Morning Edition on The News And Ideas Network

Weekdays, 5am - 9am
Hosted By: Kelly Batchelor

NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on Public Radio East.

Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep and NPR's Renee Montagne. Kelly Batchelor is the PRE host coordinating regional news, weather, and features of interest to our Eastern North Carolina audiences.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187c7e2e1c808de7e77b1d8|5187c7d8e1c808de7e77b1bf

Pages

Sports
6:40 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Why College Basketball So Celebrates The Semifinalists

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 12:33 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The NCAA men's basketball tournament resumes tomorrow. Louisville plays Wichita State and Syracuse faces Michigan. On the women's side, it's Louisville again. They're playing California. Notre Dame is playing Connecticut. These quartets of teams, of course, are known as the Final Four, and this stage in the tournament is a resume booster for teams and coaches. NPR's Mike Pesca ponders the question of why college basketball, unique among major team sports, celebrates the semi finalists.

Read more
Business
6:29 am
Fri April 5, 2013

The Ups And Downs Of Cyber Currency Bitcoin

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 7:30 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Bitcoin is a virtual currency that's traded largely online. It was created in 2009 in the aftermath of the global financial crisis as an alternative to currencies which are controlled by countries and central bankers. But Bitcoin has been on a wild ride lately, soaring in value during the anxious days of the Cyprus banking crisis.

We're going to look at the currency's history in today's Business Bottom Line. Here's NPR's Steve Henn.

Read more
Middle East
4:31 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Talks Over Iran's Nuclear Program Resume In Kazakhstan

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 7:30 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

We have been hearing a lot about North Korea and nuclear weapons lately. Well, nuclear negotiators have just wrapped up a first day of talks on Iran's nuclear program. Tehran does not have nuclear weapons and insists it doesn't want them, but six world powers say the country must do more to assure the world that its program is entirely peaceful. We spoke earlier with NPR's Peter Kenyon, who is in Almaty, Kazakhstan for the talks. Peter, good morning.

PETER KENYON, BYLINE: Good morning, David.

Read more
Business
4:31 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 7:30 am

The computer maker's chairman Ray Lane has stepped down as executive chairman. He's been on thin ice with shareholders after his role in acquiring a business software company ended up hurting HP's bottom line.

Law
4:09 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Without Reviews, Inmates Can Get Lost In U.S. Prison System

Stephen Slevin, who spent more than 22 months in solitary confinement despite not being convicted of a crime, is seen here in Dona Ana County Sheriff's Department photos, before and after his time in solitary.
AP

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 9:16 pm

Every year 10 million people funnel in and out of America's jails and prisons. And every year some of them get lost. Recently there have been two high-profile cases of such inmates — one who got out years too early, and one who stayed years too long. Both had disastrous consequences.

In January, Evan Ebel walked out of a Colorado prison four years too early. Two months later, he allegedly rang the doorbell of Tom Clements, the head of the Colorado Department of Corrections, shot him in the chest and killed him. Ebel was shot and killed by police two days later.

Read more
Arts & Life
3:19 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Jewishness On Display: 'Truth' By Way Of Discomfort

Bill Glucroft, an American Jew living in Berlin, chats with visitors from his box in the most controversial portion of the Berlin Jewish Museum's exhibition "The Whole Truth."
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 9:16 pm

In Berlin's Jewish Museum, a new exhibit called "The Whole Truth" asks visitors uncomfortable and even absurd questions about Jews. One of the curators, Michal Friedlander, says it is intentionally provocative.

"The point is to get people talking about how they perceive Jews, particularly in Germany today," she says.

But some German Jews accuse the museum of going too far.

Read more
Television
3:18 am
Fri April 5, 2013

As Audiences Shift To Cable, TV Programming Changes, Too

In recent years, high-profile cable TV dramas like AMC's Mad Men have helped to shift audiences and programming across all types of TV networks. (Pictured, from left: John Slattery, Jon Hamm and Vincent Kartheiser)
Michael Yarish / AMC

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 1:20 pm

Mad Men comes back for its sixth season Sunday at an opportune moment for basic cable. Last weekend, 25 million viewers combined watched The Bible and The Walking Dead on basic cable channels. That's more than triple the audience for The Good Wife on CBS that same night.

Read more
Media
3:17 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Is The Company Behind Rodman's Korea Visit The Future Of Media?

Vice founder Shane Smith attends the premiere screening for the MTV series The Vice Guide To Everything in New York City in December 2010. Vice's new documentary series on HBO launches Friday.
Jemal Countess Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 3:17 pm

How did Dennis Rodman end up having dinner with Kim Jong Un in North Korea? It was the idea of Vice Media, which has grown from a counterculture magazine into a full-fledged youth media conglomerate.

Friday night, it premieres a documentary series on HBO, a kind of coming-out moment into the mainstream.

'I Wish We Were Weirder'

Read more
StoryCorps
12:32 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Drafted To Fight For The Country That Hurt Him

Ruben Aguilar (right), 85, spoke with his friend Bill Luna, 77, about being deported to Mexico at age 6: "I grew up when that happened. From 6 years old, all of a sudden I felt like I was 15."
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 10:49 am

Ruben Aguilar, 85, was forcibly deported from the U.S. 80 years ago as part of a largely forgotten Mexican repatriation program run by the American government.

During the Great Depression, hundreds of thousands of people of Mexican descent were forcibly deported to Mexico without due process, including many American citizens. Aguilar, an American citizen, was born in Chicago but was deported with his parents, who were undocumented. At the time, he was 6 years old.

Read more
History
7:17 am
Thu April 4, 2013

Cat From Middle Ages Leaves Mark On History

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Here's an old saying: Feed and love a dog, and the dog thinks you must be God. Feed and love a cat, and the cat thinks, hey, I must be God. A cat from the Middle Ages apparently demanded attention. A researcher was recently studying a manuscript from 1445 in Croatia, and that researcher discovered paw prints. Apparently, a scribe was working in 1445 when the cat stepped in ink, and then stood with all four paws on the work in progress. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

World
7:10 am
Thu April 4, 2013

New Zealand Movie Goer Notices Lack Of Explosions

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 10:30 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

The action film "Jack Reacher" hit theaters in December, and it got some favorable reviews. But one New Zealand moviegoer didn't think it was action-packed enough. That's because the trailer featured an explosion that wasn't in the movie. Disappointed, the man complained to the Advertising Standards Authority. He said the explosion was one of the main reasons he went to see the flick in the first place. Paramount Pictures has now offered to refund the money for his ticket.

Middle East
5:19 am
Thu April 4, 2013

As Egypt Negotiates IMF Loan, Food And Fuel Prices Soar

An Egyptian woman carries a cooking gas canister in Cairo on Tuesday. The government just raised the price of gas as part of an energy package needed to satisfy the conditions of a $4.8 billion IMF loan. Opponents say some of the conditions disproportionately hurt the poor.
Khalil Hamra AP

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 2:30 pm

Two years after the revolution, Egypt is in a deep economic crisis. It's running out of money to purchase crucial imports like wheat and fuel, both of which are subsidized by the government, and an infusion of cash is desperately needed.

While a delegation from the International Monetary Fund is in Cairo continuing negotiations on a $4.8 billion loan, Egyptians are strained by the rising costs of food — and the gas needed to cook it.

For Mosaad el Dabe, it's a disaster.

Read more
Middle East
5:18 am
Thu April 4, 2013

Risks Increase For Humanitarian Aid Workers In Syria

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 6:29 am

David Greene talks to Muhannad Hadi, the World Food Program's regional emergency coordinator for Syria, about the growing humanitarian crisis in Syria. The civil war there has entered its third year, and last month was its deadliest.

Business
5:11 am
Thu April 4, 2013

For Right Price, You Could Own Buzz Aldrin's Toothbrush

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 7:00 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is space memorabilia.

Heritage Auction house is selling items that have gone to the moon. Astronaut Buzz Aldrin's toothbrush could be yours with the right offer.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK. The bidding for this toothbrush - I hope they disinfect it - it's a light blue, Lactona tooth tip brush. The bidding starting at $9,000. The auction house is actually hoping that buyers will offer more than that.

Read more
Around the Nation
8:19 am
Wed April 3, 2013

Cold Snap Delays Maryland Crabbing Season

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Punxsutawney Phil has his counterpart in the average Maryland crab - except while Phil supposedly predicts the weather and this year missed a cold snap, Maryland crabs react in real time. This week was supposed to be the start of crabbing season but the chill in the Chesapeake has left the water too cold for the crabs to come out of the mud. It turns out this is extending their life spans - since it means watermen can't catch them. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:23 am
Wed April 3, 2013

911 Dispatcher Asks Her Mom To Rescue Kayaker

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 8:19 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Raedyn Grasseth might get the award for most creative 911 operator. The Washington state woman dispatched an officer to rescue a stranded kayaker on the Colombia River. The boater was in powerful currents, hanging onto a pile of logs. Grasseth had a feeling she might not be reached in time. And so, she called an experienced kayaker who happened to live nearby, her mother. The dispatcher's mom paddled out and within minutes brought the woman to safety.

Around the Nation
6:26 am
Wed April 3, 2013

Restaurants Take Risks For Big Rewards At Phoenix Airport

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 8:19 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

If you travel a lot you're probably doing a lot of meals in airports, maybe fast-food by Gate C31 or the chain coffee place nearby. Well, one of the busiest airports in the country is now bringing in local restaurants.

As Peter O'Dowd reports from member station KJZZ in Phoenix, these small businesses are taking a risk for a shot at a big reward.

(SOUNDBITE OF MACHINERY)

Read more
Health Care
6:26 am
Wed April 3, 2013

White House Delays Part Of Health Care Law

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 8:19 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The Obama administration is delaying the start of a key piece of the Affordable Care Act - the national healthcare law. Workers in small businesses will have to wait an additional year to be able to choose from more than one plan in the new online marketplace that start next January. NPR's Julie Rovner reports that the change might dampen enthusiasm, at least at the start. But not everyone thinks that's a bad thing.

Read more
Remembrances
6:26 am
Wed April 3, 2013

Remembering Robert Remini

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 9:20 am

A former House historian, prolific biographer and professor emeritus at the University of Illinois, Chicago, Robert Remini spent a lifetime exploring handwritten letters and other documents that illuminate the 19th century. He won a National Book Award for the three-volume The Life of Andrew Jackson.

Politics
4:34 am
Wed April 3, 2013

Outrage Alone Won't Advance Gun Control Measures

President Obama urged Congress to take action on measures to protect children from gun violence while speaking in the East Room of the White House last week. Standing with Obama are Vice President Joe Biden and, according to the White House, law enforcement officials, victims of gun violence and others, whom the White House did not want to name.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 8:42 am

President Obama is trying to regain some traction for federal gun control measures by visiting states that are moving forward on their own.

On Wednesday, the president speaks in Colorado, where lawmakers recently passed a series of bills requiring background checks for all gun purchases and limiting the size of ammunition magazines.

Obama would like to see similar measures adopted nationwide. But if Colorado serves as an inspiration for the president, it also provides a cautionary tale.

Read more

Pages