World

The Two-Way
8:44 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Jobless Claims Rose Last Week

The scene at a job fair last fall in Van Nuys, Calif.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 1:18 pm

There were 326,000 first-time claims filed for unemployment insurance last week, up by 16,000 from the week before, the Employment and Training Administration reported Thursday morning.

Although the number increased, claims remained at the lower end of the range they've been in for the past year and were running at a pace close to where they were before the economy sank into its latest recession in December 2007.

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The Two-Way
8:16 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Top Stories: The Fort Hood Shooting

Good morning, here are our early stories:

-- Fort Hood Shooting: The Latest.

-- What Do We Know About The Fort Hood Gunman?

And here are more early headlines:

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The Two-Way
7:36 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Book News: Ted Cruz's Book Advance Said To Eclipse Sarah Palin's

News of Ted Cruz's book deal set off speculation that the Texas Republican may be planning to run for president in 2016.
Drew Angerer Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Thu April 3, 2014

'Empathy Exams' Is A Virtuosic Manifesto Of Human Pain

human heart diagram
iStockphoto

A boyfriend once called Leslie Jamison "a wound dweller." This is one of many personal morsels she shares in her virtuosic book of essays, The Empathy Exams, in which she intrepidly probes sore spots to explore how our reactions to both our own pain and that of others define us as human beings. Jamison notes with concern that ironic detachment has become the fallback in this "post-wounded" age that fears "anything too tender, too touchy-feely." The Empathy Exams presents a brainy but heartfelt case for compassion even at the risk of sentimentality.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Thu April 3, 2014

A Smart Spin On Alternate History In 'The Revolutions'

In his previous novels, Felix Gilman presented fantastic, mind-expanding visions of other worlds. His fifth, The Revolutions, sticks a little closer to home — at least at first. For a change, he's set a book in the real world, albeit a skewed version of it. Gilman reimagines late-19th-century London as a dark and dangerous place; along with all the political, technological, and cultural upheavals of the age, he's added an insidious dimension to the fashionable occultism that gripped the end of the Victorian Era.

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Business
7:03 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Women Defy Hollywood's Conventional Wisdom

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:53 am

A new study shows that films featuring prominent female characters profit more than those that don't.

All Songs Considered
7:03 am
Thu April 3, 2014

The Sole Of A Band, April 3

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 8:32 am

Baggy pants make different music than skinny jeans. Cowboy hats sound different than fedoras. T-shirt-and-jeans bands make a different noise than suit-and-tie bands. You can often look at a band's clothing and have a pretty good idea what it'll sound like.

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NPR Story
4:51 am
Thu April 3, 2014

ATF Works To Slow Flow Of U.S. Weapons Across Border

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:53 am

Most of the guns in Mexico come from north of the border. The U.S. has taken steps aimed at slowing gun smugglers, especially since the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives scandal.

NPR Story
4:51 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Democrats: Benghazi Probes Are Wasteful, Politically Motivated

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:53 am

Citing millions of dollars spent already, Democrats argue politics is not a good reason to spend millions more investigating the attack on the U.S. diplomatic outpost in Libya more than a year ago.

NPR Story
4:51 am
Thu April 3, 2014

To Broaden Appeal, Afghan Candidates Make Surprising Choices

Presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani waves to supporters during a campaign rally in Kabul on Tuesday. He is one of the three leading candidates in Saturday's presidential election.
Massoud Hossaini AP

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 3:55 pm

As Afghans prepare to choose a new president Saturday, it's hard not to notice a striking contradiction.

The three leading candidates are all urbane, Westernized men inclined to wear suits and ties in public. And yet, as they crisscross this impoverished, traditional country, they've all had to remake themselves to some degree, in their dress, their speech and even in the surprising choices they've made for vice presidential running mates, who range from notorious warlords to a woman.

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NPR Story
4:51 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Breakfast Waffle Wars Heat Up

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:53 am

Taco Bell last week announced its Waffle Taco. Not to be outdone, White Castle is adding Waffle Sandwiches to its breakfast line. Fast food breakfast is a $50 billion market.

NPR Story
4:51 am
Thu April 3, 2014

China Produces Plan To Boost Disappointing Economic Growth

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:53 am

China's new package is designed to keep the country on track to reach target growth rates of 7.5 percent for this year.

NPR Story
4:51 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Arabs In Israel Contemplate Borders Of Palestinian State

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:53 am

Mideast peace talks pushed by the U.S. could include a borderline that leaves some Arabs, who are in Israel as part of a minority of non-Jewish Israeli citizens, into a new Palestinian state.

Author Interviews
3:36 am
Thu April 3, 2014

A Song Of Frogs, Motherhood And Murder In Swampy San Francisco

Emma Donoghue's previous novel was Room.
Andrew Bainbridge

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:53 am

In her bestseller Room, writer Emma Donoghue imagined what life would be like for a little boy born into captivity, to a mother who'd been kidnapped and sexually assaulted.

And in her new novel, Frog Music, she's imagined a possible solution to a very real murder, one that took place in California in 1876.

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NPR Story
9:54 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Fort Hood Officials Report Mass Shooting On Base

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 11:26 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel in Washington.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block in Dallas. Late this afternoon there was a shooting at Fort Hood military base here in Texas. One person is confirmed dead and 14 injured. Fort Hood is in Killeen, Texas. It's about two and a half hours from where we are here in Dallas. And it was the scene of a shooting rampage back in 2009, in which 13 people were killed, another 30 injured.

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NPR Story
9:54 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Details Still Murky At Fort Hood — But Grim Memories Are Fresh

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 11:35 pm

At Fort Hood, the largest active-duty armored post in the U.S., Wednesday's shooting revives troubling memories of a similar incident five years ago. Tom Bowman reports the latest.

NPR Story
9:54 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Officials Identify Fort Hood Shooter: Ivan Lopez

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 11:34 pm

NPR's Tom Bowman reports that the shooter at Fort Hood has been identified as Ivan Lopez, a truck driver for the U.S. Army.

NPR Story
9:54 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

An Update At Fort Hood

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 11:27 pm

Early reports confirmed that one person is dead and 14 people are injured in the shooting at Fort Hood. The Army base was recently the scene of another shooting rampage in 2009. Tom Bowman explains.

NPR Story
9:54 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

President Obama On Shooting: 'We're Heartbroken'

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 11:33 pm

Journalist Kate McGee, of member station KUT in Austin, joins the program from Texas, delivering an update on the Fort Hood shooting and the responses — both from President Obama and Army officials.

The Two-Way
8:46 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

NASA Suspends Some Ties With Russia Over Ukraine Crisis

Russian personnel are the first to meet space station crew members when they return to earth.
Bill Ingalls NASA

NASA is suspending "the majority of its ongoing engagements" with its Russian counterpart over the crisis in Ukraine.

The Verge, which first broke the news based on a leaked memo, reports that "the suspension includes travel to Russia, teleconferences, and visits by Russian government officials to NASA facilities. NASA is even suspending the exchange of emails with Russian officials."

NASA confirmed the story in a statement late Wednesday.

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