World

Author Interviews
3:34 pm
Sat October 12, 2013

The Surprising Story Of 'Thomas Jefferson's Qur'an'

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 2:53 pm

Thomas Jefferson had a vast personal library reflecting his enormous curiosity about the world. Among his volumes: a Quran purchased in 1765 that informed his ideas about plurality and religious freedom in the founding of America.

In her book Thomas Jefferson's Qur'an: Islam and the Founders, author Denise Spellberg draws parallels between the beliefs of the founding father and religious tolerance in the United States today.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:51 pm
Sat October 12, 2013

Crime Ring That Used Kids In Robberies Gets Jail Time In France

Adults who ordered children to commit dozens of robberies have been sentenced to jail terms in France, after a court found members of three Croatian Roma families guilty of using the kids to carry out the crimes.

The court convicted 26 members of three families for the crimes, handing down sentences of between two and eight years in prison.

From the Agence France-Presse:

Read more
The Protojournalist
11:21 am
Sat October 12, 2013

The True Meaning Of The National Mall

A demonstrator glides past the Washington Monument, as prelude to the World Naked Bike Ride on June 9, 2007.
SAUL LOEB AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 11:10 am

On the National Mall: Though monuments and museums along the greenway are closed due to the federal shutdown, veterans are planning to march on Sunday and activists gathered last week to draw attention to immigration reform. On Oct.

Read more
Fresh Air Weekend
9:03 am
Sat October 12, 2013

Fresh Air Weekend: Tom Hanks, Ben Franklin's Sister, Daniel Radcliffe

Daniel Radcliffe tells Fresh Air that his parents were initially hesitant about letting him play Harry Potter.
Warwick Saint

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 11:51 am

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Read more
The Two-Way
8:41 am
Sat October 12, 2013

Cyclone Phailin Hits India With 120 MPH Winds; Thousands Flee

A man covers himself with a plastic sheet as a shield as he walks to a safer place near Gopalpur in eastern India Saturday. Hundreds of thousands of people living along India's eastern coastline took shelter from the massive powerful cyclone Phailin.
Biswaranjan Rout AP

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 3:35 pm

Cyclone Phailin has struck India's east coast in the Bay of Bengal, where more than 500,000 people have evacuated from vulnerable areas along the coast. Phailin reportedly packed sustained winds of more than 120 mph when the eye of the storm hit; strong winds will likely persist for hours to come.

Update at 3:15 p.m. ET:

Read more
Politics
7:36 am
Sat October 12, 2013

Some In Congress Have Behaved Badly From The Start

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 9:59 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The shutdown of the U.S. government has sparked lots of finger-pointing and name calling in Congress. But our friend A.J. Jacobs says this is hardly the nastiest dispute in the history of our democracy. A.J., an editor-at-large at Esquire Magazine - until they come to their senses - joins us now from New York. A.J., thanks so much for being with us.

A.J. JACOBS: Thank you for having me.

Read more
Politics
7:36 am
Sat October 12, 2013

D.C. Tourists Shell Out Admission Fees Amid Shutdown

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 8:05 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The government shutdown is now entering its second week. That's left many lawmakers with little to do and many tourists in Washington, D.C. wandering wanly through the streets of the city, wondering how to spend their pre-planned vacations. NPR's Alan Yu checks in with some of them.

Read more
Asia
7:36 am
Sat October 12, 2013

'This Chap Has Been A Colossus': Indian Cricket Star To Retire

Students hold a poster of Indian cricketer Sachin Tendulkar in March at school in Chennai, southern India.
AP

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 3:31 pm

Sachin Tendulkar is not only perhaps the best batsman to ever play cricket, he is considered an icon. Thursday, he announced his plan to retire.

It's almost impossible to find an American sports analogy for how huge Tendulkar is in India, where interest in cricket tends toward obsessive, says Indian Parliament member Shashi Tharoor.

"He is certainly the greatest Indian to ever wield a cricket bat, and possibly one of the greatest in the history of the entire sport worldwide," Tharoor explains to Weekend Edition host Scott Simon.

Read more
All Tech Considered
7:36 am
Sat October 12, 2013

Red Cross Wants Video Games To Get Real On War Crimes

A gamer plays a war game at the Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles in June. The ICRC wants war games to spread understanding of the rules of armed conflict.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 9:46 am

There aren't universal laws of war when it comes to video games. Players can disregard the rules of the Geneva Convention without encountering any consequences. The International Committee of the Red Cross wants to change that.

ICRC spokesman Bernard Barrett says that for the past two years, a special unit of the Red Cross has been working with video game producers to help them simulate real-world sanctions for virtual war crimes.

Read more
It's All Politics
6:01 am
Sat October 12, 2013

Would The U.S. Be Better Off With A Parliament?

A view of the German Bundestag, or federal Parliament, in Berlin.
Michael Sohn AP

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 3:31 pm

There are many reasons for the gridlock in Washington. Some are recent developments, as the U.S. becomes more politically polarized. Others are structural, built into the American political system.

Regardless, the extreme paralysis that has recently become the norm in D.C. almost never happens in Western European democracies.

"You're asking: Do other democracies have this problem? And the answer is: Not many," says Jane Mansbridge, a professor at the Harvard Kennedy School.

Read more
Asia
5:58 am
Sat October 12, 2013

Powerful Cyclone Barrels Toward India's East Coast

Villagers braving strong winds and rain reach for a cyclone center in Ganjam district, near the Indian city of Bhubaneswar.
Biswaranjan Rout AP

Strong winds and heavy rains pounded India's eastern coastline Saturday, as hundreds of thousands of people took shelter from a massive, powerful cyclone that was expected to reach land in a few hours.

The skies were dark — almost black — at midmorning in Bhubaneshwar, the capital of Orissa state and about 100 kilometers (60 miles) from the coast. Roaring winds made palm trees sway wildly, and to the south, seawater was pushing inland.

Read more
Parallels
3:54 am
Sat October 12, 2013

What Did The Arab Spring Cost? One Estimate Says $800 Billion

Anti-government demonstrators crowd Cairo's Tahrir Square in February 2011. A report from HSBC says Egypt and other Arab Spring countries will lose a total of $800 billion by the end of next year because of the unrest.
Mohammed Abed AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 11:41 am

The Arab Spring unleashed massive, region-wide political turmoil, unseated longtime strongmen and it's still playing out. But what did it all cost?

A lot, according to a new report from the bank HSBC:

Read more
Music Interviews
2:03 am
Sat October 12, 2013

Electronic Music's Godfather Isn't Done Innovating

Morton Subotnick performs at New York's La MaMa Experimental Theatre Club in 2004. The pioneering electronic composer recently created a mobile app for children.
Jack Vartoogian Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 8:05 am

Read more
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:18 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Prediction

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 11:42 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now, panel, what will be the new Nobel Prize awarded for? Brian Babylon.

BRIAN BABYLON: It's going to be a super duper peace prize given to each American for putting up with Congress' crap.

(LAUGHTER)

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Jessi Klein.

JESSI KLEIN, COMEDIAN: There will be a Nobel Prize for twerking.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And Luke Burbank.

LUKE BURBANK: The Nobel Prize for open letter to Miley Cyrus.

Read more
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:18 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Lightning Fill In The Blank

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 11:42 am

All the news we couldn't fit anywhere else.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:18 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Limericks

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 11:42 am

Carl reads three news-related limericks...Not Feline Fine, Pawn Police, Treble Trickery.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:18 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Panel Round Two

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 11:42 am

More questions for the panel: The Harvest of Lights, Tasted But Not Heard, Please Panic Now.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:18 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Bluff The Listener

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 11:42 am

Our panelists tell three stories about an unusual family reunion, only one of which is true.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:18 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Panel Round One

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 11:42 am

Our panelists answer questions about the week's news: Stairmaster to Nowhere.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:18 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Who's Carl This Time

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 11:42 am

Carl Kasell reads three quotes from the week's news: Nobody's Default But Our Own, A New Kind of Ms. Moneypenny and U-A-S! U-A-S!

Pages