Joan Carris commentary

INTRO – There is what we know. There is what we don’t know. Then there is the stuff we just can’t mentally erase. Prepare yourself… commentator Joan Carris runs down some science you just can’t forget.

As you know, every language has its own set of figures of speech, cliches, and colloquialisms—those quirky verbal bits that occur in all languages.  They are called tropes by the literati.  As a word, trope is muscling its way into popularity.  I expect it to replace all those other words in the way that venue has supplanted the words site and place.  Venue sounds classier, I suppose.

When I was a senior in college, I took a sociology course on marriage.  It was known as a gut course, dead easy.  You could even cut class, as I did that quarter in order to go bowling with a friend.  Yet the course was useful, particularly our discussions about the innumerable tremendous trifles that pop up in every marriage or close relationship.  You know…the person who leaves toothpaste in the sink…the one who always drops dirty clothes on the floor…the partner who never replaces a toilet paper roll.  (And these are just bathroom topics.)   What are we supposed to do with all of the be

This week on the Down East Journal, a Wilmington author explores a colonial era war in eastern North Carolina that allowed the state's western expansion.  Plus, new commentary from Joan Carris and the Garden Journal.  Listen for the Down East Journal airs Friday at noon on all of the PRE stations.  And Saturday at noon on News and Ideas.