World

The Picture Show
10:52 am
Wed October 2, 2013

A Long-Standing Love Affair With Myanmar

Woman smoking cheroot, Mandalay
Courtesy of Geoffrey Hiller

Photographer Geoffrey Hiller made his first foray into Myanmar — also known as Burma — when he was traveling around Southeast Asia in 1987. At the time, he could only get a seven-day tourist visa, and the best method for changing currency was to arrive with two cartons of cigarettes and two bottles of Johnnie Walker, then trade them for cash outside the airport.

"I'll never forget flying in from Bangkok — there were no lights at all, and all you could see was the Shwedagon Pagoda," he says of his initial arrival.

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The Two-Way
8:55 am
Wed October 2, 2013

VIDEO: 'I Quit' Dance Sure Works For Millions

The way to go? Marina Shifrin in her viral "I Quit!" video.
YouTube

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 10:28 am

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The Two-Way
8:37 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Top Stories: Day 2 Of Government Shutdown; Jobs Report

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 10:13 am

Good morning, here are our early stories:

-- Shutdown Solution? There's None To Be Seen Just Yet.

-- 166,000 Jobs Added In September, Survey Says.

And here are more early headlines:

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It's All Politics
7:20 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Wednesday Morning Political Mix

A visitor to the federally run Folk Art Center in Asheville, N.C., on Tuesday expressed the dismay many felt because of the government shutdown.
Chuck Burton AP

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 8:30 am

It's Day Two of the Federal Government Shutdown, 2013 edition with no end in sight.

So there's a heavy focus on shutdown-related items or themes today in this morning's political mix of items and themes that caught my eye:

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The Two-Way
7:15 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Book News: Forward Prize For Poetry Goes To Michael Symmons Roberts

Michael Symmons Roberts, pictured in 2004, has been described as "a religious poet in a secular age."
Gareth Cattermole Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 9:52 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Education
4:52 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Dekle First Female President At An Iraqi University

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 5:06 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

There is an old Arab saying that proclaims books are written in Cairo, published in Beirut and read in Baghdad. Those cradles of civilization were cradles of learning, and that education continues even as those places in modern times fell into unrest and violence, in part thanks to a string of English-language American universities dating back to Beirut in the 1800s.

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Africa
4:52 am
Wed October 2, 2013

After School Attack, Nigeria's President Calls For Unity

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 6:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The president of Nigeria is calling on his country to overcome its religious and ethnic divisions and to avoid becoming another Syria. President Goodluck Jonathan's warning came after an attack last weekend on a school there. At least 40 students died when gunmen stormed an agricultural school in Nigeria's mostly Muslim northeast.

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Latin America
4:52 am
Wed October 2, 2013

'Castrocare' Divides Doctors In Cuba, Brazil

Cuba is sending thousands of badly needed doctors to Brazil, but Brazil's medical establishment has sought to block the program. Here, Cuban Dr. Yocelin Macias treats a patient in the capital Brasilia on Aug. 30.
Eraldo Peres AP

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 9:48 am

Call it "Castrocare." Cuba's former leader Fidel Castro sent doctors abroad for decades to work throughout Latin America and as far away as Africa.

In some cases, like Haiti, the medical missions were seen as purely humanitarian. In other places, like Venezuela, it was a form of barter that provided Cuba with subsidized oil imports.

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Business
4:52 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Businesses Cater To Furloughed Government Workers

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 6:50 am

In Washington, D.C., dozens of businesses are running shutdown specials for government employees. Furloughed workers can head to several local eateries for a cup of coffee, cupcakes and even pizza — all free when they show a government ID.

Music News
3:32 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Gospel's Blind Boys Meet Changing Times With Open Minds

I'll Find a Way is the latest album in The Blind Boys of Alabama's seven-decade run. Left to right: Ricky McKinnie, Paul Beasley, Jimmy Carter, Ben Moore, Joey Williams.
Cameron Wittig Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 11:56 am

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Sweetness And Light
3:28 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Love Of Victory In The Time Of Steroids

The Straight Dope: The use of steroids and blood doping traces back at least into the 1970s.
Robert Byron iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 12:18 pm

There's a certain anniversary irony to the fact that Alex Rodriquez's illegal doping ban appeal hearing is taking place this week, for it was, essentially, a quarter-of-a-century ago that what we think of as the drug era in sports began.

And here A-Rod is now, 38 years old, his body in betrayal (perhaps from years of all the drugs), hitting .244, hearing boos, even at home at Yankee Stadium, yet pleading desperately for a lesser sentence at the price of suffering more embarrassing revelations — a figure of pity that no one does.

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Africa
3:27 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Did Kenyan Soldiers Loot Mall During Fight With Terrorists?

Bullet holes in the glass door of a shop in the Westgate Mall in Nairobi, Kenya.
Rukmini Callimachi AP

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 11:00 am

More than a week after Islamic militants stormed an upscale mall in Nairobi, Kenya, President Uhuru Kenyatta has vowed to set up a commission to look into lapses in intelligence and security. At least 67 people died in the four-day siege, which ended with dozens still unaccounted for.

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Parallels
3:26 am
Wed October 2, 2013

World Immigration Called 'Win-Win' For Rich Nations, And Poor

Migrant workers from Nepal take part in a Labor Day rally in Hong Kong in May. This week, the United Nations holds a high-level meeting on issues related to worldwide migration.
Philippe Lopez AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 9:49 am

The number of people who leave their countries to work abroad is soaring, according to the United Nations. More than 200 million people now live outside their country of origin, up from 150 million a decade ago.

And migration isn't just from poor countries to rich countries anymore. There also is significant migration from rich country to rich country — and even from poor country to poor.

Beginning Thursday, the U.N. will hold a high-level meeting on the subject in New York.

Moving For Work

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Kitchen Window
12:58 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Farro: An Ancient And Complicated Grain Worth Figuring Out

Farro is a type of grain with a nutty flavor and ancient roots.
Laura B. Weiss for NPR

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 1:23 pm

I was ready to forget about farro. This was a couple of years ago when I first attempted to cook the savory grain that also boasts an ancient pedigree. I had sampled farro in restaurants where I had enjoyed it transformed into risottos and incorporated into salads. I had come to adore its nutty earthiness and satisfying chew.

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The Two-Way
6:52 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

The Shutdown's Squeeze On Science And Health

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This image was posted by NASA to the agency's official Instagram account.
NASA Getty Images

In addition to shutdowns of national parks (including Alcatraz Island and Yosemite) and the supplemental nutrition program for women, infants and children, the mandatory furloughs are affecting a wide range of government science and health agencies. Here's a snapshot:

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It's All Politics
6:21 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Shutdown Diary: War Of Words, And A Victory For Some WWII Vets

Veterans who came to Washington Tuesday to see the World War II memorial on the National Mall were able to complete their visit, although the memorial — like other federal museums and memorials — was officially closed to the public.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 8:33 pm

Day 1 of the federal government shutdown, 2013 edition, was business as usual, at least when it came to each side trying to win the message war and keep the pressure on the political opposition in the hope of getting them to blink first.

President Obama had a White House Rose Garden event to mark what also was the first day individuals were able to enroll in the Affordable Care Act's health insurance exchanges. With real people who would benefit from the law arrayed behind him in a photo op, he used the moment to blast Republicans.

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It's All Politics
6:20 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Congressional Staff Pay Caught Up In Health Care Fight

Congressional staffers, as well as some in the executive branch, could end up getting hit with a large pay cut if a plan to cut a subsidy related to the Affordable Care Act moves forward.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 8:20 pm

The big fight among members of Congress over the Affordable Care Act could spell big pay cuts — as much as $12,000 — for their employees.

How is this possible? Congressional staffers are most likely wondering the same thing.

Look back to the drafting of the act four years ago. At the time, Iowa Republican Sen. Charles Grassley argued that if the health insurance exchanges were good enough for ordinary Americans, they should be good enough for members of Congress and their staff members. Democrats went along with his argument, and it was included in the law.

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The Two-Way
6:13 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Shutdown And Out: Waiting For The Train Home

Pat Barnes of Hanover, Md. waits for her train at Union Station in Washington, D.C. on Oct. 1, the first day of the government shutdown. Barnes is a federal employee and was sent home early in response to the shutdown.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 1:07 pm

Two extra midday commuter trains left D.C.'s Union Station this afternoon, shuttling federal employees deemed "nonessential" home to Virginia and Maryland.

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The Two-Way
6:08 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Scenes Of A Shutdown: A Synagogue Hosts Furloughed Workers

To lighten the mood, organizers provided Ping-Pong paddles decorated with head-shots of party leaders in Congress.
Christina Cauterucci NPR

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 6:51 pm

As more than 800,000 government employees were sent home this morning, the staff at Washington, D.C.'s Sixth & I Historic Synagogue opened "Shutdown Central," a gathering space for furloughed locals to work and play.

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The Two-Way
5:26 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Pope Francis Says The Court Is The 'Leprosy Of The Papacy'

Pope Francis delivers a speech during a meeting with young people last month in Cagliari, Italy.
Franco Origlia Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 6:37 pm

Pope Francis is meeting on Tuesday with his closest advisors, a hand-picked lot of like-minded cardinals, to discuss the direction of the Roman Catholic Church.

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