World

The two American bicyclists killed in an attack in Tajikistan on Sunday were a couple from Washington, D.C., who quit their jobs to bike around the globe.

The couple, Jay Austin and Lauren Geoghegan, both 29, had been on the road for just over a year.

On their blog, they described the kindness and generosity of strangers around the world as they biked through Africa, Europe and central Asia.

For a brief moment last week, just off the coast of southwestern Canada, the typically grim outlook confronting orcas took on a hopeful hue. A whale watch operator, staring through binoculars, had caught sight of a healthy calf swimming beside its mother — a rare beacon for a population that had not seen a healthy infant in years.

It was not to last, however. By the time experts with the Center for Whale Research arrived, just half an hour later, the calf had already died.

But that's not the end of this story.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Ruben de Kock has been training South Africa's park rangers for over two decades — but last month was the first time one of his former students was killed on the job.

The July 19 incident, in which 34-year-old Respect Mathebula died in a shootout, marks the first instance in 50 years of a ranger being killed by poachers in Kruger National Park. Yet given the intensity of rhinoceros poaching in the region, the milestone is as surprising as it is tragic.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Back from his third trip to North Korea in as many months, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo sounded buoyant.

"President Trump remains upbeat about the prospects for North Korean denuclearization. Progress is happening," he told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on July 25. "We need Chairman Kim Jong Un to follow through on his commitments that he made in Singapore."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Award-winning actor Alan Alda has revealed that he has been diagnosed with Parkinson's disease. "I'm not angry," he said.

"It hasn't stopped my life at all. I've had a richer life than I've had up until now," Alda said as he made the announcement Tuesday on CBS This Morning.

The media world that revolves around President Trump is a world of promising news, which is to say news that is mostly about promises.

The stories that dominate front pages and lead newscasts are typically about things that might happen, or could happen. And sometimes, these things actually do happen.

A U.S. government watchdog says the Afghan government "may be going back to 'business as usual' and 'simply checking the box' when it comes to fighting corruption."

In a report issued Monday, the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, or SIGAR, recorded instances of corruption in the very institutions put in place to stop it.

The U.N. has an incredibly ambitious goal of wiping out HIV transmission by the year 2030.

But global health experts say they can't execute that plan without a cheaper way to monitor the health of millions of HIV patients.

The Clinton Health Access Initiative, along with several other development agencies, has brokered an agreement to make routine HIV tests more accessible. They're aiming to make HIV viral load tests available for $12 a piece, slashing the price in some markets by more than 50 percent.

If you ask today's guest what she's been up to since the last time she was on World Cafe about a year and a half ago, she might say something like, "Oh, not much. Finished my Masters of Fine Arts, raised a toddler, toured in my husband's band the 400 unit, completed another record of my own, won Emerging Artist of the Year at the Americana Music Awards ... and slept at some point."

Uber is shutting down its self-driving truck program, nearly six months after it settled a lawsuit from Waymo, the Google spinoff that accused Uber of using its proprietary designs. Uber says it will keep working on self-driving vehicles, but it will now focus solely on cars.

"We've decided to stop development on our self-driving truck program and move forward exclusively with cars," said Eric Meyhofer, the head of Uber's advanced technologies unit.

Facebook announced that it has identified a coordinated and inauthentic political influence campaign ahead of the November midterm elections. The company said it removed at least 32 accounts and pages after an initial investigation.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Kurt Wagner (@KurtWagner8), senior editor of social media at Recode, about the announcement.

The Senate on Tuesday voted to renew the National Flood Insurance Program hours before it was set to expire during the height of hurricane season. The House passed a temporary extension for the program last week, authorizing it only through November, and the Senate followed suit Tuesday. Critics of the National Flood Insurance Program say it needs structural changes, not short-term extensions.

First-time author Tomi Adeyemi channeled her outrage over shootings of unarmed black men by police into her young adult fantasy novel “Children of Blood and Bone.”

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Adeyemi (@tomi_adeyemi) about the book, a bestseller that has been optioned for a film.

3D-Printed Gun Blueprint Published Online

4 hours ago

A number of states are suing the Trump administration for allowing the blueprint for a 3D-printed gun to be published online. The blueprint wasn’t supposed to be made public until Wednesday, but it was published early, after attempts to prevent the plans from being released.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with MSNBC anchor and economics correspondent Ali Velshi (@AliVelshi), co-host of “Velshi & Ruhle.”

Decades of academic research shows green spaces make urban dwellers happier and healthier. But finding a secret garden of your own can be tricky, which is why Toby Musgrave, garden scholar and author of “Green Escapes,” has created an encyclopedia of where to find them around the world.

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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How are President Trump’s supporters feeling about his warming relations with Russia, the Russia investigation, immigration policy and tariffs?

Here & Now‘s Robin Young checks in with one of them: Ben Clymer Jr., president of the Lincoln Club of Riverside County, California.

Two major wildfires burning in Northern California are threatening around 10,000 homes Tuesday.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with KQED reporter Sam Harnett (@SamWHarnett) about the latest news from Cal Fire, and community response to the fires.

The city of Seattle is in the midst of a historic building boom. Cranes dot the skyline and new construction is nearly everywhere you look. Because of all the activity, you might think a lot of construction workers are getting hurt.

Turns out, that’s not the case. Anna Boiko-Weyrauch (@AnnaBoikoW) from KUOW explains why.

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