World

Book Reviews
2:37 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

Do You Believe In Ghosts? You Might After Reading This Book

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 6:13 pm

Who doesn't love a good ghost story? The unseen hand moving a cup or the shadow climbing a staircase promises an existence beyond our mundane realities. Hannah Nordhaus' new book, American Ghost, is an offbeat mishmosh of memoir, cultural history, genealogical detective story and paranormal investigation, but it opens in the classic manner of spooky tales — with a sighting.

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NPR Story
2:06 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

A Crisis In Slow Motion: California Enters Fourth Year Of Drought

Low water levels are visible at Lake McClure on March 24, 2015, in La Grange, California. More than 3,000 residents in the Sierra Nevada foothill community of Lake Don Pedro who rely on water from Lake McCLure could potentially run out of water in the near future if the severe drought continues. Lake McClure is currently at 7 percent of its normal capacity and residents are under mandatory 50 percent water use restrictions. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Today the California State Senate will take up an emergency $1.1 billion water management bill. That legislation has the support of the governor and the leaders of both political parties, and is expected to pass easily.

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NPR Story
2:06 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

Giving Up The Concert Stage To Teach

Piano instructor Seymour Bernstein, left, poses with actor Ethan Hawke. Hawke made a documentary about Bernstein called "Seymour: An Introduction," which has won raves on the festival circuit. (Robin Holland/IFC Films via AP)

Seymour Bernstein fell in love with the piano at an early age and built a stellar concert career. But when he was 50, Seymour decided to give it up to devote his time to writing and teaching.

Now 88, Seymour Bernstein is the focus of the documentary “Seymour: An Introduction,” directed by actor Ethan Hawke. Here & Now’s Robin Young talks to Bernstein about his life and the film.

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NPR Story
1:47 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

U.S. Universities Accept Record Number of Foreign Students

International students are pictured at Purdue University, which ranks second in the U.S. for its population of foreign students. (purdue.edu)

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 2:06 pm

A new report released today by the Department of Homeland Security, says the number of international students being accepted by American universities is at an all-time high of 1.13 million. The number accepted is up 14 percent from last year, and nearly 50 percent from 2010.

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NPR Story
1:47 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

Manatee Count Is Up And How Dogs Helped Take Neanderthals Down

A baby manatee born on April 24, 2014, swims at the Zoo Parc of Beauval on July 19, 2014. (Guillaume Souvant/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 2:06 pm

The manatee population is up to 6,063, which is record number, according to Florida’s state wildlife commission. But with the increase in population, the blubbery marine mammals run the risk of losing their endangered status and protections.

Vicki Croke of WBUR’s The Wild Life speaks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about manatees and other animal news, including elephants and the downfall of Neanderthals.

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NPR Story
1:47 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

From The Battle Field To The Farm Field

Air Force veteran Sara Creech moved from Florida to a 43-acre farm in North Salem, Ind., to build Blue Yonder Organic Farm. (John Wendle for Harvest Public Media)

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 2:06 pm

Many of the millions of veterans deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan have returned home to resume civilian lives and civilian careers. But it can be a tough transition. Congress wants to help jumpstart the process. And for some, that means a second life on the farm. From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Abby Wendle of Harvest Public Media has the story.

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NPR Story
1:47 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

Kraft And Heinz To Merge, Bringing Together Prominent American Brands

(Photo Illustration by Oli Scarff/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 2:06 pm

Heinz Co. is buying Kraft Foods Group, in a deal that will form the world’s fifth-largest food and beverage company.

The new company will be called Kraft Heinz Co. and will have revenue of $28 billion, bringing together American brands from Jell-O and Kool-Aid to Heinz Ketchup and Bagel Bites.

CNN business reporter Maggie Lake joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson with details.

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NPR Story
1:47 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

Indiana Governor To Sign Controversial 'Religious Freedom' Bill

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 4:09 pm

The governor of Indiana is expected to sign a controversial religious freedom bill that aims to protect business owners who say it violates their beliefs to serve gay couples.

Opponents say the bill would allow businesses to discriminate. The organizers of Gen Con, a big gaming convention held every year in Indianapolis, are threatening to leave the state over the bill.

The Republican-controlled Indiana legislature gave final passage to the bill yesterday. Indiana would become the 20th state with a law of this kind.

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NPR Story
1:47 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

With New App, StoryCorps Hopes To 'Collect The Wisdom Of Humanity'

(Screenshot from storycorps.me)

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 2:06 pm

If you’re a regular public radio listener, chances are you’ve heard a StoryCorps conversation – and maybe even shed a tear. The ongoing oral history project, which is the brain child of Dave Isay, has recorded more than 65,000 interviews over the past 11 years, and archived them at the Library of Congress.

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Planet Money
1:40 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

Episode 443: Don't Believe The Hype

The over-hyped Dow
Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 2:11 pm

Turn on the news on any given day, and you're likely to hear about the Dow Jones industrial average. It's one of the most frequently cited measures of U.S. economic health.

But the Dow is a seriously flawed stock index, and it's certainly not the best way to measure what's going on in the overall economy.

On today's show, we rain on the Dow's parade and explain why a lot of very smart people say we should ignore the Dow.

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Mountain Stage
1:38 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

Charlie Worsham On Mountain Stage

Charlie Worsham.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Charlie Worsham makes his second appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live on the campus of West Virginia University in Morgantown. Originally from Grenada, Miss., Worsham appeared on the Grand Ole Opry in 1998 as a 12-year-old bluegrass banjo prodigy. He went on to study production and recording engineering at the Berklee School of Music, and began to include pop and rock sounds in his songwriting. He landed a deal with a publishing company after moving to Nashville, and before long was playing with the band KingBilly.

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The Salt
1:29 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

Meet The Cool Beans Designed To Beat Climate Change

These beans, grown on test plots at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture in Colombia, can thrive in temperatures that cripple most conventional beans.
Courtesy of CIAT/Neil Palmer

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 5:16 pm

A planet that is warming at extraordinary speed may require extraordinary new food crops. The latest great agricultural hope is beans that can thrive in temperatures that cripple most conventional beans. They're now growing in test plots of the International Center for Tropical Agriculture, or CIAT, in Colombia.

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SXSW Music Festival
1:12 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

Stromae, Live In Concert: SXSW 2015

Stromae proved to the audience at Stubb's in Austin why he's a major star just about everywhere but the U.S.
Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 6:52 pm

All over SXSW, kiosks were plastered with posters that posed a provocative question: "Who the hell is Stromae?"

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Europe
12:40 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

Germanwings Disaster Marks First Crash For The Budget Airliner

The airline operating the plane that crashed in the French Alps says the plane had been inspected and found safe Monday. Officials in the German town that lost 16 schoolchildren in the disaster say there will be no classes tomorrow, but children will be welcomed for counseling.

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The Two-Way
11:51 am
Wed March 25, 2015

U.S. Confirms It Is Supporting Saudi Military Operations In Yemen

People seek shelter amid gunfire at an army base in Yemen's southern port city of Aden on Wednesday.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 7:00 am

Update at 2 a.m. ET Thursday: U.S. Confirms It Is Supporting Saudi Military Operations

In a statement late Wednesday night, National Security Council spokesperson Bernadette Meehan said:

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Goats and Soda
11:32 am
Wed March 25, 2015

How Did Ebola Volunteers Know Where To Go In Liberia? Crowdsourcing!

Kpetermeni Siakor (left), a Liberian who is studying in Ghana, used crowdsourcing software to help out during the Ebola epidemic.
Courtesy of Ashesi University College

From more than 900 miles away, Kpetermeni Siakor helped get volunteers to the right neighborhoods in his native Liberia during the height of the Ebola epidemic.

He did it with Ushahidi, crowdsourcing software that was developed in Kenya in 2008, when the country experienced a wave of post-election violence. The word Ushahidi means testimony in Swahili.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:56 am
Wed March 25, 2015

Cross The Arctic With The Kronos Quartet

The Kronos Quartet.
Jay Blakesberg Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 11:14 am

Dogs barking, wind howling, ice crunching, then the sudden "ch-ch-ch-ch" of a sawing beat: That's composer Derek Charke's opening salvo in his transporting piece Cercle du Nord III.

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The Two-Way
10:00 am
Wed March 25, 2015

3 Americans Among Crash Victims Who Included Students, Opera Singers

Students mourn in front of their school in Haltern, Germany, on Wednesday, a day after the Germanwings plane crash. Sixteen high-schoolers and two teachers from the school were among the 150 people onboard the plane.
Martin Meissner AP

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 7:40 pm

We're learning more this morning about some of those people onboard Germanwings Flight 4U 9525 that crashed Tuesday with 150 people onboard. The passengers were from at least 15 countries, including the U.S.

Here is some of what we know about them.

An American And Her Daughter

The Americans on the flight were identified as Yvonne Selke and her daughter, Emily Selke, of Nokesville, Va.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
9:53 am
Wed March 25, 2015

Should You Trust That New Medical Study?

Alexander Raths iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 7:36 pm

News of medical studies fill the headlines and airwaves — often in blatant contradiction. We've all seen it: One week, coffee helps cure cancer; the next, it causes it.

From a consumer's perspective, the situation can be very confusing and potentially damaging — for example, in a case where someone with a serious illness believes and follows the wrong lead.

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All Songs Considered
9:45 am
Wed March 25, 2015

Son Lux: New Album, New Song

Son Lux (left to right): Ian Chang, Ryan Lott, Rafiq Bhatia
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 1:53 pm

Son Lux, the brain child of beat wizard Ryan Lott, is back as an official trio, with a new album and a new song. The album is called Bones and was co-written and recorded by Lott with drummer Ian Chang and guitarist Rafiq Bhatia.

The first single from the album, "Change Is Everything," is vintage Son Lux, with a startling mix of chopped up rhythms and sonic curiosities set against lyrics that are both grand and minimal.

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