World

Simon Says
9:05 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Let's Play Two! Remembering Chicago Cub Ernie Banks

Chicago Cub Ernie Banks, right, told NPR's Scott Simon, left, in 2014 that he had a lot of fun winning games, but the main thing in his life was "making friends."
Peter Breslow NPR

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 12:00 pm

Every Saturday just before our show begins I get on the public address system here to announce to our crew, "It's a beautiful day for a radio show. Let's do two today!"

It's an admiring imitation of Ernie Banks, the Chicago Cubs Hall of Fame baseball player who died last night at the age of 83. Ernie used to say, especially in the long years of hot summers — including this last one, when the Cubs were stuck in last place — "It's a beautiful day for a ballgame. Let's play two today!"

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The Two-Way
8:59 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Ukraine Rebel Leader Claims New Attack On Mariupol

Ukrainian servicemen stand guard on a street near a burning building after a shelling by pro-Russian rebels of a residential sector in Mariupol, eastern Ukraine, on Saturday.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 1:30 pm

Updated at 10:15 a.m. ET

A main leader of Russian-backed rebels in eastern Ukraine reportedly says the separatists have launched an attack on the port city of Mariupol, where rocket fire killed at least 15 people in an open-air market and residential area.

"Today an offensive was launched on Mariupol. This will be the best possible monument to all our dead," Alexander Zakharchenko was quoted as saying by Russia's RIA news agency.

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Latin America
8:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

In Argentinian Murder Mystery, Prosecutor's Death Spawns Many Suspects

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 3:32 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Europe
8:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Foe Of 'Fiscal Waterboarding' Leads Going Into Greek Election

The leader of Greece's left-wing Syriza party Alexis Tsipras casts his ballot in Athens on Sunday. His anti-austerity party was ahead in earlier polling.
Aris Messinis Getty Images

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 4:58 am

Years of austerity have worn down Greeks, who will choose a new government Sunday. Greek voters are expected to elect the first anti-austerity party in the Eurozone.

Maria Tsitoura, one of those voters, is a lively grandmother in her 70s. Like many retirees in Greece, she shares her small pension with her grown children, whose salaries have dropped by more than half in the last four years.

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National Security
8:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

The Drone War's Bottleneck: Too Many Targets, Not Enough Pilots

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 1:36 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Asia
8:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Obama's India Visit Arrives At A Moment Of Optimism

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 4:15 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Middle East
8:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Netanyahu Speech To Congress Is High-Risk, High-Reward, Analysts Say

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will address a joint session of Congress about Iran on March 3. The White House was not consulted on the invitation.
Oded Balilty AP

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 7:50 pm

The Obama administration's rocky relations with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu got rockier this week, and Israelis are watching the spat nervously.

In the president's state of the union speech Tuesday, he asked Congress to allow more time for nuclear talks with Iran before imposing any new sanctions.

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Technology
8:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Facebook Aims To Weed Fakes From Your News Feed

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 12:11 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
8:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Remembering Ernie Banks, A Fan Favorite Whose Favorite Was The Fans

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 11:29 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Music
8:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Rainy Day Women Ages 55 And Up: Bob Dylan Makes Cover Of AARP Magazine

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 12:00 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The times they are a-changin'. But should you ever doubt that, the cover and featured interview in the next issue of the AARP Magazine will be Bob Dylan.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "FOREVER YOUNG")

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Media
8:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

From A Frequent Flier To SkyMall, Thanks For The Memory Foams

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 12:08 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

All Songs Considered
8:03 am
Sat January 24, 2015

The Good Listener: If You Don't Like Music, Do You Have A Soul?

Music isn't for everyone.
Cristian Casanelles iStockphoto

We get a lot of mail at NPR Music, and alongside the tiara we ordered as the grand prize at our upcoming eating contest is a slew of smart questions about how music fits into our lives — and, this week, thoughts on people who simply don't enjoy music.

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Author Interviews
7:59 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Two Outcasts Form An Artistic Bond In 'Mr. Mac And Me'

Esther Freud is the author of Hideous Kinky, The Sea House, and other novels.
Courtesy of Bloomsbury Publishing

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 11:49 am

Thomas Maggs is a lonely little boy. When Esther Freud's new novel Mr. Mac And Me opens, he is 13 years old. His brothers have died, his father, who runs a bar, drinks too much of his own stock and beats his son. Thomas dreams of sailing away – and then World War I descends on his small English sea coast town. Tours stop coming, blackout curtains go up, village boys enlist and go off to war.

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Goats and Soda
7:03 am
Sat January 24, 2015

'En Garde' Takes On New Urgency In A Duel With Machetes

Machete master Alfred Avril instructs his son, Jean-Paul.
Richard Patterson Courtesy of Sundance Institute

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 8:16 am

Two men are sparring on a wooded slope in Haiti. Each has one hand behind his back. From afar, it looks as if they're fencing. But instead of using swords, the men are wielding machetes.

Yes, you read that right. They are aiming machetes at each other.

The older man is "Professor" Alfred Avril, a 70-year-old Haitian farmer who is also a master of tire machet, or Haitian machete fencing. He's quick but deliberate in his movements. His son and student, Jean-Paul, sways backward, descending to the ground to dodge the strikes.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Do You Have To Read 'Frog'? No, But You Might Want To

Mo Yan won the Nobel Prize for literature in 2012.
Yin Li

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 11:35 am

There are books you read because you want to read them and there are books you read because you have to read them. The former category can include anything that tickles your particular fancies — teenage wizards, goopy aliens, hunky Scotsmen, shark attack survivors, the history of Vladislav's Wallachia, whatever Malcolms your Cowley.

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The Two-Way
1:01 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Chicago Cubs Legend Ernie Banks, 1st Black Player In Team History, Dies

The Chicago Cubs' Ernie Banks poses in 1970. The Cubs announced Friday night that Banks had died. The team did not provide any further details. Banks was 83.
AP

Baseball's Chicago Cubs report that Hall of Fame shortstop Ernie Banks has died. "Mr. Cub," who began his career in the Negro leagues, was the first black player for the team — eighth in the majors overall — and played in 14 All-Star games in his 19 seasons, all with the Cubs.

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The Two-Way
9:01 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

4-Year Prison Term For Colorado Woman Over Plot To Join ISIS

Shannon Conley's parents, Ana and John Conley, exit the U.S. Federal Courthouse in Denver following their daughter's plea hearing in September 2014.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 11:30 am

Shannon Conley, 19, has been sentenced to four years in prison for trying to travel to Turkey and work as a nurse for the extremist group ISIS. Conley reached a plea agreement over charges of trying to provide support for the terrorist group last fall.

When she was arrested, Conley was living in the Denver suburb of Arvada, where she had initially raised suspicions by visiting the grounds of a church and making notes and drawings. She was arrested months later, after several warnings from FBI agents.

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Planet Money
7:22 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

Episode 598: The Very First Short

The first stock exchange was on this bridge

We decided to experience firsthand what it's like to short something — bet that something will go down in value. You can short individual stocks. But we decided to go big. We make what one expert calls the "Armageddon Trade." We shorted the entire stock market. We shorted America.

So far, America is winning. And we are losing.

There have been short sellers throughout history. Today on the show, we tell the story of a man who was the very first short seller. The very first person to bet that a stock will go down. It does not go well for him.

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The Salt
7:20 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

Will Environmentalists Fall For Faux Fish Made From Plants?

Chef James Corwell's nigiri sushi rolls made with Tomato Sushi, a plant-based tuna alternative, in San Francisco.
Alastair Bland for NPR

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 7:39 pm

It's a dead ringer for Ahi tuna sashimi. It cuts into glistening slivers that are firm and juicy. And it's got a savory bite.

But this flesh-like food is not fish. It's made of tomato, and it's what San Francisco chef James Corwell hopes could be one small step toward saving imperiled species of fish, like bluefin tuna.

"What I want is to create a great sushi experience without the tuna," Corwell tells The Salt.

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The Two-Way
7:04 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

'Modern Farmer' Owner Says It Will Live On, Despite Staff Exit

Modern Farmer has a particular fondness for stories about anything having to do with goats.
Courtesy of Modern Farmer

A hip chronicle of ag life isn't dead yet, the owner of Modern Farmer says. The National Magazine Award winner lost its last paid editorial staff Friday, The New York Times reports. But the story comes with a clarification: Modern Farmer's owner says he'll publish again this summer.

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