of interest to our Eastern North Carolina audiences.

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Around the Nation
7:00 am
Thu November 21, 2013

Small Town In Utah Forgets To Hold An Election

Mayor Jay Hortin of Wallsburg, population 275, will stay in office for two more years because the town's new recorder forgot to hold an election. It's the second time in a row this has happened.

Around the Nation
6:55 am
Thu November 21, 2013

Ad Backing Boeing In 'Seattle Times' Uses Airbus Photo

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Boosters of Washington state decided to advertise. They want work on Boeing's new 777-airplane to stay in the state. Boeing is demanding tax breaks and union concessions. To build political support, the state boosters took out an ad in the Seattle Times, but maybe it's a subliminal jab at Boeing. The ad headlined "The Future of Washington," has a picture of an airplane that's not by Boeing. It's built by Boeing's rival, Airbus.

Politics
5:38 am
Thu November 21, 2013

Mexican-American Vets Ignited Kennedy's Latino Support

President John F. Kennedy speaks to Mexican-American activists at a LULAC gala in Houston's Rice Hotel on Nov. 21, 1963, the day before he was assassinated.
Alexander Arroyos AP

Originally published on Thu November 21, 2013 9:12 am

On the evening of Nov. 21, 1963, President John F. Kennedy, his wife Jacqueline, Vice President Lyndon Johnson and his wife, Lady Bird, walked through a wall of applause to take their place as honored guests in a Houston ballroom. They were making a brief stop at a formal dinner held by LULAC — the League of United Latin American Citizens — to show their appreciation for the Mexican-American votes that had helped the young president carry Texas in the 1960 election.

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Health Care
5:04 am
Thu November 21, 2013

Medicare Project May Provide Better Care Less Expensively

Originally published on Thu November 21, 2013 6:55 am

Fort Dodge, Iowa, is not exactly what you'd think of as a hotbed of health care innovation. But the small town in the western part of the state is part of a Medicare pilot project that economists say could be a pathway to the holy grail of health care: providing better care at a lower cost.

Remembrances
5:04 am
Thu November 21, 2013

Winner Of 2 Nobel Prizes, Fred Sanger Dies At 95

Originally published on Thu November 21, 2013 6:55 am

Nobel Prize winning biochemist Fred Sanger has died. He was 95. Sanger, who won two Nobel Prizes, pioneered research into the human genome. Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne have this remembrance.

Music Interviews
3:26 am
Thu November 21, 2013

The Orchestral Recipe, From The Pilgrims To Today

Food and music mingle in Pieter Claesz's Still Life with Musical Instruments (1623).
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Thu November 21, 2013 6:55 am

If you're going to be cooking Thanksgiving dinner next week, you've probably already started gathering the traditional ingredients — but your ingredients are most likely very different from those that made up the first Thanksgiving meal in 1621. (Marshmallows with those sweet potatoes, anyone?)

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Education
3:25 am
Thu November 21, 2013

Kids Pay The Price In Fight Over Fixing Philadelphia Schools

Third-grader Kassim West last July at Walter G. Smith Elementary School, one of more than 20 Philadelphia public schools that closed at the end of the school year.
Matt Stanley for NPR

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 8:58 am

This is the first in a three-part report on Philadelphia schools in crisis.

Sharron Snyder and Othella Stanback, both seniors at Philadelphia's Benjamin Franklin High, will be the first in their families to graduate from high school. This, their final year, was supposed to be memorable. Instead, these teenagers say they feel cheated.

"We're fed up with the budget cuts and everything. Like, this year, my school is like really overcrowded. We don't even have lockers because it's, like, too many students," Sharron says.

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The Picture Show
3:24 am
Thu November 21, 2013

Around The World In ... A Lot Of Steps

Paul Salopek and his guide walk into the desert, on day 19 of the "Out of Eden walk" in the Afar region of Northeast Ethiopia. The walk with take about 7 years total.
Paul Salopek National Geographic

Originally published on Thu November 21, 2013 11:51 am

Paul Salopek has discovered that the best way to take in information, to be a journalist and a storyteller, is not flying around the world with the latest technology. It's by walking.

"There's something about moving across the surface of the earth at 3 miles per hour that feels really good," he tells NPR's Steve Inskeep.

Salopek plans to walk 21,000 miles total — from Africa to the Middle East, across Asia, down through Alaska and all the way to Tierra del Fuego. He calls it the "Out of Eden Walk" because the idea is to follow the path of human migration.

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Pop Culture
7:34 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Monty Python To Reunite For Stage Show

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The rumors are true. Terry Jones confirmed to the BBC that Monty Python will reunite for a stage show. It's been more than three decades since the last proper Python project. The group is beloved on both sides of the Atlantic for its surreal sense of humor, with a touch of slapstick.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL")

GRAHAM CHAPMAN: (as King Arthur) Now, stand aside, worthy adversary.

JOHN CLEESE: (as the Black Knight) 'Tis but a scratch.

Animals
7:34 am
Wed November 20, 2013

National Zoo Creates 'Name The Panda' Contest

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep. We've brought our staff into the studio to respond to this sappy story about the baby panda at the National Zoo. The zoo in Washington is holding an online contest to name the panda. The name will be bestowed December 1st when the cub is 100 days old. Meanwhile, we can report the kid went for a walk. Colleagues were told she crawled out of the den all by herself, though she then got tired and went to sleep in the doorway.

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP: Aw.

Around the Nation
4:44 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Early Warnings Saved Lives In Weekend Storms

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 7:34 am

The death toll from Sunday's tornado outbreak across the Midwest stands at eight. Many of those who witnessed the devastation say they're shocked that number isn't higher. Early warnings delivered by text message may have helped limit the casualties.

Politics
4:44 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Obama Concedes Botched Insurance Website Rollout Cost Time

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 7:34 am

The Obama administration is asking for people who've been turned off by the government's problem-plagued insurance website to come back. Officials say the website is working better now, though it's still far from fixed.

Business
4:44 am
Wed November 20, 2013

DOJ Signals JPMorgan Deal Could Be Model For Other Cases

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 7:34 am

The Justice Department on Tuesday announced a landmark $13 billion settlement with JPMorgan Chase. That's the largest settlement the federal government has ever made with a single company. It's three times the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill settlement.

Author Interviews
4:44 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Gov. Scott Walker Recounts First-Term Battles In New Book

Gov. Scott Walker speaks during a rally for South Carolina Republican Gov. Nikki Haley on Aug. 26 in Greenville, S.C.
Richard Shiro AP

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 4:54 pm

In his new book released this week, Unintimidated: A Governor's Story and a Nation's Challenge, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker reflects on the political firestorm he survived at home in 2012 — and diagnoses what went wrong for the national party.

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Around the Nation
3:18 am
Wed November 20, 2013

The Art Of Letter-Writing Isn't Lost On These Scribblers

Do you write letters anymore? A few determined people are doing their best to keep them arriving in U.S. mailboxes.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 11:00 am

When was the last time you wrote a letter?

If the answer is "not recently," then you can count yourself among the millions of Americans who just don't write letters anymore. The post office says the average American home receives only one personal letter about every two months.

But there are a few determined people who are doing their best to wreck that average.

"It's becoming a lost art," says Deb Bruzewski.

Every day she curls up on her plaid couch in her home in Auburn, Mich., to write a few of her 60 letters for the week.

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Africa
3:16 am
Wed November 20, 2013

In Nigeria's Bloody Fight, Who's Gaining The Upper Hand?

Men walk amid rubble after Boko Haram militants raided the town of Benisheik in northeast Nigeria, on Sept. 19. The Islamist group has been waging an insurgency in northern and central Nigeria for the past four years and was recently placed on the U.S. list of terrorist groups.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 10:51 am

For four years, the Islamist militants of Boko Haram have been waging a deadly campaign in northern and central Nigeria, killing thousands of people. In response, the Nigerian military is cracking down on the group, and the United States last week designated Boko Haram a terrorist organization.

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Sweetness And Light
3:00 am
Wed November 20, 2013

In Basketball, It's Always About What's Next

This year, there are three college players being called "the next LeBron James." Meanwhile, many are speculating about where the first LeBron James, now playing for the Miami Heat, will be next season.
Lynne Sladky AP

Originally published on Thu December 12, 2013 12:51 pm

College basketball seems to get started sooner every year, like puberty in American children. Why does everything have to begin so early now, before you have time to get ready for it?

Things move so fast in college basketball that there are three players this year who are being called "the next LeBron James. " In the NBA, most of the talk is already about where the superstars will be next season.

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Around the Nation
7:12 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Word Of The Year: Selfie

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne announcing the word of the year: Selfie. The Smartphone self-portrait. The Oxford Dictionary says it perfectly captures 2013. Selfies lit up social media and dirty ones derailed political careers. Teens even took one with the Pope. The word's come a long way since popping up on an Australian message board a decade ago. It beat out binge watch, meaning marathon TV watching, and twerk. You can look that one up. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:05 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Brooklyn Writer Live-Tweets Couple's Breakup

Brooklyn writer Kyle Ayers says he was on his apartment rooftop when he witnessed a breakup. So he decided to tweet what the man and woman were saying.

Middle East
6:15 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Iranian Cultural Attache Killed In Beirut Blasts

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 9:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Two car bombs exploded in Beirut, Lebanon today. They exploded near the embassy of Iran in that city. The roughly two dozens dead include Iran's cultural attaché, we're told. The bombings draw attention for their violence, for their apparent target, Iran, and for the location. Lebanon is next door to Syria where Iran is deeply involved in a civil war supporting the government of President Bashar al Assad.

Let's go next to the New York Times Beirut bureau chief Anne Barnard. She's on the line from there. Hi, Anne.

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