World

Middle East
5:20 am
Tue May 13, 2014

Syrian Opposition Leader To Meet With White House Official

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 9:58 am

Key Syrian opposition leader Ahmed al-Jarba is expected at the White House on Tuesday to meet with National Security Advisor Susan Rice. The Syrian civil war has been raging for more than three years.

Middle East
5:20 am
Tue May 13, 2014

White Westeners At Risk In Yemen

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 10:11 am

A series of violent incidents have recently taken place in and around the Yemeni capital Sana'a. Steve Inskeep talks to Iona Craig, who writes for The Times of London.

Afghanistan
5:20 am
Tue May 13, 2014

Former Army Sgt. Kyle White To Receive Medal Of Honor

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 7:30 am

Renee Montagne talks to Kyle White, who will receive the Medal of Honor for actions conducted during a 2007 battle in Afghanistan. He was with U.S. and Afghan forces when the Taliban ambushed them.

NPR Story
5:20 am
Tue May 13, 2014

Uruguay's President Shuns Trappings Of His Office

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 9:25 am

The president of Uruguay is said to be extremely frugal and gives most of his salary to charity. Renee Montagne talks to Simon Romero of The New York Times about Jose Mujica's presidency.

NPR Story
5:20 am
Tue May 13, 2014

Dracula's Transylvania Castle Goes On The Market

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 7:30 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Appropriate music for today's last word in business: real estate.

Dracula's castle is for sale in the central Romanian region of Transylvania.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Think of it as a fang-tastic deal. You could be - go ahead, laugh.

INSKEEP: Yeah, I am.

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NPR Story
5:20 am
Tue May 13, 2014

Facebook Looking To Open A Sales Office In Beijing

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 7:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with Facebook liking China.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: Bloomberg news reports that Facebook could open a sales office in Beijing from within a year. This, even though it was banned in China five years ago. A new office would service Chinese businesses wanting to advertise internationally.

Research News
5:20 am
Tue May 13, 2014

More Parental Attention May Give First-Born Kids Advantages

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 10:00 am

Firstborn kids often do better in school and, on average, go on to earn more money than their younger siblings. A new theory tries to explain why.

Parallels
3:07 am
Tue May 13, 2014

Poverty Among Holocaust Survivors Hits A Nerve In Israel

An Israeli places a flower beside the name of the World War II Nazi concentration camp Bergen-Belsen during a ceremony marking Holocaust Remembrance Day at Yad Vashem in Jerusalem, on April 28. The Israeli government is weighing a new plan that would get more financial help to elderly Holocaust survivors, including about 50,000 in the country who are living below the poverty line.
Ammar Awad Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 11:37 am

Yulia Feuerman stays dry-eyed while retelling many of her experiences during World War II.

When she was 10, Feuerman was separated from her mother and two sisters by Nazi soldiers in their small town in what is now western Ukraine. They were sent to a concentration camp. Feuerman, her father and two remaining siblings went into hiding with other Jews — but were eventually found by the Germans. Her father and brother were shot and killed. A Christian family took Feuerman in, pretending she was their daughter to protect her.

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Parallels
3:06 am
Tue May 13, 2014

The Global Economy: A World Of Acronyms

Shoppers gaze at a jewelry store display window in the Turkish capital Ankara on Feb. 19. Some economists have coined the term MINT to include the up-and-coming emerging markets of Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey. But Turkey has been hit by street protests, and others in the group have had their share of recent turbulence.
Adem Altan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 11:42 am

The world of finance gave birth in 2001 to a new buzzword: BRIC. The word is an acronym for Brazil, Russia, India and China. Jim O'Neill, an economist with Goldman Sachs who's been credited with coining the term, saw those four countries as turbo-charged engines among emerging markets, ones that would give Western economies a run for their money.

O'Neill says when he dreamed up the acronym 13 years ago, people didn't really focus on the potential importance of some of these countries.

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Parallels
3:05 am
Tue May 13, 2014

The French Ask: Should We Be Building Warships For Russia?

The Vladivostok warship, a Mistral class LHD amphibious vessel ordered by Russia, at the STX France shipyard in Saint-Nazaire, France, on Friday. The Vladivostok is one of two ships Russia ordered from France.
Jean-Sebastien Evrard AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 9:57 am

French President Francois Hollande says that for now, France intends to go through with a deal to build two warships for the Russian navy. The first of the Mistral-class assault vessels is supposed to be delivered in October.

The $1.6 billion deal is the biggest sale to Russia ever by a NATO country. And three years ago, when the contract was signed, French officials hailed it as a sign that Moscow should be considered a partner, not an enemy. Still, there were critics among NATO allies even then.

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The Salt
3:02 am
Tue May 13, 2014

Turnspit Dogs: The Rise And Fall Of The Vernepator Cur

A turnspit dog at work in a wooden cooking wheel in an inn at Newcastle, Carmarthen, Wales, in 1869.
Ann Ronan Pictures/Print Collector/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 6:45 pm

In an old hunting lodge on the grounds of an ancient Norman castle in Abergavenny, Wales, a small, extinct dog peers out of a handmade wooden display case.

"Whiskey is the last surviving specimen of a turnspit dog, albeit stuffed," says Sally Davis, longtime custodian at the Abergavenny Museum.

The Canis vertigus, or turnspit, was an essential part of every large kitchen in Britain in the 16th century. The small cooking canine was bred to run in a wheel that turned a roasting spit in cavernous kitchen fireplaces.

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Music Interviews
2:03 am
Tue May 13, 2014

'Bound To Sound Different': The Black Keys On Going Big

Since forming The Black Keys in 2001, Patrick Carney (left) and Dan Auerbach have evolved from a scrappy home-recording aesthetic into something grander.
Danny Clinch Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 11:58 am

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Code Switch
7:39 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

Donald Sterling Says He Isn't A Racist. Is Anyone?

Donald Sterling, the owner of the NBA's Los Angeles Clippers, might be forced by the league's owners to sell his franchise.
Mark J. Terrill ASSOCIATED PRESS

Last week, I was having a conversation with a woman who said that her father was distrustful of people of other races. When I asked her if she considered her father a racist, she balked at the premise of the question. When I think of a racist, I think of the worst kind of person, she said. And anyway, she said, her father didn't like anybody.

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It's All Politics
6:19 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

Keith Crisco, Congressional Opponent Of Clay Aiken, Dies

Keith Crisco, a North Carolina textile entrepreneur who went up against former American Idol singer Clay Aiken in a Democratic primary, died in an accident at home on Monday.
Uncredited AP

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 10:13 am

A week after apparently losing his nomination bid for Congress, Keith Crisco has died.

Despite extensive experience in business and government, Crisco is fated to be best known as the person who finished behind former American Idol star Clay Aiken in a Democratic primary in North Carolina last Tuesday.

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Around the Nation
6:03 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

Tale Of Two Billboards: An Ozark Town's Struggle To Unseat Hate

Several white supremacist groups have roots near Harrison, Ark. Residents believe a yellow billboard in town is a reaction to a local effort to make the town more inclusive.
Frank Morris KCUR

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 7:58 pm

Second in a two-part report.

The Ozark region, covering most of southern Missouri and northern Arkansas, has long been a haven for white supremacists. The area is home to the neo-Nazi accused of killing three people at Jewish centers near Kansas City, Kan., in April.

The region continues to grapple with a culture that has historically turned a blind eye to bigotry. That fight is particularly concentrated in Harrison, Ark.

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The Two-Way
5:19 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

Melting Of Antarctic Ice Sheet Might Be Unstoppable

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 6:31 pm

Scientists have long worried about climate change-induced melting of the huge West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Now they say that not only is the disintegration of the ice already underway, but that it's likely unstoppable.

That means that in the coming centuries, global sea levels will rise by anywhere from 4 to 12 feet. As NPR's Nell Greenfieldboyce reports, that's a larger increase than the United Nations expert panel noted last year. But it would occur over a longer time frame — centuries instead of decades.

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The Two-Way
5:09 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

Re-Enactment Of Satanic Mass Planned At Harvard Causes Uproar

Harvard University's main campus in Cambridge, Mass.
Darren McCollester Getty Images

Harvard University Extension School's Cultural Studies Club has ignited a maelstrom of criticism over its plans to reenact a black mass on Monday.

The university and the Catholic Church have condemned it, but the club says the Satanic mass is simply for educational purposes.

The AP reports:

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Shots - Health News
5:02 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

Overused Medical Services Cost Medicare Billions Of Dollars

Medical overtreatment is the inverse of former Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart's definition of pornography: While waste is easy to define in principle, it can be hard to know it when you see it.

A treatment that is appropriate for one patient can also be unnecessary or even counterproductive for another, depending on the patient's condition. This has been a major obstacle for studies seeking to pinpoint overused services, which by the most expansive estimates may account for as much as a third of the nation's health spending.

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World Cafe
4:48 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

World Cafe Next: Pattern Is Movement

Pattern Is Movement.
Courtesy of the artist

Time to embrace the Philadelphia band Pattern is Movement as our World Cafe: Next artist this week. Over the course of five albums, the band has evolved into a two-piece with Andrew Thibodeaux and Chris Ward. There are beautiful, almost baroque aspects of this largely electronic and percussive music on the duo's new self-titled album. We encourage you to download our World Cafe: Next podcast with a couple of songs.

All Tech Considered
4:38 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

As Drones Fly In Cities And Yards, So Do The Complaints

Merrill uses a drone to take aerial shots of Santa Cruz, Calif.
Courtesy of David Merrill

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 10:25 am

The price of drones is dropping — a decent one could cost you $300 — but the reality of the devices flying around cities and neighborhoods doesn't sit well with a lot of Americans.

Are they just paranoid?

Three months ago, when Michael Kirschner and his wife purchased a new condo in San Francisco, they were not concerned about drones. They fell in love with the unit because of its big picture windows.

"You have a view that reaches all the way out to the Golden Gate Bridge," Kirschner says.

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