World

Music Interviews
6:41 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

The Nearly Lost Story Of Cambodian Rock 'N' Roll

Cambodian band Baksei Cham Krong.
Mol Kamach Courtesy of Argot Pictures

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 9:25 pm

The tragic story of Cambodia in the '60s and '70s is well-known: It became engulfed in the Vietnam War, then more than a million Cambodians died under the Khmer Rouge regime. Doctors, lawyers, teachers — educated people — were targeted in the communist takeover. So were artists and singers.

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World
5:59 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Yemen Crisis Creates Even Tougher Challenge For U.S. In Middle East

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 7:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Where does Washington figure in all of this? Well, we're going to ask Nicholas Burns. He's professor of the practice of diplomacy and international politics at Harvard's Kennedy School. Welcome to the program once again.

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Parallels
5:59 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

9 Months Pregnant, An African Woman Risks It All And Heads To Europe

Chantel, 3, and Antoni, 7 months, migrated to Spain from their native Cameroon, with their mother Tatiana Kanga, 25. Tatiana was nine months pregnant with Antoni when they crossed the Mediterranean Sea together in an inflatable boat.
Lauren Frayer NPR

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 10:23 am

Tatiana Kanga was nine months pregnant and had her 3-year-old daughter in tow when she set out from her native Cameroon, headed for Spain.

Kanga's journey took her and her young daughter, Chantel, across the continent northward to Morocco. From there, they crossed the Mediterranean Sea in a rubber dinghy.

"It was an inflatable boat, with 17 people," Kanga explains. "Seven of them were women, three children — and six of the women were pregnant, including me."

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The Two-Way
5:57 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

New Orleans Bans Smoking In Bars, Restaurants

A sign outside The Red Door lounge last weekend warned about the impending smoking ban in New Orleans.
Gerald Herbert AP

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 6:55 pm

You can take your drinks outside on Bourbon Street, but you can no longer bring your smokes indoors.

Effective Wednesday, New Orleans has banned smoking in bars, restaurants and casinos.

The New York Times published an intriguing look at the city's nightlife spots as the ban went into effect.

Here's an excerpt:

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The Two-Way
5:54 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Court Throws Out Slugger Barry Bonds' Conviction

Former Major League Baseball player Barry Bonds. (March 21, 2011 file photo.)
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 6:06 pm

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Code Switch
5:34 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

A History Of Beef Between Black Writers, Artists, and Intellectuals

Dr. Michael Eric Dyson, left, escorts Dr. Cornel West across the stage during a symposium at Sharon Baptist Church, in Philadelphia, Pa, Saturday, Feb. 23, 2002.
Brian Branch-Price AP

Over the weekend, The New Republic posted a 10,000-word essay by black academic and author Michael Eric Dyson that's created quite a buzz within a certain segment of black America.

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The Two-Way
5:23 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

NFL Settlement Over Concussions Is Given Final Approval By Judge

A judge has given a final OK to an agreement that settles injury claims by former NFL players against the league.

The settlement, which pays medical and other benefits to players who suffered concussions and related injuries, could cost the NFL up to $1 billion over 65 years, the AP reports.

The wire service adds:

"The NFL expects 6,000 of nearly 20,000 retired players to suffer from Alzheimer's disease or moderate dementia someday. The settlement approved Wednesday by a federal judge in Philadelphia would pay them about $190,000 on average.

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Europe
4:31 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Migrants Fleeing Violence Dock At Sicilian Port Of Augusta

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 7:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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History
4:31 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Friday Marks Centennial Of Armenian Mass Killings During World War I

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 7:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Middle East
4:31 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Civilians Condemn Airstrikes For Creating Humanitarian Crisis In Yemen

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 7:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Back At Base
4:31 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

National Guard Members Face Challenges In Seeking Help For PTSD

Darryl Davidson, who served in Iraq with the National Guard, started having symptoms of PTSD 18 months after he left active duty. Getting treatment took several more months. Officials acknowledge guard members have less support than active forces.
Julysa Sosa for NPR

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 11:40 am

NPR — along with seven public radio stations around the country — is chronicling the lives of America's troops where they live. We're calling the project "Back at Base." This is the last of four reports this week about the National Guard.

It was December 2007 and Darryl Davidson was driving down a busy San Antonio street when something flew off the truck in front of him. He thinks it might have been a car battery, but he still isn't sure.

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Shots - Health News
4:08 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Why Do Mosquitoes Like To Bite You Best? It's In Your Genes

Mmm. Smells just like your identical twin.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 12:19 pm

A study that asked a few dozen pairs of twins to brave a swarm of hungry mosquitoes has revealed another clue to the cluster of reasons the insects are more attracted to some people than others: Genes matter.

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The Two-Way
4:03 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Acclaimed Australian Wellness Blogger Says She Made Up Cancer Claims

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 6:26 pm

Belle Gibson is an Australian blogger who said she cured her terminal brain cancer solely through diet and lifestyle, spawning a wellness empire, an award-winning app, a recipe book and a large online following. Trouble is, Gibson now says she made it all up.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:49 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

How The Met Opera's Chorus Master Gets 150 To Sound Like One

Donald Palumbo became the Met's chorus master in the 2007-2008 season. He sang in choruses all his life, he says, and eventually worked his way up without any formal conservatory training.
Marty Sohl Courtesy of the Met

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 11:05 am

Metropolitan Opera Chorus Master Donald Palumbo knows voices, and how to instruct singers to protect them.

Palumbo says that all singers have to monitor their voices while rehearsing during the day. The goal, he says, is to insure singers are at their "freshest" and "most solid" for the evening performance.

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Planet Money
3:36 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Episode 399: Can You Patent A Steak?

Joshua Marston

Tony Mata is a meat inventor. Obviously, he didn't invent meat; his job is figuring out new things to do with it.

Mata thinks he discovered a new steak—a novel way to cut up a chunk of beef that's currently not worth much. He's so excited about his discovery that he's trying to patent it.

Today on the show: can you patent a steak? We visit the workshop of Gene Gagliardi, the inventor of Steak-Umm and KFC's popcorn chicken. And we try to figure out what meat inventors tell us about patents and innovation.

More from Planet Money:

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Parallels
3:30 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Turks And Armenians Prepare For Dueling Anniversaries On Friday

Armenians lay flowers Tuesday at the Tsitsernakaberd Armenian Genocide Memorial in Yerevan, Armenia. Armenians on Friday will commemorate 100 years since 1.5 million of their kin were killed by Ottoman forces. Armenians and many historians call it the first genocide of the 20th century, but Turkey fiercely rejects that label.
Karen Minasyan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 3:16 pm

Armenians are preparing to mark on Friday the 100th anniversary of the killing of as many as 1.5 million of their ancestors by the Ottoman Empire. And Turks are getting ready to celebrate the centennial of a major military victory by the Ottoman forces over the Allied powers at Gallipoli in World War I.

Turkey traditionally holds the Gallipoli ceremonies on April 25, which falls on Saturday this year. But it is moving up the events by one day to Friday in what critics call a clumsy attempt to overshadow Armenian Remembrance Day.

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Goats and Soda
3:09 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

A Young Mother's Death Raises Questions Without Answers

The grave of the 27-year-old Indian woman who died on Monday from head and spinal injuries.
Wilbur Sargunaraj for NPR

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 9:15 am

On April 20, 2015, the body of a 27-year-old mother of two was laid to rest in a village in India. She had been admitted to the hospital ten days earlier, with bleeding in the head and a spinal injury that left her paralyzed. She told authorities she had slipped and fallen. NPR contributor Wilbur Sargunaraj had the opportunity to speak with three of her close friends, who said her husband caused her death. Family members would not comment.

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The Two-Way
3:07 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Transgender Teen Wins Case To Wear Makeup In DMV Photo

Chase Culpepper, 17, was told by DMV officials that she was not allowed to wear makeup in her license photo. The transgender teen sued the federal government for sex discrimination and violating her free speech rights.
Courtesy of Transgender Legal Defense & Education Fund

Transgender and gender-nonconforming individuals in South Carolina will now be allowed to take license photos that reflect their everyday appearance, following a settlement announced this morning in a lawsuit filed by a transgender teen.

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Parallels
3:04 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Of Fruit Hats And 'Happy Tropics,' A Renaissance For Carmen Miranda

During her lifetime, singer and dancer Carmen Miranda (shown here in a dressing room at the London Palladium in 1948) was a huge success in the United States, but rejected at home in Brazil as a sellout.
George Konig Keystone Features/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 7:59 pm

Known for her outrageous costumes and beautiful voice, Brazilian performer Carmen Miranda was the highest-earning woman in Hollywood in the 1940s.

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The Two-Way
2:55 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Google Announces Foray Into The Wireless Business

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 3:11 pm

Google announced on Wednesday that it is venturing into the wireless business by offering a service called "Project Fi."

Essentially, Google is using the Sprint and T-Mobile networks to provide wireless access to users of Google Nexus 6 phones.

That means that service will be limited, but the real news here is that Google is offering the service with a novel pricing scheme in which customers only pay for the data that they use.

Here's how Google explains it in a blog post:

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