World

Planet Money
5:00 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Episode 436: If Economists Controlled The Borders

Who gets in?
Scazon Flickr

Note: Today's show is a re-run. It originally ran in February, 2013.

For the first time in a while, there's political momentum building to change the U.S. immigration system. On today's show, we ask three economists: What would the perfect system look like? If we could scrap the mess of a system that we currently have and replace it with anything, what would it look like?

Among the answers:

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Shots - Health News
4:58 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Why Anthropologists Join An Ebola Outbreak Team

Health specialists work in an isolation ward for patients in Guékedou, southern Guinea.
Seyllou AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 2:07 pm

When disease strikes in the developing world, like the current Ebola outbreak in Guinea, doctors, nurses and epidemiologists from international organizations fly in to help.

So do anthropologists.

Understanding local customs — and fears — can go a long way in getting communities to cooperate with international health care workers, says Barry Hewlett, a medical anthropologist at Washington State University.

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Mountain Stage
4:37 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Sam Baker On Mountain Stage

Sam Baker.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 4:41 pm

Singer-songwriter Sam Baker makes his first appearance on Mountain Stage, live from the Culture Center Theater in Charleston W.Va.

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Author Interviews
4:16 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

The Rise And Fall Of Stefan Zweig, Who Inspired 'Grand Budapest Hotel'

Stefan Zweig was born to a prosperous Jewish family in Vienna. He wrote novels, short stories and biographies.
Keystone/Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 9:54 pm

In Wes Anderson's latest film, The Grand Budapest Hotel, a writer relates the long and twisting life story of a hotel owner. It's about youthful love and lifelong obsession, and while the story is original, there's a credit at the end that reads: "Inspired by the Writings of Stefan Zweig."

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The Salt
3:28 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Should We Close Part Of The Ocean To Keep Fish On The Plate?

A tuna fishing boat drags a cage of nets on the Mediterranean sea in 2010. (The Mediterranean is not considered to be part of the "high seas.")
Andreas Solaro AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 5:55 pm

For lovers of fatty tuna belly, canned albacore and swordfish kebabs, here's a question: Would you be willing to give them up for several years so that you could eat them perhaps for the rest of your life?

If a new proposal to ban fishing on the open ocean were to fly, that's essentially what we might be faced with. It's an idea that might help restore the populations of several rapidly disappearing fish – like tuna, swordfish and marlin — that we, and future generations, might like to continue to have as a food source.

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The Two-Way
3:18 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Putin Divorce Final; Ex-Wife Expunged From Kremlin Bio

Vladimir Putin and Lyudmila arrive at a polling station in Moscow, Russia, in a March 2012 photo.
Alexander Zemlianichenko AP

Russian President Vladimir Putin and his wife of 30 years, Lyudmila, are now divorced, the Kremlin confirmed Wednesday.

The divorce was finalized months after the couple announced on national television in June that they intended to end the marriage. At the time, Putin said: "It was a joint decision: we hardly see each other, each of us has our own life." She called the divorce "civilized" and added that the two would always remain close.

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NPR Story
2:19 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Acceptance Letters In Hand, Students Wonder How To Pay

(silversnake852/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 2:51 pm

It’s that time of year again — when college acceptance (and rejection) letters find their way into the hands of nervous high school seniors. But that’s the easy part. Exponentially more complicated is figuring out how to pay.

The average cost of four-year-private college in 2013 was $30,094. The sticker price at in-state public colleges is close to $9,000 or $22,000, if you’re coming from out of state. And those jaw-dropping estimates don’t include room and board, books or even an apple to give the teacher.

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NPR Story
2:18 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Cass Sunstein On Conspiracy Theories

Cass Sunstein is pictured in the White House in March 2011, when he was Director of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs at the Office of Management and Budget. (AP)

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 2:51 pm

Harvard law professor Cass Sunstein says pick your topic — the tragic disappearance of the Malaysian plane, Ukraine, the NSA, the economic crisis, even the authorship of Shakespeare’s plays — and you can find a conspiracy theory.

Sunstein himself has faced hate mail and threats after his time in the Obama White House, and for his articles on topics such as FDR and the rights of animals. Glenn Beck repeatedly described him as “the most dangerous man in America.”

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NPR Story
2:18 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Embattled D.C. Mayor Concedes In Primary

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 2:51 pm

Last night, Muriel Bowser, Democratic mayoral candidate in Washington, D.C., won the primary election positioning her to be the next mayor of the nation’s capital.

The election took a dramatic twist three weeks ago when federal prosecutors alleged that the current Mayor Vincent Gray was aware of an illegal $680,000 slush fund that aided his 2010 mayoral campaign.

Patrick Madden, city hall reporter for WAMU, joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson with details.

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NPR Story
2:18 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Space Artist Brings 'Alien Worlds' To Life

On the planet of Venera, Coneheads walk in packs. Aguilar imagines that these creatures might have a great sense of smell and communicate using odor. (David Aguilar)

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 2:51 pm

David Aguilar’s office at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is a lot like any office in the building — except it’s full of aliens.

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All Tech Considered
2:00 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

While Warning Of Chinese Cyberthreat, U.S. Launches Its Own Attack

Staff members study networking at the training room of the Huawei Technologies Co. headquarters in Shenzhen, China, in June 2011.
Kin Cheung AP

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 2:54 pm

The U.S. government has long complained about Chinese hacking and cyberattacks, but new documents show that the National Security Agency managed to penetrate the networks of Huawei, a large Chinese telecommunications firm, gathering information about its operations and potentially using equipment it sells to other countries to monitor their computer and telephone networks as well.

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World Cafe
2:00 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Tinariwen On World Cafe

Tinariwen.
Marie Planeille Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 3:54 pm

Today's episode of World Cafe features a couple of sparse, dry, angular and beautiful songs, performed live by the band Tinariwen. The group, made up of musicians from the Tuareg tribespeople of Northern Mali, has been making music together since 1979. Known for long, trance-inducing concert performances, the band has become increasingly revered in the West. Tinariwen's 2012 album Tassili even won a Grammy.

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All Songs Considered
1:41 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Recommended Dose: The Best Dance Tracks Of March

Greek producer Giganta released an excellent EP, Force, on Actress' Werkdiscs label in March.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 2:18 pm

In the world of dance music, March will be remembered first and foremost for the passing of house progenitor Frankie Knuckles on the final day of the month. If you haven't read our remembrance by Barry Walters, please stop what you're doing and check it out. It's hard to put into words what Knuckles meant to dance music, which makes Walters' piece all the more impressive.

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Shots - Health News
1:40 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Is It Time To Reconsider Breast Self-Exams?

Twitter user @AshleighEarley participates in the The Sun's Check'em Tuesday campaign.
Twitter.com

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:56 am

Perhaps your mother told you. Or your doctor. Maybe you learned it in gym class.

For me it was all three: "Once a month, do a breast self-exam," they all said. "Use your fingertips in a circular motion to feel for lumps." (My mom, a nurse, even brought home a fake breast that I could practice on.)

So I was stunned when a physician in Glasgow, Scotland, criticized a campaign aimed at getting women to do their own breast checkups.

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NPR Story
1:18 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Comedian Kumail Nanjiani On HBO's 'Silicon Valley'

(Nate Smith/Driven by Boredom via Facebook)

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 2:51 pm

Some comics are launching a new startup — a fictional one for HBO’s new comedy, “Silicon Valley.”

It’s a half hour live action series that lampoons, well, the startup cult of Silicon Valley. The show, which premieres on Sunday is written and directed by Mike Judge, who was also behind “Beavis and Butt-head,” “Office Space” and “King of the Hill.”

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NPR Story
1:17 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Some States Seek To Bless Prayer In Public Schools

High school football players in Suitland, Md., pray with their coach Ed Shields (top right) before a game in 2013.
John McDonnell The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 8:47 pm

Religious groups have been testing the limits on prayer in public school for decades. Now they think they've come up with a new strategy that will allow students to pray wherever and whenever they want.

Bills have been moving in a number of states that would allow students to engage in prayer at school functions such as graduation.

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Afghanistan
12:56 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Suicide Bomber Targets Afghan Police

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 1:04 pm

In the Afghan capital Kabul, a suicide bomber wearing a police uniform walked up to a checkpoint outside the headquarters of the Interior Ministry and killed several members of the national police.

NPR Story
12:28 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Did Kim And Kanye Deserve Or Disgrace Vogue Cover?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
12:21 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

What Universe Is This, Anyway?

Observing the multitude of galaxies in our own universe is a piece of cake. Observing the multiverse, if such a thing exists, seems impossible. Above, the Milky Way rises above the ESO's ALMA observatory in Chile.
Y.Beletsky ESO

Let's take a walk on the wild side and assume, for the sake of argument, that our universe is not the only one; let's say there are many others, possibly infinitely many, "out there." The totality of this bizarre ensemble is what cosmologists call the "multiverse," a hypothesis that sounds more mythic than scientific, a conceptual troublemaker that inspires some and outrages others.

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Parallels
11:58 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Afghanistan's Next President Will Be ...

A man walks past a billboard for presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani in the Afghan capital Kabul. President Hamid Karzai is stepping down and the country is poised for its first-ever democratic transition of power. The ballot is set for Saturday.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 1:47 pm

Afghanistan's presidential election on Saturday will usher in a host of important changes: incumbent Hamid Karzai is stepping aside, it's not clear who will replace him, and the vote will mark the first time the country has ever swapped leaders at the ballot box.

Karzai won the two elections (2004 and 2009) held since the Taliban were ousted in 2001, but is barred by term limits from running again.

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