hunting

  The first ever alligator hunting season in North Carolina could start next summer.  This week on the Down East Journal, we talk to the Wildlife Resource Commission about their proposed hunting rules and the public comment period underway.  Plus, we speak with Camp Lejeune’s Lieutenant Colonel Lauren Edwards, the first women to lead an Engineering Battalion in the United States Marine Corp.  And, we speak with Jennifer Licko and her band about their upcoming "A Celtic Christmas" concerts in eastern North Carolina. 

NC Wildlife Resources Commission

To hunt or not to hunt, that is the question on wildlife officials minds moving forward with a plan to allow the first ever alligator hunting season in North Carolina.  The State Wildlife Resources Commission has proposed rules that call for a 30-day season.  Wildlife Diversity Coordinator Allen Boynton says they’re seeking public comment on the plan now through January 25th.

“We have had requests from a number of people interested in hunting alligators.  South Carolina recently started an alligator season and after that happened, the request we received increased.”

NC Wildlife Resources Commission

Over the past 30 years, black bear populations in North Carolina have increased fivefold.   We talk about new hunting policies in place to help stabilize their numbers.  

According to NC’s Wildlife Resources Commission, Eastern North Carolina’s black bear population has made a comeback. Today, the population sits at just over 10,000, compared to the paltry 2,000 three decades ago.

“The increase in the bear population has been occurring since the early 1980’s.”

Over the past 30 years, black bear populations in North Carolina have increased fivefold.   This week on the Down East Journal, we talk about new hunting policies in place to help stabilize their numbers.  And, the re-located 1886 Roanoke River Lighthouse reopens to the public this weekend in Edenton. More on its history and the renovation process.  Listen for the Down East Journal, Friday at noon on all of the PRE stations, and Saturday at noon on News and Ideas.

It’s estimated that there are less than 100 red wolves in existence, and they roam a five county area in northeastern North Carolina.  Now, these small pockets are endangered further.  This week on the Down East Journal, we explore the two most recent red wolf deaths in Washington County and the reward being offered for any information leading to an arrest. The Down East Journal airs Friday at noon on all of the PRE stations.  And Saturday at noon on News and Ideas.