Greenville

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Greenville is one of the largest cities in eastern North Carolina.  Its changing landscape is the focus of a new exhibit which opened June 5th and will run through August 27th.  Sarah Finch has more.

This week on the Down East Journal, we speak with the Chairman of Intersal, the company engaged in a legal battle over Blackbeard's flagship, The Queen Anne's Revenge.  And, an art exhibit in Greenville reimagines abandoned parts of the city.  Plus, we highlight a complex program aimed at understanding, predicting, and mitigating the impacts of hurricanes and tropical storms.

A hybrid sport called "footgolf" is growing in popularity since it was introduced in the U.S. four years ago.  It's even spreading into eastern North Carolina with certified courses in Greenville, Goldsboro, Rocky Mount and Wilmington.  Whether you'd like to show off your footgolf skills or try it out for the first time, the Humane Society of Eastern Carolina is holding a footgolf tournament in Greenville on Saturday May 30th.  Proceeds from the event will support the non-profit.

We explore how law enforcement officers in eastern North Carolina are using body cameras, from urban areas to rural towns.

Sigma Phi Epsilom Facebook

Fraternities are still on restriction at East Carolina University in Greenville, even though police have concluded that a rape reported late last month did not happen.  More on Greek life in the East and the new awareness effort aimed at fraternities and sororities at ECU.

Driving rural roads, alone at night, can leave motorists in a vulnerable position.  Add to that scenario, an unidentified man repeatedly following those travelers, asking them to stop to inspect nonexistent damage.   Three  such incidents have happened over the last few weeks in eastern North Carolina.  Now Mikel Peterson has more on the man’s tactics and some practical tips that could keep you safe.

http://www.greenvillecommunityshelter.org/

The aging  homeless shelter in Greenville is being replaced.  The new shelter will be located behind the existing facility and will be completed in summer 2015.

Pitt County is ranked number one as the most dangerous county in the state for vehicle accidents.  We pinpoint some reasons Greenville drivers are most at risk.  

Pitt County Arts Council

The Pitt County Arts Council at Emerge is seeking artists for their first ever Artist In Residence Program.  The deadline for applications is August 8th.  The winner will receive a nine month residency with free studio access and $2,000 instructor stipend.  Mac McKee speaks with Executive Director Holly Garriott about the program and the responsibilities of an Artist in Residence.

Cities and towns across Eastern North Carolina are beginning to view their rivers as a source of recreation and revenue, and Greenville is no exception. Today, Lee Jenkins tells us about the Tar River Legacy Plan.

After six months of searching, Pitt County has appointed a new Director of Social Services. Lee Jenkins reports.

As of Monday, Jan Elliot has replaced Interim Director Earl Marett as head of the Department. Elliot’s first goal as Director is to acquaint herself with the workings and workers of Pitt County’s DSS and to continue to tweak and fine tune some of the projects started by her predecessors.

“There were some issues with the computer system that the state had, with making sure that applications and reviews were done timely, the NC Fast system.”

A theater troupe Magnolia Arts Center is bringing “A Raisin in the Sun” to Eastern North Carolina. The play, set in the 1950’s focuses on an African American family living in Chicago that suddenly acquires a large sum of money, and purchases a home in a white neighborhood.  Lee Jenkins spoke with members of the cast and crew, and has this sneak peek of the production, which begins its run in Greenville next week.

Early development for a large-scale highway connector is making good progress, but is still years away from completion. Lee Jenkins has more.

The thirty-five million dollar 10th Street Connector Project is speeding through its acquisition phase. Development rights have been settled for two thirds of the 193 properties affected by the project, some of which are businesses and residences.

According to the Greenville Daily Reflector, workers have already begun demolishing vacant homes along Farmville Boulevard and other streets.

A vacant property in Greenville could become a new DNA processing facility.  Jared Brumbaugh has more.

The company wanting to purchase the facility has asked to remain anonymous.  The 68-hundred square foot building is located near Vidant Medical Center.  Existing Industries Coordinator with the Pitt County Development Commission Scott Poag says they’re seeking a $60,000 grant from the North Carolina Rural Economic Development Center to facilitate renovations.  He adds the grant amount is based upon how many jobs are created.

We talk to a local nonprofit on their efforts to open a shelter to help young boys victimized through sex trafficking.  The Greenville home would be the first of its kind in the country.