World

Crime In The City
6:36 am
Mon July 21, 2014

Writer Plumbs 'Nature Of Evil' In Hometown's Violent Civil Rights Past

Black demonstrators run down a Natchez, Miss., street in 1967 after a report that several white youths with a gun were near. The town's civil rights past informs author Greg Iles' crime fiction.
AP

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 11:33 am

Mississippi's past looms large in Greg Iles' best-selling thrillers. His latest book, Natchez Burning, is the first in a trilogy that takes readers back 50 years to chilling civil rights-era murders and conspiracies all set in Iles' hometown — the antebellum river city of Natchez, Miss.

Iles' hero, Penn Cage, is a former prosecutor and widowed single father who has returned to his childhood home. Once there, he finds himself confronting killers, corruption and dark secrets.

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Business
6:06 am
Mon July 21, 2014

Arkansas Razorbacks Trademark Famous Hog Call

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 8:30 am

The famous hog call chanted by fans of the sports teams of the University of Arkansas Razorbacks is now a registered trademark owned by the school.

Business
6:06 am
Mon July 21, 2014

Report Of Expired Meat Sparks Food Safety Scare In China

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 8:30 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Strange News
6:06 am
Mon July 21, 2014

How Many Frequent Flyer Miles Can You Get With A $36M Charge?

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 8:30 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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World
5:27 am
Mon July 21, 2014

International Observers Work To Keep Tabs On Site Of Malaysia Jet Crash

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 8:30 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Secretary of State John Kerry spent a lot of time on TV yesterday, laying out what he says is extraordinary circumstantial evidence that rebels in Eastern Ukraine shot down the Malaysia Airlines jetliner. Kerry said on NBC's "Meet The Press" they did it with Russian help.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "MEET THE PRESS")

SECRETARY OF STATE JOHN KERRY: It is clear that Russia supports the separatists, supplies the separatists, encourages the separatists, trains the separatists and Russia needs to step up and make a difference here.

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NPR Story
5:27 am
Mon July 21, 2014

White House Faces Foreign Crises On Multiple Fronts

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 8:30 am

NPR's Cokie Roberts and Ari Shapiro, and Fiona Hill, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, discuss the shooting down of a passenger jet in Ukraine and the Israeli military invasion of Gaza.

Middle East
5:27 am
Mon July 21, 2014

After An Ultimatum, Christians Flee Iraqi City

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 8:30 am

For the first time since the first century, there are basically no Christians left in the historic Iraqi city of Mosul.

Business
5:27 am
Mon July 21, 2014

Tobacco Company Told To Pay $23.6B In Lawsuit

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 8:30 am

The R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. has been hit with a $23.6 billion ruling from a lawsuit brought by a chain smoker's widow.

Middle East
5:27 am
Mon July 21, 2014

Israelis Shaken Over Deaths Of Soldiers

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 8:30 am

In one Jerusalem suburb, some Israelis wonder whether the ground invasion will achieve the results they are looking for.

Middle East
5:27 am
Mon July 21, 2014

In Crowded Gaza, Civilians Have Few Places To Flee

A Palestinian carries a wounded girl in the emergency room of Shifa Hospital in Gaza City. The city's main hospital is filled with the wounded, and many others have taken refuge on the hospital grounds.
Lefteris Pitarakis AP

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 8:16 pm

As the Israeli military offensive grew unbearable in her Gaza City neighborhood, Um Rajab Helles fled to the city's main hospital Sunday with her husband and their 12 children even though no one was hurt.

"We didn't sleep all Saturday night," she said. "The kids were screaming and we were screaming. They kept running to the front door trying to leave, and we pulled them back. Around dawn a relative called and said what are you still doing there? We left at 6 a.m."

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First Listen
11:20 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

First Listen: Jenny Lewis, 'The Voyager'

Jenny Lewis' new album, The Voyager, comes out July 29.
Autumn de Wilde Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 11:31 am

"Nostalgia has no place for the woman traveling alone," the great travel writer Mary Morris once wrote. "Our motion is forward, whether by train or daydream." She's describing a necessary ruthlessness: Women are so often defined by their attachments (family, romance, even the fetishes of style) that becoming light enough to move often requires behavior others might read as cruel or, at best, distanced.

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First Listen
11:03 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

First Listen: Bear In Heaven, 'Time Is Over One Day Old'

Bear In Heaven's new album, Time Is Over One Day Old, comes out Aug. 5.
Dusdin Condren Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 11:39 am

Two minutes and 11 seconds into "They Dream," from Bear in Heaven's fourth album Time Is Over One Day Old, the music takes a strange turn. The band has been shuttling along at a riveting adventure-movie clip, with Jon Philpot's reverb-swaddled voice functioning as the primary distinct element in a sleek blur. Then, abruptly, the tempo stops. A wash of Space Mountain synths dissolves slowly — the set has been struck. When Philpot begins to sing again, he's the sole occupant of the spotlight.

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First Listen
11:03 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

First Listen: Shabazz Palaces, 'Lese Majesty'

Shabazz Palaces' new album, Lese Majesty, comes out July 29.
Patrick O'Brien-Smith Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 8:41 am

Broadcasting live from the land of legal weed and sliding into the frame like a giant Pacific octopus, here comes Lese Majesty, the third album from Seattle's Shabazz Palaces. It's definitely hip-hop, but... was that a drum? Human? Synthesizer? Sample of an old record? We may never know. MC and producer Ishmael Butler keeps his cards close.

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First Listen
11:03 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

First Listen: Wildest Dreams, 'Wildest Dreams'

Wildest Dreams' new, self-titled album comes out July 29.
Music By Marina Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 10:01 am

In a career spanning three decades, Harvey Bassett has done a bit of everything. He bashed drums in a John Peel-approved U.K. punk band in the late '70s, then found himself taken with hip-hop and turntables while visiting New York City in the early '80s.

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First Listen
11:03 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

First Listen: Quetzal, 'Quetzanimales'

Quetzal's new album, Quetzanimales, comes out July 29.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 2:10 pm

Twenty years is a long time in the life of a band. In the case of Quetzal, its two decades have been spent playing the soundtrack of its East L.A. neighborhoods: an evolving mash-up of Mexican son jarocho, low-rider oldies, cumbia, boleros, rock and blues.

Many Angelenos consider Quetzal as much as an institution as its East L.A. brethren in Los Lobos. Much of the current revival of son jarocho can be traced to Quetzal's history of playing the music when few others bothered.

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First Listen
11:01 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

First Listen: Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers, 'Hypnotic Eye'

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers' new album, Hypnotic Eye, comes out July 29.
Mary Ellen Matthews Courtesy of the artist

Even when he was in his late 20s, Tom Petty had a curmudgeonly edge to him, so it's no surprise that he's sneering about threats to the American dream in the opening moments of his new album, Hypnotic Eye. At 63, Petty is well into his transition to full-blown misanthropy, at times splitting the difference between Randy Newman and Bob Dylan.

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Weekends On All Things Considered Podcast
8:17 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

School Project Gets Attention; U.S. Group Aids Migrant Kids; Music From Jenny Lewis

Lauren Arrington's sixth-grade research project is cited in a science journal.
Courtesy of Lauren Arrington

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 6:17 pm

In this show, Lauren Arrington's sixth-grade lionfish project catches ecologists' attention, El Rescate in LA aids Central American migrants, and Jenny Lewis has an introspective new solo album.

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Around the Nation
7:00 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

Despite California's Drought, Taps Still Flowing In LA County

A sign over a highway in Glendale, Calif., warned motorists in February to save water in response to the state's severe drought. But a study released earlier this week showed residents in the southern coastal part of the state used more water this spring than they did last year.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 11:52 am

This January, after the driest calendar year in California history, Gov. Jerry Brown declared a drought emergency. He called on residents to reduce their water intake by 20 percent.

But downtown Los Angeles doesn't look like a city devastated by the state's worst drought in decades. The city is green with landscaping, and fountains are running. People still water their lawns, wash their cars and fill their pools.

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Middle East
5:31 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

Death Toll Climbs In Israel-Gaza Conflict Amid Attempts At Cease-Fire

Originally published on Sun July 20, 2014 8:09 pm

Israel widened its operation into Gaza Sunday and each side had the highest death toll of this two-week-old conflict. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks to Daniel Estrin in Jerusalem about this deadly day.

Latin America
5:31 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

Migrant Heads Home To Mexico — And Joins Fight Against Cartel

Reny Pineda was born in Michoacan, Mexico, but grew up in Los Angeles. In 2010 he returned to his homeland, and joined a vigilante battle against a ruthless cartel ruling the region. Now the Mexican government has ordered the civilian militias to disband, and Pineda picks lemons in this orchard.
Alan Ortega KQED

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 8:20 am

In the western Mexican state of Michoacan, civilian militias have challenged a powerful drug cartel known as the Knights Templar. The vigilante uprising, which spurred the Mexican government to send soldiers and police to help counter the cartel, was fueled by migrants who returned to Mexico after years living north of the border.

Reny Pineda, who was raised in Los Angeles, is one of those migrants. When he returned to his homeland in Mexico, he found a new life fighting drug lords.

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