World

NPR Story
2:56 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Airbnb Set To Surpass Hyatt, Wyndham Hotels In Value

Airbnb -- the online site that directly connects travelers to people who want to rent out their homes to them -- is reportedly valued at $10 billion. (Effie Yang/Flickr)

Airbnb, the online market for home and room rentals may be worth $10 billion.

The five-year-old start up lets people rent their rooms and homes directly to travelers, and it’s already one of Silicon Valley’s big success stories. The company is now reportedly in talks with investors for a new round of financing based on a valuation of about $10 billion.

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Parallels
2:50 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Can Europe Wean Itself Off Russian Gas?

The Russian gas giant Gazprom's Adler thermal power plant in Sochi, Russia. Europe gets about one-third of its natural gas from Russia.
Yuri Kadobnov AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 6:22 pm

Many European nations were searching for ways to cut back their reliance on Russian energy long before the crisis in Ukraine flared last month.

In 2006 and 2009, for example, the EU was rattled by the ease with which Moscow cut off gas supplies to Ukraine and other parts of Europe after disputes over cost and supply. The two-week standoff in 2009 left millions in Eastern Europe without heat in the middle of winter.

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The Two-Way
2:33 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Reports: FBI Agent Who Killed Chechen During Boston Bombing Probe Is Cleared

Ibragim Todashev, in an undated booking photo provided by the Orange County (Fla.) Corrections Department.
Reuters /Landov

Florida State Attorney Jeff Ashton will not charge an FBI agent who shot and killed a Chechen man being questioned in connection to the twin bombings at the 2013 Boston Marathon, The Boston Globe, the Associated Press and

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Song Travels
1:56 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Peter Yarrow And Noel Paul Stookey On 'Song Travels'

Noel Paul Stookey (left) and Peter Yarrow.
Courtesy of the artists

The iconic folk trio Peter, Paul and Mary made music together for nearly 50 years, arriving on the scene with a 1962 self-titled album and its hit "If I Had a Hammer." Mary Travers died in 2009, but Peter Yarrow and Noel Paul Stookey continue to tour as a duo.

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NPR Story
1:45 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

The Two Kings Of New Hampshire

Larry Keene is basing the design of his castle on Searles Castle, in Winhdam, NH. (Sean Hurley/NHPR)

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 2:56 pm

From the Biltmore in Asheville, North Carolina, to the Belcourt in Newport, Rhode Island, the classical European-style of architecture know as “the castle” took hold here in the U.S. during the late 1800s: America’s Gilded Age.

Most were built in the the northeast, in the 1920s, but the tradition continues to this day, though they are not always financed by Wall Street. Some are built out of pure will.

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NPR Story
1:45 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Marketers Drill Down Into Customer Data Like Never Before

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 2:56 pm

Marketing companies are gathering information about consumers’ behavior — from tracking what you watch on T.V. to where you spend time online — and using it to help businesses calculate how to target their products to you.

Media analyst John Carroll joins Here & Now’s Sacha Pfeiffer to discuss how this relatively new way of mining and manipulating data is transforming the marketing and retail industry.

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NPR Story
1:44 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Is Gun Control The New Litmus Test For The US Surgeon General?

Dr. Vivek Hallegere Murthy, President Barack Obama's nominee to be the next U.S. Surgeon General, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2014, before the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee hearing on his nomination. (Charles Dharapak/AP)

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 2:56 pm

Abortion became a litmus test for U.S Supreme Court nominees following the confirmation hearings for the late Robert Bork, 27 years ago.

Now, some doctors are worried that anything a physician says about guns may take on the same prominence for U.S. Surgeon General nominees.

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NPR Story
1:44 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

It's Reunion Day For Soldier And His Dog

Army Specialist Nate Korpusik and his Tactical Explosive Detecting Dog, Zino. Together they conducted patrols in Afghanistan for IEDs and other weapons. They are being reunited today. (Nate Korpusik)

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 2:56 pm

British soldier Liam Tasker served in Afghanistan with a Springer Spaniel named Theo. They worked together to find improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and other hidden weapons. The soldier’s colleagues said they were a match made in heaven. Shortly after Lance Corporal Tasker was killed by enemy fire in 2011, Theo also died. Tasker’s family believes he died from a broken heart. That’s just one example of the bond that grows between a soldier and his dog.

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The Salt
1:43 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

How Your Love Of Burgers May Be Helping To Drive Wildlife Extinct

Rancher Denny Johnson looks over his cattle in Joseph, Ore., in 2011. Conservationists say ranchers raising beef cattle are responsible for the decline of some wildlife.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 2:57 pm

Many animal lovers have made peace with their decision to eat meat.

But the Center for Biological Diversity has a new campaign that hopes to convince them that a hamburger habit does wildlife a disservice.

"We need to see a drastic reduction in meat consumption to protect land, water and wildlife," Stephanie Feldstein, population and sustainability director for the Center for Biological Diversity, tells The Salt.

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Movie Reviews
1:09 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Addicted To Sex, But Not Really Having Much Fun

Stacy Martin (right, with Sophie Kennedy Clark) plays the younger version of Charlotte Gainsbourg's sex-addict protagonist in Lars von Trier's Nymphomaniac — a study of sex and intimacy that's calculated, characteristically for this director, to provoke.
Christian Geisnaes Magnolia Pictures

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 8:47 pm

Danish filmmaker Lars von Trier has found all sorts of ways to provoke moviegoers in the past — with metal spikes in Antichrist, by ignoring narrative conventions in Dogville, by presenting depression as the only reasonable reaction to the world as we know it — and then destroying that world — in Melancholia. And as if this last weren't enough, he told a Nazi joke to a crowd prepared to shower him with adulation at Cannes.

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The Two-Way
1:08 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Down Goes Duke In Biggest Upset So Far

Duke forward Amile Jefferson, in white, and Mercer guard Langston Hall battle for the ball during Friday's game.
Gerry Broome AP

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 6:53 pm

We updated this post with the first shock of the day at 2:35 p.m. ET:

It's one-and-done for the Duke Blue Devils as their men's basketball team was beaten Friday by the Mercer Bears, 78-71, in the Division I men's basketball championship.

Mercer, a No. 14 seed in the Midwest region, was a huge underdog to the No. 3 seed Duke.

The win for Mercer, which has its main campus in Macon, Ga., is by far the biggest upset of the tournament so far. Heading into play, Duke was No. 8 in The Associated Press rankings. Mercer wasn't even among the nation's top 75 teams.

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The Mix
1:08 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

10 Celtic Songs To Kick Off Spring

Patryk Kosmider
Patryk Kosmider iStock

Welcome in the new season with these 10 vernal-themed songs from NPR Music Radio's 24/7 channel highlighting Celtic music, ThistleRadio.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
1:02 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Andrew Hill On Piano Jazz

Andrew Hill photographed in his home, 2005.
Jimmy Katz Courtesy of the artist

Fifty years ago today, Andrew Hill recorded what would become his signature album: Point of Departure. Fifty years later, it still sounds like it could have been recorded yesterday. Assembling a murderer's row of horn players (Eric Dolphy, Kenny Dorham, Joe Henderson) with a rhythm section for the ages (Hill, Richard Davis, Tony Williams), Hill juxtaposed complex, layered harmonies with charged grooves. The result occupies that rare territory between the comfort of the familiar and the allure of the perceptibly unique.

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NPR Story
12:37 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Super Soul Sucker

Glynn lands a primo gig selling a gadget that sells itself.

NPR Story
12:37 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Breaker-Upper

Jonathan Kiekbusch discovered he had a secret talent people would pay for. If someone wanted breakup with a girlfriend or boyfriend, but didn't have the guts, he would handle the dirty work.

NPR Story
12:37 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Temptations Of War

James just wanted to film the war in Liberia. But bloody conflicts dirty even the cleanest of hands. Find out more about James Brabazon's story in his book, "My Friend the Mercenary."

From Scratch
12:11 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Daphne Koller, Coursera Co-Founder

From Scratch Host Jessica Harris talks with Daphne Koller, co-founder of Coursera. Coursera is a company providing online classes to the public. She also speaks with Fred Swaniker, co-founder of the African Leadership Academy.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
12:05 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Thai Court Throws Out Election, Thrusting Country Back Into Limbo

Crowds of people railed against the Thai Constitutional Court's ruling during a rally Friday in central Bangkok.
Athit Perawongmetha Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 1:37 pm

Thailand's Constitutional Court has voided results from last month's national election, which returned Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra and her party to power despite a boycott by the opposition.

The decision has thrown the country back into a state of political uncertainty and stoked fears of renewed violence between the premier's supporters and anti-government protesters.

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Shots - Health News
11:49 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Why Cholera Persists In Haiti Despite An Abundance Of Aid

A makeshift latrine hangs over the water at the edge of Cite de Dieu, a slum in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 8:14 am

It's been more than three years since cholera struck Haiti. And the epidemic continues today.

The deadly bacteria have killed more than 8,500 people and infected hundreds of thousands.

Why has the outbreak been so hard to stop, even with more than $9 million in foreign aid pledged to Haiti?

Lack of sanitation, says journalist Jonathan Katz, who has been covering the cholera epidemic since it began.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:44 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Wig Out With The Big Bach Puzzler

Match your wits against the granddaddy of composers in this big Bach puzzler.
Wikimedia Commons

Johann Sebastian Bach, with his big white wig, might stand as the "supreme arbiter and lawgiver of music," as musicologist Nicolas Slonimsky says. But the composer, organist, choirmaster and teacher could also be surprisingly witty and irreverent.

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