World

The Two-Way
8:49 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Scores Killed In Brazilian Nightclub Blaze

A man carries an injured victim of a fire at the Kiss club in Santa Maria city, Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil, on Sunday.
AP

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 1:46 pm

Update at 12:15 p.m. ET Toll Revised

Here's the most-recent information we have on the deadly fire in Santa Maria:

-- Maj. Cleberson Bastianello Braida now says 232 people were killed – and not 245 as had been reported earlier. He said 117 people had been hospitalized. He made the announcement at a news conference in the Municipal Sports Center.

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Latin America
6:55 am
Sun January 27, 2013

U.S. Trains Mexico On Tactics Used Against Al-Qaida

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 10:00 am

The Pentagon is expanding a program to training Mexican security forces fighting drug cartels. The training incorporates some of the same strategies the U.S. military has used against al-Qaida. Rachel Martin talks with Associated Press reporter Kimberly Dozier, who first reported the story.

Energy
6:55 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Not-So-Clean Energy Efforts In Italy Under Investigation

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 10:00 am

The Washington Post reported this week that Italy's effort to promote solar and wind power isn't so clean. A recent sting operation by the Italian government of the renewable energy sector resulted in the arrest of a dozen mafia figures.

Sports
6:55 am
Sun January 27, 2013

How To Handle The Waiting Game In Sports

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 10:00 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now it's time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

MARTIN: OK. This week, we are going classic, like classical. Like, really old school, you know, Rome, Cicero, Latin. We're talking Latin this week. Specifically we want to talk about interregna or interregnum, if you please, which is a fancy way of saying a gap. Because the NFL is in the middle of a big old interregnum at the moment.

And for more, we are joined by, who else, but our own Marcus Aurelius, NPR's Mike Pesca. Hey, Mike.

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Africa
6:55 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Latest Battle In Mali Has Deep Roots

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 10:00 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

For some historical context on the fighting in Mali, we spoke with Gregory Mann. He's an associate professor of history at Columbia University and he's an expert on North Africa, including the area in northern Mali now controlled by insurgents.

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Europe
6:55 am
Sun January 27, 2013

The Love Song That Marked A Shift In French-German Relations

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 10:00 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

As we just heard, Germans are still figuring out how to live with their military history. We're going to take you back now to the 1960s, when one French singer helped Europeans forgive, if not forget, the horrors of the Second World War. And she did it with this song:

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

BARBARA: (Singing in Foreign language)

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Africa
6:55 am
Sun January 27, 2013

In Fight Against Extremists, Mali Is Far From Alone

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 11:05 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. The French-led military intervention in Mali is picking up momentum in the campaign to help the Malian government recapture Islamist-occupied strongholds in the north. And while French airpower has tipped the scales in the Malian government's favor, the question now is whether Mali's beleaguered army is up to the fight. NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports from Bamako, Mali's capital city in the south.

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Europe
6:55 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Troop Deployment No Long Sparks Mass Protests In Germany

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 10:00 am

After two devastating world wars, Germans recoiled from any prospect of military intervention. But today, German troops are posted in Afghanistan and engage in combat. This week, German lawmakers are expected to extend their country's military's mission in Afghanistan for 13 more months.

The Picture Show
6:08 am
Sun January 27, 2013

An Iconic 'Life' Image You Must See

U.S. Marine in Vietnam, October 1966.
Larry Burrows—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

"Larry Burrows made a photograph that, for generations, has served as the most indelible, searing illustration of the horrors inherent in that long, divisive war — and, by implication, in all wars."

That's according to Ben Cosgrove, editor of LIFE.com. He is referring to the image above, made in 1966 and titled Reaching Out.

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Remembrances
5:45 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Saying Goodbye To Bedford Street's Tireless Collector

Alice Elliott, producer of the documentary The Collector of Bedford Street, laughs with Larry Selman in 2003. Selman died Jan. 20. He was 70.
Gregory Bull AP

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 3:54 pm

Larry Selman devoted more than half his life collecting money for multiple charities, on the streets of New York, from total strangers. He did this for nearly 40 years, despite the fact he was developmentally disabled. Selman became the subject of filmmaker Alice Elliott's Oscar-nominated documentary, The Collector of Bedford Street. He died Jan.

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Commentary
5:37 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Oysters Rebound In Popularity With Man-Made Bounty

Along the East Coast, wild oysters have been disappearing, but the number of farm-raised oysters is exploding.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 10:00 am

In Colonial Virginia, oysters were plentiful; Capt. John Smith said they lay "thick as stones." But as the wild oyster harvest has shrunk, Weekend Edition food commentator Bonny Wolf says the market for farm-raised oysters is booming.

The local food movement is expanding from fertile fields to brackish waters.

Along the rivers and bays of the East Coast, where wild oysters have been decimated by man and nature, harvests of farm-raised oysters are increasing by double digits every year. At the same time, raw oyster bars are all the rage.

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Animals
5:34 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Like Sumo Wrestling, With Lots Of Spit: Camels Tussle In Turkey

Two camels fight during the Camel Wrestling Championship in the town of Selcuk, near the western coastal city of Ismir, Turkey, on Jan. 15, 2012. It's the biggest event of the camel-wrestling season in Turkey.
Tolga Bozoglu EPA /Landov

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 10:00 am

"Obama vs. Rambo" may sound like an Onion headline for the gun control debate. But it's actually a must-see matchup for spectators on Turkey's Aegean Coast. The competitors? Two male, or bull, camels.

The biggest event of Turkey's camel wrestling season takes place each year in the town of Selcuk, near the ancient ruins of Ephesus.

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Music Interviews
5:33 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Trixie Whitley: Songs For A Charmed — And Checkered — Life

Trixie Whitley first emerged several years ago as the lead singer of the Daniel Lanois project Black Dub. Her debut as a solo artist is called Fourth Corner.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 10:00 am

In 2010, a young, Belgian-born, blues-rock singer burst onto the scene as the voice of Black Dub, a musical project founded by producer Daniel Lanois.

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Music
5:32 am
Sun January 27, 2013

New Latin Music For 2013

The Oakland, Ca. ensemble Candelaria is one of Alt.Latino's artists to watch for 2013.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 10:00 am

What better way to fight off the winter blues than with some good music? Felix Contreras and Jasmine Garsd, hosts of NPR's Alt.Latino podcast, return to Weekend Edition Sunday to share some exciting releases from the coming year.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "NO. NO. NO.")

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Latin America
5:31 am
Sun January 27, 2013

'Sick And Tired,' Residents In Southern Mexico Defend Themselves

Masked and armed men guard a roadblock near the town of Ayutla, Mexico, on Jan. 18. Hundreds of men in the southern Mexican state of Guerrero have taken up arms to defend their villages against drug gangs.
Dario Lopez-Mills AP

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 10:00 am

On the main road into the Mexican town of Ayutla, about 75 miles southeast of Acapulco, about a dozen men cradling shotguns and rusted machetes stand guard on a street corner. Their faces are covered in black ski masks.

The men are part of a network of self-defense brigades, formed in the southern state of Guerrero to combat the drug traffickers and organized crime gangs that terrorize residents.

The brigades have set up roadblocks, arrested suspects and are set on running the criminals out of town.

Taking Control

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Sunday Puzzle
5:31 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Two Blanks For The Price Of One

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 10:00 am

On-air challenge: You will be given some sentences with two blanks. Add the letters E and Y to the word that goes in the first blank to get a new word that goes in the second blank to compete the sentence.

Last week's challenge: Take the last name of a famous world leader of the past. Rearrange the letters to name a type of world leader, like czar or prime minister. What world leader is it?

Answer: (Golda) Meir; emir

Winner: Daniel Fisher of Westport, Conn.

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U.S.
6:29 pm
Sat January 26, 2013

Investing In Citizenship: For The Rich, A New Road To The U.S.

The Barclays Center in New York, the new home of the Brooklyn Nets, was built partially with investment from overseas donors seeking U.S. citizenship. A little-known immigration program allows wealthy investors to get a green card in exchange for funding American businesses.
Bruce Bennett Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 2:17 pm

The traditional immigrant story is a familiar one.

Someone who longs for a better life makes the tough journey, leaves behind the hardships of his or her native land and comes to the United States to start again. That story, in a lot of ways, helped build this country.

These days, however, there's a very different kind of immigrant who wants to come to this country — the rich — and they have a different set of dreams.

Anthony Korda was a barrister, or lawyer, in England who vacationed frequently in the U.S. with his family.

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Author Interviews
5:40 pm
Sat January 26, 2013

Ship Those (Virtual) Chips: The Rise And Fall Of Online Poker's Youngest Crew

Ship It Holla Ballas by Jonathan Grotenstein and Storms Reback.
Guy Bubb Courtesy Getty Images/Gallo Images

Originally published on Sat January 26, 2013 6:59 pm

In the early 2000s, the get-rich-quick scheme of choice for young college dropouts was poker — and not your grandfather's poker, with clinking chips on green felt tables. Online poker. For a few years it was a national obsession for a generation of young men who grew up playing hours and hours of video games.

Many of these players couldn't get into casinos because they were underage, but they used their brains and introductory statistics courses to rake in millions, often playing 10 or more games simultaneously on huge computer monitors.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
5:02 pm
Sat January 26, 2013

The Movie Jeffrey Wright Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Dennis Hopper, Martin Sheen, and Frederic Forrest survey a temple in a scene from Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now.
United Artist Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 26, 2013 6:34 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

For actor Jeffrey Wright, whose credits include Basquiat, Syriana, W. and Broken City (currently playing in theaters) — the movie he could watch a million times is Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now.

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Music Interviews
5:02 pm
Sat January 26, 2013

After 17 Years, Adam Ant Transforms Again

Adam Ant's first album in 17 years, Adam Ant is the Blueblack Hussar in Marrying the Gunner's Daughter, is an ersatz musical memoir.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat January 26, 2013 7:14 pm

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