World

All Tech Considered
5:49 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

A New Kind Of Sports Star: Gamers Make It To The Next Level

The studio audience watches a match between professional teams Dignitas (left) and Evil Geniuses (right) during the League of Legends North American Championship Series on Feb. 22.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 12:11 pm

The world of competitive online gaming hit a milestone last week when the prize pool for The International — a tournament for the game Dota 2 — reached more than $5 million, the largest in the history of e-sports.

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The Two-Way
5:39 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

AT&T To Acquire Broadcast Provider DirecTV

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 12:17 am

Telecommunications giant AT&T and DirecTV announced Sunday that the two companies had reached a definitive agreement which would see AT&T acquiring the broadcast service provider.

AT&T is buying DirecTV for about $48.5 billion, reports The New York Times. But the Times reports that the deal, including debt, is valued at about $67 billion.

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Africa
5:08 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

Nairobi Bombings Are A Sign Of Spreading Militant Influence

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 6:28 pm

A pair of bombs killed at least 10 people in Kenya's capital on Friday. What do these and a slew of other attacks in Kenya say about the security situation in the country and the region?

Global Health
5:00 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

How MERS Made The Leap From Animals To Humans

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 6:28 pm

David Quammen writes about how diseases jump from animals to people. He explains recent outbreaks of Middle East Respiratory Disease, or MERS, including three cases discovered in the U.S. this month.

Music Interviews
5:00 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

Six Decades Later, A Long-Lost Hank Williams Recording Resurfaces

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 1:35 pm

Transcript

TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

All right. If you're just joining us, it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Tess Vigeland.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVE RADIO BROADCAST)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: It's "The Garden Spot" Program presenting the songs of Hank Williams.

VIGELAND: Let's travel back for a few minutes to the year 1950.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

HANK WILLIAMS: (Singing) Hello, everybody, Garden Spot is on the air. So just relax and listen in your easy rocking chair.

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Humans
5:00 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

The First American Teenager, Millennia-Old And Underwater

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 6:28 pm

Transcript

TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

From the studios of NPR West in Culver City, California it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'M Tess Vigeland. Let us contemplate the American teenage girl, perhaps the very first one. Apparently, there's been some scientific debate about who she is and whether she hails from the same gene sequence as what we think of as the first Americans, American Indians. And when I say gene sequence, we're not talking about Skinnies from Urban Outfitters. NPR's science correspondent Joe Palca has the story of a very old American teenage identity crisis.

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My Big Break
5:00 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

A Big Break Realized Amid Fluorescent Lights and Slurpee Machines

Before his big break, Terry Boring worked as an assistant manager at a convenience store in Pittsburgh.
Jessica Ferringer Courtesy of Terry Boring

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 12:44 pm

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

It all started with a dead-end job at a convenience store in Pittsburgh. Terry Boring says he had the worst job there: the assistant manager.

"You get none of the respect of the store manager and you get all of the terrible hours that they can't get anyone else to work," he says.

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Asia
5:00 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

In Sea Change Election, Young India Ushers In A New Political Era

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 6:28 pm

Transcript

TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Tess Vigeland in for Arun Rath. This week, Narendra Modi and his BJP party won India's general election in a landslide. Modi's historic victory upends years of political domination by the Gandhi family, which has been a ruling power since India's independence. NPR's Julie McCarthy is in New Delhi, and I asked her what Modi's election says about the kind of country India is now?

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Movie Interviews
4:37 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

What's In A Roar? Crafting Godzilla's Iconic Sound

Godzilla's original 1954 roar was created by composer Akira Ifukube, who dragged a resin-coated leather glove along the loosened strings of a double bass.
Toho

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:47 am

Godzilla roared to No. 1 at the box office on opening weekend. The latest reboot of the sci-fi blockbuster brings a new take on the monster's iconic roar to the silver screen.

Ethan Van der Ryn and Erik Aadahl designed the sound for the new movie.

"I think that the Godzilla roar probably tops the King Kong roar in terms of iconic-ness," Van der Ryn says.

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The Two-Way
3:39 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

Worst Floods In A Century Kill At Least 24 In The Balkans

Volunteers use a rubber boat to evacuate residents from a flooded area in Obrenovac, some 18 miles southwest of Belgrade, Serbia on Sunday.
Darko Vojinovic AP

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 2:41 am

Post Updated: 2:30 a.m. ET Monday:

The unrelenting rain in the Balkans has caused the worst flooding since records began being kept. According to The Associated Press: The rain caused an estimated 2,100 landslides on Sunday that covered roads, homes and whole villages throughout hilly Bosnia. Another 1,000 landslides were reported in neighboring Serbia.

Thousands of people in the region have been forced from their homes. In some locations, flood waters receded on Sunday.

Original Post:

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The Two-Way
3:12 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

A Giant Among Dinosaurs, Discovered In Argentina

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:28 am

Paleontologists in Argentina say they have unearthed the fossils of the biggest dinosaur ever to walk the planet.

The bones are believed to be from a new species of the aptly named titanosaur, a massive herbivore from the late Cretaceous period, officials from the Museo Paleontologico Egidio Feruglio told BBC News.

The titanosaur was a sauropod, like the apatosaurus or brachiosaurus, that roamed the forests of Patagonia 95 million years ago.

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The Two-Way
1:58 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

'The Play Of The Game': Watch A Boy Win Over A Girl With A Foul Ball

A boy hands a girl a foul ball and she smiles broadly.
MLB

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 9:31 am

The game announcers called it "the play of the game." We'd be foolish not to agree.

During last night's Blue Jays-Rangers game, a boy catches a foul ball. Without a thought, he turns around and gives the ball to a much older girl, who flashes a major smile.

You're thinking, wow, what a smooth operator. But the replay reveals the kid is slicker than you imagined. Just watch:

h/t: Deadspin.

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Religion
1:22 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

Nigerian Church Spreads African-Style Zeal Across North America

Members of the Redeemed Christian Church of God pray at Redemption Camp in Floyd, Texas, in 2009. The church is on a mission to spread to every city in North America.
Jessica Rinaldi Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 1:50 pm

In earlier times, white missionaries traveled from Europe and America to sub-Saharan Africa to save souls.

Today, the trend has reversed. Evangelists from the global south are targeting Americans and Europeans they say are ripe for Christian renewal.

There is no greater example than the Redeemed Christian Church of God. This ambitious Nigerian denomination has established its North American headquarters in Texas, and its goal is nothing less than becoming the next major global religion.

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Middle East
12:55 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

Unity Is A Difficult Mission For Christians In Israel

Arab-Israeli children ride in a float during an annual march for Virgin Mary in the northern Israeli city of Haifa on May 11. Arab Christians don't mix much with migrant or Russian Christians.
Ahmad Gharibli AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 1:58 pm

Pope Francis visits the Mideast next week, including Israel, where Christians make up just 2 percent of the population.

But since the last papal visit to the Holy Land five years ago, the number of Christians in Israel has increased, and the makeup of the Christian population has continued to shift.

The vast majority of Israeli Christians have always been Arab and they still make up three-quarters of the 160,000 Christians living in Israel. But tens of thousands of Christians have come to Israel from Asia and Africa — both legal workers and undocumented migrants.

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Code Switch
12:24 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

The American Story, As It Was Reported To The Rest Of The Nation

A display of America's first ethnic newspapers at the Newseum's new exhibit, "One Nation With News For All." The exhibit opened on May 16 and runs through Jan. 5, 2015.
Jonathan Thompson/Newseum

The first draft of American history has many authors.

And they include journalists from ethnic media: newspapers, websites, radio and TV stations dedicated to reporting news for immigrant and ethnic communities.

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The Two-Way
11:16 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Swiss Voters Reject Hiking Minimum Wage To World's Highest Level

A man casts his ballot on Sunday in Bulle, western Switzerland, during a referendum.
Fabrice Coffrini AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 3:05 pm

Swiss voters resoundingly rejected a measure that would have hiked the country's minimum wage to the highest level in the world.

If approved, the referendum would have raised the national minimum wage to $25 an hour. Bloomberg reports that 76.3 percent of voters no on the measure.

The AP reports:

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Interviews
10:30 am
Sun May 18, 2014

A First Black Professor Remembers Her Segregated Education

Hortense McClinton graduated from Howard University in Washington, D.C., in the 1930s and became the first black professor at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill.
Courtesy of Howard University

Originally published on Sat May 24, 2014 4:25 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Hortense McClinton has lived with a remarkable sense of determination — for 95 years.

Her father's parents were slaves, and McClinton grew up in a completely segregated society, the all-black town of Boley, Okla.

"I didn't realize how segregated everything was," she tells NPR's Lynn Neary. That changed after a visit with her uncle in Guthrie, Okla.

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The Two-Way
10:28 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Reports: Syrian Air Defense Chief Killed In Rebel Attack

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 3:04 pm

The chief of Syria's air defense has been killed during an attack by rebel fighters on Sunday, news outlets, including The Associated Press and The Guardian, are reporting.

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Sunday Puzzle
9:13 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Finding The Answers Within

NPR

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 11:24 am

Spoiler Alert: The answers for today's on-air challenge are given below. Read no further if you're playing along with the audio.

On-air challenge: The on-air puzzle this week consists of some of the runner-up entries from our two-week creative challenge. Every answer has six or more letters.

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Business
9:13 am
Sun May 18, 2014

New Initiative Aims To Encourage Diversity In Kids' Publishing

First Book CEO Kyle Zimmer says her data shows children read more enthusiastically when they see themselves reflected in their books.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 11:24 am

The lack of diversity in children's literature is nothing new – it's an issue that's been roiling the book world for years. Just in the past few weeks, it's come to a head with the We Need Diverse Books campaign on Twitter and Tumblr. Everyone agrees: all kinds of kids need to be able to see themselves reflected in the books they read.

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