World

Book Reviews
7:03 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Crowley Meets Crime Novel In 'Love Is The Law'

"There are no coincidences," Dawn Seliger says repeatedly throughout Nick Mamatas' new novel, Love Is the Law. She's not just philosophizing. She's chanting. In the book, Dawn is a teenage punk and aspiring magician who haunts late-'80s Long Island, stewing in her own adolescent alienation, rebellion and precocity. That is, until Bernstein, her middle-aged mentor and lover (although she denies that he's either) winds up dead from a bullet in the skull.

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Iraq
4:44 am
Wed October 9, 2013

French Press Agency Tallies Increasing Violence In Iraq

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 5:13 am

Nearly 5,000 Iraqis have been killed so far this year in sectarian bombings and other terror attacks. Renee Montagne talks to Prashant Rao, the Baghdad bureau chief for AFP, the French Press Agency, which has been keeping a grim tally of the spiraling violence this year in Iraq.

Economy
4:44 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Global Leaders Watch As U.S. Budget Drama Unfolds

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 5:04 am

President Obama traded barbs with Republican House Speaker John Boehner on Tuesday, but there was no sign that Congress is any closer to re-opening the federal government. At a news conference, Obama warned that the whole world is watching. It is, and so far the reviews aren't good.

Research News
4:44 am
Wed October 9, 2013

3 Scientists Share 2013 Nobel Prize For Chemistry

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 6:08 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. This year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry will be shared by three scientists who took chemistry inside the world of computing. This powerful technology is now used to develop drugs and perform all sorts of vital tasks in chemistry. The three winners were all born overseas but collaborated in the United States and elsewhere in the 1970s, where they started their work.

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Business
4:44 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Ikea's Chinese Stores Invite Nappers To Try Out Their Beds

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 7:00 am

So many customers have been napping on the beds in Ikea's Chinese stores that employees have begun to change the sheets daily. One store in Hong Kong invited its customers to wear their pajamas and sleep over. About 80 of them did.

Business
4:44 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Health Scares In China Hurt Yum Brands' Profits

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 6:55 am

The owner of KFC and Pizza Hut has reported a near 70 percent drop in profits this quarter. Yum Brands relies on operations in China for three quarters of its revenue. Recent food safety issues and a bird flu outbreak there hit the company especially hard.

Analysis
4:44 am
Wed October 9, 2013

George Will Compares This Budget Deadlock To Past Conflicts

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 5:08 am

Steve Inskeep talks to syndicated conservative columnist George F. Will about the current partial government shutdown, and whether the strategies pursued by both sides are any different from previous such crises.

Parallels
3:00 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Bound By Blood, Divided By Politics: Three Egyptian Sisters

Egyptian women queue outside a polling station during voting on a disputed constitution drafted by Islamist supporters of then-President Mohammed Morsi, in Giza, Egypt, last December. In a country divided by a political crisis, families are not spared.
Nasser Nasser AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 8:44 pm

Nagwa, Dina and May are sisters. All three are married, all three have children. All three had always been close — until now.

Egypt's political crisis is changing those relationships. Nagwa and May sympathize with the Muslim Brotherhood. Dina, on the other hand, supports the military, arguing that the generals are just keeping extremists at bay.

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Shots - Health News
2:58 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Proposed Treatment To Fix Genetic Diseases Raises Ethical Issues

This micrograph shows a single mitochondrion (yellow), one of many little energy factories inside a cell.
Keith R. Porter Science Source

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 3:39 pm

The federal government is considering whether to allow scientists to take a controversial step: make changes in some of the genetic material in a woman's egg that would be passed down through generations.

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Sweetness And Light
2:44 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Sick Of How U.S. Sports Are Run? Take A Look At Europe

Shadows of journalists are seen next to a FIFA logo after a recent press conference on controversy swirling around 2022 World Cup construction projects in Qatar.
Fabrice Coffrini AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 4:44 am

Complain all you want about how sports in the U.S. are run, but the playing fields aren't always greener on the other side.

In Europe, FIFA, the soccer federation, is dealing with problems associated with the 2022 World Cup's timing and venue. For one, after awarding the World Cup to Qatar, those running FIFA wonder now if it'd be better to play the games in winter when it will be cooler — only that's when all the European leagues are operating.

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Kitchen Window
1:23 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Your Favorite Beer May Become Your Favorite Ingredient

Peter Ogburn for NPR

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 12:10 pm

Craft beer is having its moment. Microbreweries and craft beer operations are thriving, and weekend warriors spend hours in the garage honing recipes and sharing test batches. Beer is what friends drink when they get together. It's fun. It's accessible. You rarely see people sipping glasses of wine at a tailgate or a backyard barbecue.

Wine is what people think of for fine cooking — steaks with red wine reduction and mussels with white wine sauce. However, beer has a place on the stove, too.

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The Two-Way
7:14 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Obama Will Tap Janet Yellen As Fed Chairwoman

Federal Reserve Vice Chair Janet Yellen speaks at an international monetary conference in Shanghai on June 3, 2013.
Peter Parks AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 7:53 pm

The White House says President Obama intends to nominate Federal Reserve Vice Chairwoman Janet Yellen to chair the Federal Reserve, once Ben Bernanke completes his term in January.

If confirmed, Yellen, 67, would be the first woman to head the American central bank.

Obama is scheduled to make the announcement at 3 p.m. ET. Wednesday.

The Wall Street Journal reports:

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The Two-Way
6:56 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Oregon's Mile Of Glacier Caves: A Hidden, And Disappearing, World

A scene from another world: entering a glacier cave on Mount Hood. Two explorers say they have mapped more than a mile of caves in Sandy Glacier.
Brent McGregor

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 9:19 pm

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It's All Politics
6:41 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Shutdown Diary: Obama Takes On The Default Deniers

At a Tuesday news conference, President Obama underscored Democrats' refusal to negotiate with Republicans on bills to reopen the government and raise the debt ceiling.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 8:30 pm

On Day 8 of the federal government's partial shutdown, President Obama called House Speaker John Boehner. But the morning phone call produced no movement toward resolution, according to readouts by aides to both men.

Here are some of Tuesday's news highlights:

President Obama

Obama gave his first lengthy press conference since early August, answering questions for more than an hour.

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The Two-Way
6:26 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Shutdown Prompts Emergency Declarations In Utah

The Virgin River Narrows in Zion National Park is a popular fall hike for thousands of visitors but the government shutdown has closed the park and drained tourism revenue and tax payments from local communities.
Wanda Gayle NPR

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 8:04 pm

Fed-up with declining tourism spending and tax revenue during the government shutdown, four Utah counties dependent on National Park and public lands visitors have declared states of emergency.

And Republican Gov. Gary Herbert has responded with a plea to President Obama to reopen the region's National Park areas with state, local and private funding.

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This Is NPR
6:14 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

The Scariest Hashtag Ever? Enter #NPRHalloweenNames At Your Own Risk

NPR

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 10:37 am

Here at NPR, we're always game for a good public radio spoof. And yesterday, the terrifyingly funny folks from Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me! (@waitwait) started their own public radio, shall we say, spook.

It all started with this tweet (which was clearly dying for a response):

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The Two-Way
6:09 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Shutdown Forces Antarctic Research Into 'Caretaker Status'

The Chalet (right) is the U.S. Antarctic Program's administrations and operations center at McMurdo Station.
Reed Scherer National Science Foundation

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 4:44 am

Earlier this week we told you that scientists who do research in Antarctica have been on pins and needles, worried that the government shutdown would effectively cancel all of their planned field work this year.

Well, those scientists just got the news they didn't want to hear.

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It's All Politics
6:04 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Does Where You Shop Depend On Where You Stand?

A composite image of a Whole Foods in Providence, R.I., and a Cracker Barrel in Springville, Utah.
Steven Senne/AP and George Frey/Landov

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 10:19 am

The federal government shutdown is now in its second week, and one big reason for the division in Washington is the growing divide between different kinds of voters back home. Those differences make news on Election Day, but they're visible every day.

Members in both parties find less and less common ground, in part because their constituents have such contrasting notions of government's proper role. And those contrasting visions often coincide with contrasting lifestyles — evident in many of the choices they make.

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The Two-Way
5:56 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

NSA Says It Has 'Mitigated' Meltdowns At Utah Data Farm

A new National Security Agency data center in Bluffdale, Utah, has had electrical problems that will delay its opening, according to reports.
George Frey Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 1:49 pm

This was supposed to be the month the National Security Agency cranked up its biggest data farm yet, in a Salt Lake City suburb.

The $1.2 billion complex covers 1.5 million square feet, and includes 100,000 square feet devoted solely to computers and servers.

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Parallels
5:45 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Asian Allies' Anxieties Rise Amid Washington Paralysis

President Obama listens as Chinese President Xi Jinping answers a question after a bilateral meeting in California on June 7.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 7:24 pm

The partial shutdown of the U.S. government has all sorts of costs — not only in the United States, but also overseas. President Obama had to cancel a trip this week to visit four nations in Asia so he could stay in Washington to deal with the political crisis. That has disappointed — even worried — some of America's friends in the region, who are counting on the United States to stand up to an increasingly assertive China.

The disappointment over the president's no-show in Asia was palpable.

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