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It took Sen. Ted Cruz to finally persuade me to answer a riddle that's bothered me for years. Suppose somebody yanked away the law that currently props up the nation's ethanol industry, as Cruz has proposed. What would actually happen?

Remember the story scooting around the Internet earlier this week about a man in India who was reportedly killed by a meteorite? If you need a refresher, we wrote a post about it, creatively titled, "Did A Meteorite Kill A Bus Driver In India?"

Well, it turns out the answer is probably not.

From the restorative justice practices in Rwanda to the supermax prisons in Brazil, author and educator Baz Dreisinger offers a glimpse of prison systems abroad through the prism of the mass incarceration system in the U.S.

Dreisinger visited prisons in nine countries and found that while some modeled their prisons on America’s “doing time for the crime” punishment system, others aimed to find healing and reconciliation for both victims and offenders.

"If you could go back in time and see any band play, what would you choose?" Karl Bender, one of the main characters of Mo Daviau's debut novel Every Anxious Wave, uses this question to lure customers into his incredible new enterprise: Sending music fans through a time-warping wormhole to witness any musical performance in history. Daviau also uses this question to lure readers into her story: A bittersweet, century-hopping odyssey of love, laced with weird science, music geekery, and heart-wrenching laughs.

It was a rumor that had many Twitter old-timers up in arms: Twitter is changing its signature structure of real-time posts in reverse chronological order.

It's true. The company now says it's got a new algorithm to predict which tweets you might not want to miss. Those selected tweets, minutes or hours old, will display at the top when you log in after an absence. The rest of the tweets below will remain in real-time and reverse chronology.

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Bernie Sanders are celebrating victories in the New Hampshire primary.

Here & Now’s political strategists Angela Rye and Paris Dennard join hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson to analyze the results, including what they mean for the second-place finishers, Hillary Clinton and John Kasich.

Clinton pulled in 38 percent, compared to Sanders’ 60 percent, and Kasich won 16 percent, compared to Trump’s 35 percent.

Doctors Without Borders issued a warning today about the humanitarian crisis for refugees trying to get away from the fighting in Aleppo. They are fleeing to the border with Turkey where they need food and shelter.

Meantime, the diplomatic effort to halt the fighting that has been going on since 2011 continues tomorrow in Munich, when Secretary of State John Kerry is scheduled to meet Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov.

The Granite State made clear choices in last night’s presidential primary, as both winners ended up with 20-point victories.

Republican Donald Trump took 35 percent of all the GOP votes cast and Democrat Bernie Sanders nabbed 60 percent of his party’s votes. Both candidates bill themselves as anti-establishment candidates for their respective parties.

While some contenders are considering how long to stay in the race, others are looking ahead to South Carolina and Nevada.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Growing up in the 1980s, brothers Jay and Mark Duplass weren't into typical family movies. Their friends were enthralled by Star Wars, but Jay tells Fresh Air's Ann Marie Baldonado that he and his brother were more interested in "whatever showed up on HBO," including Kramer vs. Kramer, Sophie's Choice and Hannah and Her Sisters.

French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius has announced that he will leave his post in the government.

Fabius, 69, was instrumental in forging the Iran nuclear deal and presided over climate negotiations in Paris last December that saw nearly 200 countries adopt a landmark agreement.

In a letter to president Obama, a former federal judge is asking that a sentence he handed down in 2004 be commuted.

"In looking back on the case, it was one of the most troubling that I ever faced in my five years on the federal bench," Paul G. Cassell wrote on Tuesday.

The next Tesla car is expected to be revealed and made available for pre-order next month. And while the auto world is still waiting to see specs and drawings, one thing is already known: the price.

As promised, Elon Musk tells Bloomberg, the Model 3 will cost $35,000 — before any incentives.

The Current Presents: Polica

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United Crushers, out March 4, is very Minneapolis, at least in its name. Inspired by a group of Twin Cities graffiti artists, the phrase "United Crushers" can be seen on old silos, overpasses and other infrastructure throughout the area. As with Shulamith, Polica's second album, singer Channy Leaneagh says she gravitates toward the idea of naming her records after people she admires.

It is a sad curiosity that the word "disaster" comes from star (aster), as in "an ill-starred event," owing its etymological roots to astrology.

A Russian opposition leader says he was sitting in a Moscow restaurant when about 10 men burst in, threatened to kill him and then attacked him — with a cake.

Mikhail Kasyanov is co-leader of the opposition Republican Party of Russia-People's Freedom Party (Parnas), which is planning to put forward candidates to run in Russia's parliamentary elections later this year.

NPR's Corey Flintoff tells our Newscast unit that the Kremlin is downplaying the assault. Here's more:

This week, the lights go down on another packed house at the Theatre du Chatelet, the gilded19th century theater in Paris whose name has become synonymous with grand American musical productions. The latest hit is Cole Porter's Kiss Me, Kate, which ends a sold-out 10-day run this Friday.

Call it a happy ending to a fish-out-of-water story.

Today, a one-of-a-kind, fiberglass shark cast from the same mold as the iconic, mechanical sharks used in the 1975 classic movie, JAWS, is leaving home.

After more than twenty-five years keeping watch over Aadlen Brothers Auto Wrecking, a junkyard in Sun Valley, Calif., the shark known as Bruce is headed to a museum.

This matters to me. Because the shark and I have a past.

Like many people, I used to be afraid to go in the ocean because of JAWS.

Zika Virus: What Happened When

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Since it was first discovered in Uganda in 1947, Zika virus was known mostly as a short-lived and mild illness. In 2015, that all changed. An outbreak in Brazil is suspected of causing cases of a serious birth defect, microcephaly, and a potentially crippling disease, Guillain-Barre syndrome.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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As the international community grapples with how best to stymie North Korea's nuclear development, South Korea is making one move on its own. It's shutting down the last remaining vestige of inter-Korean cooperation, the Kaesong Industrial Complex.

The special zone, located north of the border just six miles inside of North Korea, employs an estimated 55,000 North Koreans. South Korea's government and industries pay to operate the park. A total of 124 South Korean companies run businesses and factories there, mostly making goods like shoes and clothing.

Shortly after arriving in Washington for diplomatic meetings this week, Egypt's foreign minister, Sameh Hassan Shoukry, stopped by NPR to speak with Morning Edition's David Greene.

Shoukry, a veteran diplomat and former ambassador to Washington, represents the government of Abdel-Fattah el-Sisi, who led a military coup in 2013 and became president in 2014.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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New Hampshire prides itself on surprising people with the outcome of its first-in-the-nation presidential primary. This year, though, the top winner in each party was the candidate the polls had long predicted would win.

So if there was any surprise, it was that the candidates those polls had been smiling on were Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders. Less than a year ago, neither would have been thought a likely candidate, let alone a plausible winner.

After a full day of long lines at the polls and last-minute campaigning, the results came in early. Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders, who had been leading polls in the state, won the New Hampshire primary. You can catch up with the results and find out what they mean at elections.npr.org and NPRPolitics.org.

Here's how the evening unfolded, in photos:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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