World

Books
3:00 am
Tue October 16, 2012

Technology Helps Track A Terrorist In 'The Finish'

Anonymous AP

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 10:45 am

In late summer 2010, at the end of a morning briefing, one of President Obama's security advisers said, "Mr. President, Leon and the guys at Langley think they may have come up with something." The adviser was referring to then-CIA Director Leon Panetta, and to a possible lead on the country's most wanted terrorist: Osama bin Laden.

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Music News
2:03 am
Tue October 16, 2012

Jason Lytle Balances The Studio And A Life Outdoors

Former Grandaddy frontman Jason Lytle just released a new album, Dept. of Disappearance.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 10:45 am

Jason Lytle is the man behind the Modesto, Calif., band Grandaddy. The band released its debut in 1997, but it was Grandaddy's second album — The Sophtware Slump — that broke through with critics and fans. Even David Bowie called himself a fan when he approached the band members after seeing them play.

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NPR Ombudsman
6:35 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Hearing Is Believing: A Comparison of Romney and Obama Sound Bites

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama after the Presidential Debate on Oct. 3, 2012 in Denver, Colo.
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu December 6, 2012 3:27 pm

You are sure of what you heard: NPR is giving more air time to presidential challenger Mitt Romney than to President Barack Obama.

Some listeners say the opposite, but during this election cycle and immediate past ones, the complaints have been running heavily in your direction of detecting a Republican bias in the use of sound bites. (Where are you NewsBusters?)

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This Is NPR
6:33 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

2013 NPR Wall Calendar: March

Dadu Shin NPR

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 4:40 pm

"Through NPR, I travel to places I can't usually go. I enjoy the storytelling aspect of radio. Even in interviews, people talk about their experiences and their stories. I feel like NPR allows me to temporarily go to different places and connects me to experiences and events I wouldn't have the knowledge of otherwise."

Dadu Shin
@dadushin
Listens to WNYC, New York, NY

Asia
6:11 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

King Sihanouk, An Artist And Architect Of Cambodia

Cambodia's beloved "King Father" Norodom Sihanouk led the country from French colonial rule to independence, through the Vietnam War and the terror of the Khmer Rouge. He died at age 89 of a heart attack Monday in Beijing.
Xinhua Landov

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 5:37 pm

Cambodia's former King Norodom Sihanouk dominated his country's politics through more than a half century of foreign invasion, genocide and civil war.

The monarch of the small Southeast Asian country, who often felt himself better suited to art than to statecraft, died of a heart attack Monday in Beijing, where he was receiving medical treatment. He as 89.

"The King Father," as Sihanouk was known in Cambodia, spent many years in exile in the Chinese capital, beginning in 1970.

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Business
6:11 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Red Bull's Brand As Powerful As Its Beverage

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 10:10 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

Yesterday millions of people watched a man free fall from 24 miles above earth, breaking the sound barrier, and then watched as Felix Baumgartner glided down into the New Mexico desert.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Here he's coming. And there you can see by the approaching shadow, he's just about there. (Unintelligible) the world record holder.

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Business
6:11 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Softbank Buys $20 Billion Stake In Sprint-Nextel

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 6:46 pm

Japan's Softbank has announced it will spend $20 billion to take a majority stake in Sprint-Nextel. The deal will provide Sprint, the third largest carrier in the U.S. market, with some much needed cash. It also gives Softbank the opening it's been looking for to break into the U.S. market.

Around the Nation
6:11 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Americans Win Economics Nobel For Market Design

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 6:46 pm

Two Americans, Alvin Roth and Lloyd Shapley, have won the 2012 Nobel Prize in Economics. Their research on market design has found many practical applications. It's at the heart of the system used to match medical school graduates with residency programs and is even used in the market that matches human organ donors and recipients.

Europe
6:11 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Scotland To Vote On Independence From U.K.

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 6:46 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Scotland took a step towards independence today, at least a step towards a vote on the subject. British Prime Minister David Cameron met in Edinburgh with the head of the semiautonomous Scottish government. And together, they signed off on an independence referendum to be held in two years.

But as Vicki Barker reports, it's not clear people in Scotland want independence.

VICKI BARKER, BYLINE: The two men smiled as they exchange copies of the agreement for each other to sign.

ALEX SALMOND: Here, there you go.

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This Is NPR
5:44 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

NPR In The News: Rise And Shine Edition

Renee Montagne in studio, 2007
Stephen Voss NPR

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 4:22 pm

"'Good morning...' And she's off. Here in the soundproof studio, though, 'Good night' seems like the more appropriate greeting. It is only 1:45 a.m."

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This Is NPR
5:44 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

"America's Got Talent" Winner Terry Fator Loves NPR

Terry Factor at NPR Member Station KNPR.
Christopher Smith KNPR

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 12:57 pm

Nevada Public Radio sent us this photo of ventriloquist and comedian Terry Fator, winner of NBC's America's Got Talent, showing some NPR love (along with his friend "Winston").

Last month Fator performed two shows at The Mirage Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, NV, supporting KNPR.

The Two-Way
5:36 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

'My Way,' OK; But Singing 'Someone Like You' At A Funeral? Isn't That Wrong?

Adele singing Someone Like You at the 2011 MTV Video Music Awards in Los Angeles. That's one way to say goodbye.
Mario Anzuoni Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 9:38 pm

Of course My Way — the Frank Sinatra version — is the most requested contemporary song at funerals in the U.K., according to Co-operative Funeralcare.

That makes sense.

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Monkey See
5:03 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Culture Yourself: October 15, 2012

In the tradition of forgotten features returning from the dead, please welcome back Culture Yourself, an afternoon post wrapping up some of our arts and culture coverage you might have missed.

Today's All Things Considered features an interview with John Hawkes, who was in Winter's Bone and Martha Marcy May Marlene, and whose new movie, The Sessions, is (just my two cents) terrific.

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It's All Politics
4:58 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Romney's Business Skills Evident In His Strong Debating Style

Mitt Romney at the first presidential debate at the University of Denver on Oct. 3.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 5:07 pm

If there was any surprise in the first 90-minute presidential debate, it was President Obama's apathetic performance, not Mitt Romney's energetic and assertive pounding of the commander in chief.

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NPR Story
4:54 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Pakistani Girl Shot By Taliban Transported To U.K.

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 10:12 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

In recent days, the name Malala has reverberated around the world. She's the Pakistani schoolgirl who was shot in the head by the Taliban. She was targeted because she blogged about what life is like for a child living under Islamist militant rule and she publicly campaigning against Islamist' ban on girls' education.

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The Two-Way
4:51 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Bosnia Begins Work On First Census Since Its Bloody Civil War

July 11, 2012: A woman cried next to the coffin of her relative at the Potocari memorial complex near Srebrenica. More than 8,000 Muslim men and boys were executed there in July 1995. It was the worst massacre in Europe since World War II.
Marko Drobnjakovic AP

Population censuses aren't normally something to get excited over. But for Bosnia, a nation that hasn't counted its own people in over two decades and has its eye on becoming part of the European Union, even a pilot census is of great importance. No formal national count has taken place since before the breakup of Yugoslavia, and the subsequent ethnic conflict that shocked the world.

Today, Bosnia began a two-week test census, targeting around 15,000 people, in order to gauge how prepared it is for an official, nation-wide census in the spring of 2013.

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The Two-Way
4:08 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Debate Preview: Romney Aide On How GOP Nominee Would Confront Iran

Dan Senor, a senior adviser to Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney.
Jason Reed Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 10:45 am

  • Romney adviser Dan Senor talking with NPR's Steve Inskeep

A President Mitt Romney would make the "military option" a credible threat in the effort to keep Iran from developing nuclear weapons by repeatedly saying that it "remains on the table, that it is real" and by making sure that senior officials don't imply otherwise, a top foreign policy adviser to the 2012 Republican presidential nominee tells Morning Edition.

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Tiny Desk Concerts
4:08 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Dirty Three: Tiny Desk Concert

Dirty Three plays a Tiny Desk Concert on Sept. 24.
Lauren Rock NPR

Every member of Dirty Three has a highly respectable career outside of the band: Violinist Warren Ellis works closely with Nick Cave, drummer Jim White is a sought-after collaborator with an instantly recognizable sound, and guitarist Mick Turner has released a string of gorgeous instrumental solo albums when he's not working as a visual artis

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Solve This
3:59 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Candidates' Views On Poverty Get Little Attention

People eat a free community meal at The Center in Lima, Ohio, earlier this year. Although more than 46 million Americans are poor, the issue has gotten little attention in the presidential race.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 6:46 pm

The nation's poverty rate is as high as it's been in almost two decades. Last year, 1 in 6 Americans was poor — more than 46 million people, including 16 million children.

But on the campaign trail, the issue of poverty has received surprisingly little attention.

When he first ran for president, Barack Obama went to a low-income neighborhood in Washington, D.C., and spoke passionately about hunger and poverty. He repeated Bobby Kennedy's question in 1967: "How can a country like this allow it?"

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Shots - Health Blog
3:59 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Wiping Out Polio: How The U.S. Snuffed Out A Killer

On April 12, 1955, Dr. Jonas Salk and his research team at the University of Pittsburgh released the first successful vaccine for polio. In 1979, the U.S. reported its last case of the paralyzing virus.
Courtesy of Images from the History of Medicine (NLM).

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 2:55 pm

Sixty years ago, polio was one of the most feared diseases in the U.S.

As the weather warmed up each year, panic over polio intensified. Late summer was dubbed "polio season." Public swimming pools were shut down. Movie theaters urged patrons not to sit too close together to avoid spreading the disease. Insurance companies started selling polio insurance for newborns.

The fear was well grounded. By the 1950s, polio had become one of the most serious communicable diseases among children in the United States.

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