World

The Two-Way
3:21 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Senior Prank Gone Wild: Police Arrest 62 N.J. Students

A Bergen County, N.J., police officer (right) walks with a police dog into Teaneck High School, where 62 students were arrested during an overnight break-in on Thursday in Teaneck.
Julio Cortez AP

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 8:31 pm

We're pretty sure they've all realized what a horrible idea this turned out to be: Sixty-two students in Teaneck, N.J., were arrested after a senior prank went too far.

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Mountain Stage
3:15 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Eilen Jewell On Mountain Stage

Eilen Jewell.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 4:29 pm

Eilen Jewell makes her second appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live on the campus of West Virginia University in Morgantown.

The self-proclaimed Queen of the Minor Key, Jewell has a sweet voice and easygoing delivery that have won her fans from her native rural Idaho to Boston, where she's now based. Her music encompasses a wide range of musical styles, from folk, country and gospel leanings to electric outings that skirt the edge of '60s garage rock and Chicago blues.

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The Salt
3:10 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Here's The Scoop On Jackfruit, A Ginormous Fruit To Feed The World

Jackfruits grow on the branches and trunks of tall trees. You don't wait to harvest until they drop of their own accord — by that time, they'd be overripe.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 10:31 am

It's not every fruit that gets its own international symposium.

Then again, the jackfruit is not your typical fruit. It's got a distinctive, musky smell, and a flavor that some describe as like Juicy Fruit gum.

It is the largest tree fruit in the world, capable of reaching 100 pounds. And it grows on the branches — and the trunks — of trees that can reach 30, 40, 50 feet. (Trunk-growing is a good thing because it reduces the odds of a jackfruit bopping you on the head.)

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A Blog Supreme
3:08 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Remembering Armando Peraza, An Afro-Cuban Percussion Giant

It's hard to imagine a musical career that included musicians as varied as Charlie Parker, Peggy Lee, George Shearing and Carlos Santana. But such was hand percussionist Armando Peraza's resumé after almost 70 years making music.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:43 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

10 Can't-Miss Classical Music Festivals

Some performances during the Bard Music Festival in the Hudson Valley take place at the Fisher Center, designed by Frank Gehry.
Peter Aaron/Esto

Originally published on Fri May 2, 2014 9:32 am

  • Stravinsky: Firebird - 'Infernal Dance' (from the 2013 Aspen Music Festival)

In much of the country it still feels like summer is a long way off, but it's not too early to plan on hitting the road and hearing great music. From bucolic college campuses in New England to musical rafting trips down the Colorado, these are 10 of the most intriguing classical festivals. And below them is a listing, by region, of many of the best fests. Been to one we missed? Pass along your own advice in the comments section or via Facebook or Twitter.

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The Two-Way
2:29 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

What To Do With A Whale Carcass? Question Looms Large In Small Town

A blue whale carcass washed up last week in Trout River, Newfoundland, Canada.
Don Bradshaw Courtesy of Don Bradshaw/NTV News

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 6:11 pm

This post was updated at 5:18 p.m.

Trout River, Newfoundland: Population: 600, 1 rotting whale carcass.

The blue whale appeared on the town's shores a week ago, one of two that have washed up recently in western Newfoundland. They are thought to have been part of a group of blue whales that got trapped in shifting ice and died.

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NPR Story
2:29 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Kentucky Derby's Signature Drink Uses Locally Grown Mint

Dohn & Dohn Gardens, a small family farm in Jefferson County, Ky., grows all the mint used in the mint juleps served at the Kentucky Derby. (Alix Mattingly/WFPL News)

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 3:19 pm

The race isn’t until Saturday, but Kentucky Derby parties get underway today at Churchill Downs, and that means plenty of the event’s signature drink: the mint julep.

More than 120,000 mint juleps will be devoured, requiring lots of water, sugar, 10,000 bottles of bourbon, and 1,000 pounds of mint — all grown on a small family farm in southern Jefferson County.

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NPR Story
2:29 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Burger King's Subservient Chicken Is Back

In 2004, Burger King had a hit with its interactive "Subservient Chicken" ad campaign for the TenderCrisp Chicken Sandwich. As the fast food giant introduces its new Chicken Big King Sandwich, it's brought back the famous ad character -- but he's no longer subservient. (Courtesy of YouTube)

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 3:19 pm

[Youtube]

After a 10-year hiatus, Burger King is bringing its Subservient Chicken ad campaign back.

The fast food chain struck advertisement gold when they introduced the Subservient Chicken character, a man dressed in a chicken costume who was featured in commercials and an interactive website. 

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NPR Story
2:29 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Solving The Mystery Of A Black Activist's Disappearance

Tamara Kamara, Robinson's youngest child, and widow, Cheryl Buswell-Robinson. (Sarah Hulett/Michigan Radio)

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 3:19 pm

In the spring of 1973, Ray Robinson left his wife and three young children in Bogue Chitto, Alabama to support the occupation of Wounded Knee, South Dakota.

He never came home.

Now, more than 40 years after his disappearance, his widow and grown daughters, who live in Detroit, are closer to knowing what happened. Newly released FBI documents say Robinson was killed there, and suggest members of the American Indian Movement covered up the crime.

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NPR Story
2:29 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

What's Healthy And What's Not At Italian Chain Restaurants

The Olive Garden's chicken alfredo is 1,440 calories and two and a half days' saturated fat (48 grams) -- about what you'd get in two 14-ounce New York Strip steaks at Outback Steakhouse, according to the Center for Science in the Public Interest. (olivegarden.com)

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 3:19 pm

When you eat out, you might think you are making a healthy choice by ordering vegetarian ravioli over that fillet mignon. However, according to the Center for Science in the Public Interest, you may be wrong.

The nonprofit health advocacy group releases its rankings today of the most healthful — and the most appalling — choices at popular Italian-American restaurant chains, including Olive Garden, Carrabba’s Italian Grill, Romano’s Macaroni Grill, and Maggiano’s.

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NPR Story
2:29 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

TMZ: A Credible Source For Breaking News?

Screenshot of TMZ's release of Donald Sterling audio.

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 3:19 pm

Last week, the celebrity gossip and entertainment news website TMZ released audio of Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling making racist and incendiary remarks in a phone conversation with his girlfriend.

Since the audio went public, the story has gained mass media attention, resulting in the NBA commissioner issuing Sterling a lifetime ban from the NBA and a fine of $2.5 million.

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NPR Story
2:29 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Is The Fed Meeting Its Dual Mandate On The Economy?

The Eccles Building in Washington, D.C., serves as the Federal Reserve System's headquarters. (Wikimedia Commons)

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 3:19 pm

Yesterday’s report showing U.S. economic growth essentially stalled in the first quarter has renewed the debate over the Federal Reserve’s policies.

The Fed has two basic mandates: keeping inflation low and maximizing employment. In its policy statement yesterday, the central banking system said it would stay the course, keeping short-term interest rates low, but also continuing to pull back on its bond purchasing program by another $10 billion.

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All Songs TV
2:15 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Air Review, 'Young'

Air Review from their video for 'Young'
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 4:01 pm

Air Review, from Dallas, mixes cheery music with fantastical imagery in the video for "Young," a surreal adventure in storytelling that travels through cityscapes, landscapes outer space.

From Scratch
2:14 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Fadi Ghandour, Founder Of Aramex

Host Jessica Harris speaks with Fadi Ghandour, the founder of Aramex, a company that has been referred to as the Fedex of the Middle East.

Harris also speaks with Peter Manning, the founder of Peter Manning/Five Eight New York.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
1:22 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

It's International Workers' Day (But Not In The U.S.)

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 3:19 pm

May 1st is International Workers Day, also known as May Day. Here & Now’s Sacha Pfeiffer and Jeremy Hobson take a look at this holiday — and why it’s not celebrated in the U.S. — with Tom Juravich of the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

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NPR Story
1:22 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Navy SEALs Team Up With Young Cancer Patients

Through the One Summit program, Navy SEALs spend the day indoor rock climbing with children with cancer. Pictured here, former SEAL Pat Dossett works with 12-year-old Loukas Tatasciore at a recent event in Watertown. (Fred Thys/WBUR)

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 3:19 pm

Children who are patients at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston are offered all kinds of outings meant to boost their morale.

Now, the elite research hospital is teaming up with the military elite — Navy SEALs — to provide children with motivation to endure their often difficult treatments.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Fred Thys of WBUR reports.

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NPR Story
1:22 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Should Sterling Be Forced To Sell The Clippers?

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 3:19 pm

After those racists comments made by Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling were confirmed, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver banned him from the league for life, fined him $2.5 million and said the other owners would force him to sell the team.

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NPR Story
1:22 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Is This It For Toronto Mayor Rob Ford?

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 3:19 pm

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford has admitted he has a drinking problem and will take a leave of absence, according to his lawyer. The announcement comes after reports of a new video of the mayor smoking what appeared to be crack cocaine.

Ford has been in the middle of a controversy since police reported last year that they had a video that appeared to show him smoking crack. Ford later admitted he had smoked crack when he was in a “drunken stupor.”

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NPR Story
1:22 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Huge New Syrian Refugee Camp Opening In Jordan

A picture taken on April 30, 2014 in Azraq, in the Jordanian eastern desert, shows houses, some under construction, at a refugee camp for Syrians fleeing the war in their country. The 5.7-square-mile camp can accommodate up to 50,000 people but the U.N. says it can be expanded to take in 130,000, making it one of the biggest in the world. (Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 3:19 pm

The United Nations says nearly 3 million people have fled the fighting in Syria; 600,000 of them are in neighboring Jordan, where a new refugee camp is opening. The BBC’s Yolande Knell visited and has this report.

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The Two-Way
12:23 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Longtime 'Mad' Magazine Editor Dies At 88

Editor Al Feldstein works on page layouts in his office at Mad magazine's New York headquarters in 1972. A poster with the iconic character Alfred E. Neuman hangs on the wall behind him.
Jerry Mosey AP

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 2:40 pm

Al Feldstein, the man who turned Mad magazine into a must-read for teens of the baby boomer generation, has died at his home near Livingston, Mont. He was 88.

Feldstein, who died Tuesday, was editor of Mad for nearly 30 years until the mid-'80s, taking the magazine to a mass audience with its blend of political and cultural satire tuned to adolescent sensibilities.

Among other things, he turned the freckle-faced, gap-toothed and jug-eared Alfred E. Neuman character, with the "What, Me Worry?" catchphrase, into a staple of the magazine.

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