World

Hardcover Nonfiction Bestsellers
5:03 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Nonfiction, Week Of May 2, 2013

Penguin Press

Michael Pollan explores the transformation of nature into food in Cooked, which debuts at No. 2.

The Salt
5:02 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Unraveling The Mystery Of A Rice Revolution

Rice farmers in Indonesia plant rice seedlings using the "system of rice intensification."
Courtesy of SRI International Network and Resources Center

It's a captivating story: A global rice-growing revolution that started with a Jesuit priest in Madagascar, far from any recognized center of agricultural innovation. Every so often, it surfaces in the popular media — most recently in The Guardian, which earlier this year described farmers in one corner of India hauling in gigantic rice harvests without resorting to pesticides or genetic modification.

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The Record
4:57 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

'A Truth Never Told': Remembering Slayer's Jeff Hanneman

Jeff Hanneman of Slayer in 2011.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 7:57 pm

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The Two-Way
4:15 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Dow Hits 15,000 For The First Time; Closes Just Shy Of The Mark

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange after the morning bell on May 1.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 4:55 pm

The stock market continues its winning streak: The Dow Jones hit another milestone today, tapping 15,000 for the first time, but closing just shy of the milestone.

This, of course, follows good news about the job market released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
4:13 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Is Massively Open Online Education A Threat Or A Blessing?

iStockphoto.com

In fall 2011, Sebastian Thrun, a research professor at Stanford, and Peter Norvig, the top scientist at Google, teamed up to develop and teach a free, online course on artificial intelligence. Their aim, as Norvig said in an impassioned and compelling TED talk, was to develop a course at least as good as, if not better than, the course they teach together at Stanford. They'd put the result online and make it available to everyone, for free.

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All Songs Considered
4:11 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

First Watch: Femi Kuti, 'The World Is Changing'

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 2:24 pm

"'The World Is Changing' is groove with a message." That quote, a pretty good summary of the music of Femi Kuti in just nine words, comes from Juan Gélas, the creative director of a new video for Kuti's new song. Femi Kuti is a saxophonist, trumpeter, keyboard player and singer and songwriter. The son of legendary afrobeat musician Fela Kuti, he carries on the tradition of mixing Nigerian beats along with jazz and a healthy dose of politics. Juan Gélas says, "Femi Kuti continues to be a leading protest artist out of modern Africa and his voice talks to us all."

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The Two-Way
4:06 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Falling In Love Again: Face-Transplant Donor's Daughter Meets Recipient

Carmen Blandin Tarleton of Thetford, Vermont, right, is embraced by Marinda Righter, daughter of face donor Cheryl Denelli-Righter, at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Mass., on Wednesday.
Charles Krupa AP

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 8:28 pm

If there's one conversation you listen to today, make it Melissa Block's talk with Carmen Blandin Tarleton and Marinda Righter.

Tarleton, who was disfigured when her estranged husband poured Lye over her body, received a face transplant in February. This week, for the first time, Tarleton met Righter, the daughter of the face donor.

Righter and Tarleton embraced and then Righter asked Tarleton if she could touch her face.

"It was probably one of the best feelings I've had in my life," Tarleton told Melissa.

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The Two-Way
4:04 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

U.S. Revises Entry Procedure For Those On Student Visas

The department of Homeland Security is changing the way border agents process those people entering the country on student visas.

"Effective immediately," the AP reports, agents will have to "verify that every international student who arrives in the U.S. has a valid student visa."

The AP adds:

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Business
3:54 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

New U.S. Trade Representative Faces Big Challenges Abroad

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 8:28 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Expanding trade abroad is a high priority for President Obama. This week, he nominated a trusted adviser named Michael Froman to become the next U.S. trade representative. Froman is currently deputy national security adviser for international economic affairs. NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports on the challenges he would face as trade representative.

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Mountain Stage
3:44 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Rusted Root On Mountain Stage

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 7:39 pm

Rusted Root released its first album, 1992's Cruel Sun, independently in the band's native Pittsburgh. It contained the group's signature song "Send Me on My Way," which Rusted Root included on its major-label debut When I Woke; that album was already beginning to climb the charts at the time of this January 1995 performance in West Virginia.

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World Cafe
2:32 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds On World Cafe

Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds.
Cat Stevens Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 3:46 pm

Australian singer-songwriter Nick Cave recently re-formed his band The Bad Seeds, minus founding member Mick Harvey on guitar, to record a new album called Push the Sky Away. On this installment of World Café, you'll hear a tremendous performance from the elegant, intensely emotive band.

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Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
1:23 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Phil Woods On Piano Jazz

On this episode of Piano Jazz, originally broadcast in 2003, alto saxophonist Phil Woods brings his quintet's rhythm section — bassist Steve Gilmore and drummer Bill Goodwin — by for a session with host Marian McPartland. Woods has been called "The New Bird," as in the heir to bop alto pioneer Charlie "Bird" Parker.

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Piano Jazz With Jon Weber
1:20 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Robben Ford On Piano Jazz

Robben Ford.
George Wells Courtesy of the artist

Ace rock guitarist and vocalist Robben Ford joins host Jon Weber on this episode of Piano Jazz for a set of traditional blues tunes, gospel standards and originals.

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Shots - Health News
1:02 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Paleo Diet Echoes Physical Culture Movement Of Yesteryear

In 1899, Macfadden published the first edition of Physical Culture, a magazine devoted to bodybuilding, health and nutrition that ran until 1952. At its peak in the 1910s, it had sales of more than 100,000 issues per month.

Etsy

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 1:18 pm

The paleo diet is sometimes ridiculed as a fad that relies on an overly rosy view of our primitive past.

But it turns out that popular health movements that advocate going back to a more natural way of living are nothing new.

Consider this quote: "It is reasonably certain that man was originally made to live and exercise in the open air, bathe in rivers, and expose his body to the healthful action of the sun."

And this one:

"Civilized man is manufacturing and eating many substances that slowly but surely lead to degeneration, disease and premature death."

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Arts & Life
12:49 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Checkmate! Teen Chess Stars Make Their Move

The 2013 U.S. and Women's Chess Championships are under way in St. Louis, Missouri. Host Michel Martin speaks with two of the competition's youngest players. Kayden Troff is the current under-14 World Youth Chess Champion, and at 15, Sarah Chiang is the youngest woman competing in the Women's Chess Championships.

NPR Story
10:49 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Ancient Earth May Have Smelled Like Rotten Eggs

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 1:03 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Imagine stepping onto the Earth two billion years ago, taking a stroll along the shores of an ancient beach near the northern edge of what today is Lake Superior. You wouldn't see any trees. They didn't hit the scene until, oh, another billion-and-a-half years. What you might see, though, if you had a microscope, were tiny bacteria-like organisms on the shore having a ball eating each other.

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NPR Story
10:49 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Living Inside the Box

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Here with us now is Flora Lichtman, our correspondent and managing editor for video. Flora, welcome.

FLORA LICHTMAN, BYLINE: Hi.

FLATOW: What wonderful stuff do you have for us this week?

LICHTMAN: Well, from the less practical or the no practical application to the very practical in this week's Video Pick.

FLATOW: Ooh.

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NPR Story
10:49 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Scientists Seek To Take The Measure of Antimatter

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY.

Up next, another installment in the continuing quest to understand antimatter, that stuff that's supposed to be the opposite of matter. It's supposed to have been created during the Big Bang in equal amounts as normal matter, but for some reason, it's all disappeared. No one knows why - yeah, that stuff or actually that anti-stuff.

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NPR Story
10:49 am
Fri May 3, 2013

17-Year Cicadas Primed To Emerge

This spring the massive "Brood II" batch of 17-year cicadas is expected to emerge from the ground in backyards and parks all along the Eastern U.S. The insects will mate, lay eggs, and start the cycle all over again. Cicada expert John Cooley explains the unusual biology and evolution of periodical cicadas.

NPR Story
10:49 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Michael Pollan: You Are What You Cook

Food writer Michael Pollan once advised "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants." Now, he tells us how to cook it. In his new book Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation, he takes a tour of the most time-tested cooking techniques, from southern whole-hog barbecue and slow-cooked ragus to sourdough baking and pickle making.

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