Institute of Marine Sciences

E. Woodward/ UNC Institute of Marine Sciences.

Recent events have led to an interest in the 50 shark species that call our coast home.  This week on the Down East Journal, we speak with Assistant Professor at the Institute of Marine Sciences Dr. Joel Fodrie about how this apex predator is actually an integral part of the coastal ecosystem.  

Fortunately, dangerous interactions between humans and sharks are extremely rare.  The fact that three unprovoked shark attacks have happened along our coast within days of each other is also very unusual.   Now, many beachgoers are scared to enter the water.

Recent events have led to an interest in the 50 shark species that call our coast home.  This week on the Down East Journal, we speak with Assistant Professor at the Institute of Marine Sciences Dr. Joel Fodrie about how this apex predator is actually an integral part of the coastal ecosystem.  The Down East Journal airs Friday at noon on all of the PRE stations.  And Saturday at noon on News and Ideas.  

The population of large sharks have dropped significantly since the 1980s, posing a serious concern for fisheries and ecosystem management.  This week on the Down East Journal, we speak to Coastal Scientist Dr. Joel Fodrie about his award winning research and the impact the decline of large sharks is having off the coast of North Carolina.  

The population of large sharks have dropped significantly since the 1980s, posing a serious concern for fisheries and ecosystem management.  This week on the Down East Journal, we speak to Coastal Scientist Dr. Joel Fodrie about his award winning research and the impact the decline of large sharks is having off the coast of North Carolina.  And, the Twin River Quilters Guild is holding their BEE BY THE RIVER quilt show in New Bern next weekend.  Those stories and more Friday at noon on all of the PRE stations.  And Saturday at noon on News and Ideas. 

Living Shorelines

Apr 25, 2014
North Carolina Coastal Federation

Protecting shorelines with natural, vegetative barriers is not only better for the ecosystem, it’s a more effective means of slowing shoreline erosion.  We speak to a local researcher about her work with “living shorelines.”

Dr. Paerl, UNC Institute of Marine Sciences

The common blue green algae found on local waterways has bloomed into an unprecedented event in the Taihu basin.  We speak with North Carolina scientist Dr. Hans Paerl about his research trip to China and what we can do to prevent cyanobacteria from proliferating in eastern North Carolina.

This week, we talk about a new partnership between the Institute of Marine Sciences and local schools where coastal scientists become teachers for a day.

Last week, a group of third grade students in Beaufort were learning about coastal habitats, food web dynamics and the different kinds of marine life found along the North Carolina coast.  But the lesson wasn’t being taught by teachers. Instead, graduate students from the Institute of Marine Sciences in Morehead City offered a unique, hands-on lesson about our coastal ecology.  Tiller School third grader Jack McMann.

We talk to a local scientist who developed a new method of rapidly detecting polluted water that’s likely to become the standard in the United States. 

For information on current swimming advisories, chick [here].