World

Europe
5:09 am
Thu May 21, 2015

Revelations Of British Pedophile Ring Spur Flood Of Abuse Reports

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 7:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
5:07 am
Thu May 21, 2015

U.S. Engagment Against ISIS Can't Be Timid, Retired Marine General Says

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 7:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
5:00 am
Thu May 21, 2015

ISIS Takes Control Of Syria's Ancient City Of Palmyra

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 7:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
3:42 am
Thu May 21, 2015

WHO Calls For $100 Million Emergency Fund, Doctor 'SWAT Team'

The Ebola outbreak "overwhelmed" the World Health Organization and made it clear the agency must change, WHO's director-general, Dr. Margaret Chan, said Monday in Geneva.
Fabrice Coffrini AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 8:00 pm

Nearly 3,000 delegates from around the world are gathering this week in one of the most expensive cities in Europe to debate the fate of the World Health Organization.

There's one main question on the table: Will the WHO be given the power and money it needs to be the world's leading health agency, or will it plod forward in its current state — as a weak, bureaucratic agency of the U.N. known more for providing advice than taking action.

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Asia
3:35 am
Thu May 21, 2015

Why A Chinese Government Think Tank Attacked American Scholars

The Dzungar army surrenders to Manchu officers of the Qing Dynasty in 1759 in the Ili Valley, now part of China's Xinjiang region, in this painting made several years later by Chinese and Jesuit missionary artists.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 6:23 am

Last month, a Chinese government think tank bashed history professors from Harvard, Georgetown and other leading American universities regarding things they wrote — at least 15 years ago — about events that occurred more than two centuries ago.

"This was a uniquely vitriolic attack," says Georgetown's Jim Millward. The article calls him as "arrogant," "overbearing" and an "imperialist," and dismisses Millward's and his colleagues' scholarship as "academically absurd."

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Fine Art
3:35 am
Thu May 21, 2015

'Filthy Lucre' Is A Modern Remix Of The Peacock Room's Wretched Excess

In Darren Waterston's Filthy Lucre it looks as if a wrecking ball has been slammed into Whistler's lavish work.
Hutomo Wicaksono Freer Sackler Gallery

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 3:09 pm

An artist has just converted a legendary piece of 19th-century art into an utter ruin. And two Smithsonian institutions — the Freer and Sackler galleries of Asian art — have given their blessings.

The Peacock Room at the Freer Gallery is an actual dining room from London, decorated by James McNeill Whistler in 1876. Its blue-green walls are covered with golden designs and painted peacocks. Gilded shelves hold priceless Asian ceramics. It's an expensive, lavish cocoon, rich in beauty with a dab of menace.

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It's All Politics
8:47 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Postman Who Gyrocoptered Onto Capitol Lawn Faces Two Felonies

A gyrocopter rests April 15 on the west lawn of the U.S. Capitol in Washington. Doug Hughes, a 61-year-old postal worker from Ruskin, Fla., landed the lightweight helicopter on the Capitol lawn to promote campaign finance reform. He's scheduled to enter pleas to multiple charges Thursday.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 12:39 pm

Doug Hughes, the Florida postman who gyrocoptered through Washington's anti-terrorism warning system to land on the Capitol lawn, now faces two felonies, four misdemeanors and up to 9 1/2 years in prison for his efforts.

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Science
7:49 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Chipping Away At The Mystery Of The Oldest Tools Ever Found

An ancient stone tool unearthed at the excavation site near Kenya's Lake Turkana. It's not just the shape and sharp edges that suggest it was deliberately crafted, the researchers say, but also the dozens of stone flakes next to it that were part of the same kit.
MPK-WTAP

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 7:07 pm

A scientific discovery in Kenya, first reported in April, challenges conventional wisdom about human history, say the scientists who made the discovery and are now releasing the details. The scientists say the collection of stone tools they turned up near Lake Turkana were made long before the first humans are thought to have evolved.

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The Two-Way
7:33 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Islamic State Takes Control Of Ancient City Of Palmyra

Smoke rises after a Syrian Rocket launcher shell on Islamic State positions in the ancient oasis city of Palmyra, about 215 kilometers northeast of Damascus on Tuesday. News reports say the Islamic State has taken control of the city.
EPA /Landov

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 12:35 pm

The self-declared Islamic State has taken control of Palmyra, an ancient city that's on UNESCO's list of World Heritage sites.

Palmyra and Tadmur, the modern town that adjoins it, have been the scene of recent fighting between Syrian government troops and fighters from the Islamic State. Multiple news reports say government troops left the city ahead of an advance by the rebels.

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Parallels
7:17 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

For Israel, Soccer Becomes A Geopolitical Football

FIFA President Sepp Blatter kicks a ball during the inauguration of a football stadium in the village of Dura al-Qari near the West Bank city of Ramallah on Wednesday. Blatter said he is on a "mission of peace" to resolve tensions between the Israeli and Palestinian soccer federations.
Majdi Mohammed AP

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 8:39 pm

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict has moved to the soccer field. Next week, at the annual meeting of FIFA — the international body governing football — its 209 members are scheduled to vote on a proposal to suspend Israel from international play.

Palestinian soccer officials put the proposal on FIFA's agenda, saying Israeli policies hurt Palestinian players and the sport's development and break FIFA's own rules.

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Planet Money
6:29 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Episode 625: The Last Job

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 11:05 am

There are some very smart people out there arguing that machines and computers are stealing our jobs. And that when these jobs go away, they won't be replaced. They think that in the future, there will be fewer and fewer jobs.

In the short-term, that's a big problem, but in the long-term, it could be great news. If robots are doing all the work, people can just relax, right?

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The Salt
6:08 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

McMadness: Activists Pile On At McDonald's Shareholders Meeting

Demonstrators march on McDonald's corporate headquarters in Oak Brook, Ill., on Wednesday, demanding a wage increase to $15 per hour.
Brian Kersey UPI /Landov

Whoa, I wouldn't want to be Steve Easterbrook right about now.

The newish CEO of McDonald's — who has pledged to turn the fast-food giant into a progressive burger chain — is getting an earful this week, as the company prepares to convene its annual shareholders meeting on Thursday.

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A Blog Supreme
6:06 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Bruce Lundvall, Jazz Record Executive, Has Died

Bruce Lundvall attends a ceremony hosted by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, which produces the Grammy Awards. In addition to his role as record executive, he also once served as director of the Recording Academy.
Noel Vasquez Getty Images

Bruce Lundvall, the longtime President of Blue Note Records who supported many top jazz artists over the last four decades, died yesterday, May 19. The cause was complications of Parkinson's Disease, according to a Blue Note statement. He was 79.

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The Salt
5:58 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

FDA Wants To Pull Back The Curtain, Slightly, On Farm Antibiotics

Cattle that are grass-fed and free of antibiotics and growth hormones are seen at Kookoolan Farm in Yamhill, Ore.
Don Ryan AP

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 9:16 pm

Farmers and public health advocates have been arguing for many years now about the use of antibiotics on farm animals, yet that argument takes place in a fog of uncertainty, because a lot of information simply isn't available.

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Middle East
5:34 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Netanyahu Cancels Palestinian-Only Bus Plan Just Before Scheduled Start

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 7:17 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Education
5:34 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Energy Companies Step In To Fund STEM Education

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 8:15 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Theater
5:34 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

'My Fair Lady' Couldn't Actually Dance All Night, So These Songs Had To Go

Julie Andrews starred as flower girl Eliza Doolittle in the Broadway premiere of My Fair Lady.
AP

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 7:17 pm

When a Broadway musical feels as effortlessly right as Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe's did to audiences in 1956, it's easy to imagine that it simply sprang to life that way. Not My Fair Lady. The musical, based on George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion, is filled to bursting with some of the best-known songs in Broadway history — "The Rain In Spain," "Wouldn't It Be Loverly," "On the Street Where You Live" — but it turns out the show originally had other tunes that almost nobody knows.

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Movies
4:56 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

An Indian Master Returns To Cinemas, Restored

Subir Banerjee plays the young Apu in Pather Panchali, which made its New York debut 60 years ago this month.
Courtesy of Janus Films

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 8:19 am

In the crowded field of postwar cinema, Satyajit Ray broke through barriers of language and culture to become the most celebrated Indian filmmaker in the West.

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Planet Money
4:56 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

How A Machine Learned To Spot Depression

Institute for Creative Technologies

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 7:53 am

I'm in a booth with a computer program called Ellie. She's on a screen in front of me.

Ellie was designed to diagnose post-traumatic stress disorder and depression, and when I get into the booth she starts asking me questions — about my family, my feelings, my biggest regrets.

Emotions seem really messy and hard for a machine to understand. But Skip Rizzo, a psychologist who helped design Ellie, thought otherwise.

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Iraq
4:56 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Fall Of Ramadi Highlights 'Fundamental Failure' Of U.S. Strategy In Iraq

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 7:17 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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