World

The Mix
11:43 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Get Lucky On St. Patrick's Day With These 25 R&B Songs

Thomas Samson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 1:12 pm

Get ready for St. Patrick's Day with these 25 lucky love songs from NPR R&B. And if you want to stay up all night, check out hundreds of more soul, funk, disco and slow jams on our NPR Music Radio channel, I'll Take You There.

All Songs Considered
11:41 am
Sun March 16, 2014

NPR Music At SXSW 2014: Saturday

Kishi Bashi performs at The Dirty Dog in Austin, Texas during the 2014 South by Southwest Music festival.
Bob Boilen NPR
  • Listen to All Songs Considered at SXSW - Saturday

Saturday at SXSW, things go over the edge. Language fails. The mind shimmies free from its moorings. Maybe it's the fatigue. Maybe it's the crowds. You could argue that the constant waves of sound that rattle eardrums over five days in Austin jars something loose inside a person's brain.

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The Two-Way
11:11 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Flight 370: Investigators Seek Help, Motive For Jet's Disappearance

Relatives of Chinese passengers from the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 met officials at a Beijing hotel Sunday. The flight disappeared from radar more than a week ago.
Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 11:47 am

Malaysian officials are asking more than a dozen nations to help find the jetliner that went missing last weekend. The search area for the Boeing 777 was widely expanded Saturday; investigators are now looking for potential motives among the plane's crew and passengers to disrupt the flight.

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Middle East
10:58 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Saudi Aid Boost To Syrian Rebels Puts Jordan At Risk

Syrian refugees have flooded the Zaatari refugee camp, near the Jordanian border with Syria.
Khalil Mazraawi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 11:55 am

For months, a military stalemate has defined the war in Syria. Now, a new strategy is emerging as Western allies and Gulf states step up support for rebels in southern Syria.

Along Jordan's northern border, Syrian rebels say they are unifying their fractious ranks, urged to unite by Western and Arab intelligence operatives who work in a covert command center in Jordan's capital.

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The Two-Way
9:02 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Gunmen Raid Nigerian Villages, Killing More Than 100 People

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 11:48 am

New violence has erupted in central Nigeria, where a dispute over grazing land has reportedly sparked a raid that officials say killed more than 100 people.

Details are still emerging about the attack, which struck several villages on Friday. The BBC says heavily armed men attacked three villages, where they looted and destroyed homes and burned their victims' bodies.

NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports for our Newscast unit:

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Europe
7:51 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Ukrainians Wary Of Putin's Designs On Their Country

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 11:32 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Crimeans are voting today on whether to break away from Ukraine. The Ukrainian government and the West have condemned the Russian-led referendum. Adding to tensions, on Saturday, Russian forces moved to occupy a gas depot in another Ukrainian region. In the capital city of Kiev, people see the move as further proof that Russian President Vladimir Putin's designs on their country will not end in Crimea.

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Middle East
7:51 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Radio Pirates Risk Dangers Of War To Reach Syrian People

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 11:32 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Opposition activists have found a way to get their message delivered inside Syria, where the media is otherwise state-controlled: Pirate radio. One of those radio stations is Radio Al-Kul, which means Radio for Everyone. Here's what it sounds like.

(SOUNDBITE OF RADIO AL-KUL)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Foreign language spoken)

MARTIN: Obai Sukar is one of the founders of Radio Al-Kul. He joins us from Istanbul, which is where he broadcasts his programs from. Welcome to the show.

OBAI SUKAR: Hi, welcome.

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Asia
7:51 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Search For Malaysian Jet Turns Its Focus To The Crew

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 11:32 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Malaysia is reaching out to dozens of countries as it expands the search for an airliner that went missing almost nine days ago. This comes after new data indicates that the plane flew for hours after it last made contact with civilian radar. But which direction it went after that point remains a mystery.

NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports from Beijing that despite evidence that the plane was intentionally diverted, Malaysian authorities have not said the plane was hijacked.

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Europe
7:51 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Crimeans Vote In Secession Referendum

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 11:32 am

Crimea votes on a referendum that would set the stage for secession from Ukraine. Correspondent Gregory Warner joins NPR's Rachel Martin to describe the atmosphere Simferopol.

The Sunday Conversation
7:51 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Following His Father, A Palestinian Hopes For Peace

Yousef Bashir was 11 years old when Israeli soldiers took over his home in Gaza. When he was 15, he was shot by an Israeli soldier.
Courtesy of Oneboydesign

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 11:32 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Yousef Bashir was 11 years old when Israeli soldiers took over his home in Gaza. His family's house was right near an Israeli settlement, and the military transformed it into a sentry post.

But Bashir's father refused to leave, out of fear he would lose his land for good. The Israelis would stay in the Bashir home for five years.

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Digital Life
7:51 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Making Your Device Your Best Travel Companion

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 11:32 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Spring break is not far away. So, it's time to start planning that trip, if you haven't booked it already. This is when those smartphones and tablets come in handy, right? I mean, they are supposed to help us be more organized. It's not really working for me. On this week's Wingin' It, though, we're going to attempt to help you make best use of your digital devices when traveling.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Digital Life
7:51 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Authors Tighten Up Their Stories For Twitter Fiction Festival

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 11:32 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Asia
7:51 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Tsunami's Ghosts Haunt Japanese Earthquake Survivors

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 11:32 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It's been a little more than three years since the biggest earthquake in Japan's history, a quake that caused an unforgettable tsunami that killed some 20,000 people.

But the earthquake also had quieter consequences that didn't make headlines. In the London Review of Books, Richard Lloyd Parry investigates a peculiar phenomenon revealed in the aftermath of the storm. His piece is called "Ghosts of the Tsunami."

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Book Reviews
7:38 am
Sun March 16, 2014

The Lively Linguistical Exuberance Of 'Being Blue'

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 11:06 am

LANGUAGE ADVISORY: This review contains language some readers may find offensive.

First published in 1976 and now reissued by NYRB Classics, On Being Blue: A Philosophical Inquiry is an exploration of color and language, a celebration of the written and the spoken. In the hands of a novelist like William H. Gass, blue becomes everything there is to know about the world. "Blue pencils, blue noses, blue movies, laws, blue legs and stockings, the language of birds, bees, and flowers as sung by longshoremen." For starters, yes.

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Music Interviews
5:42 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Tycho: Music By A Visual Imagineer

Zac Brown (left) and Scott Hansen of Tycho.
Reuben Wu Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 11:32 am

Let's say you're driving down the Pacific Coast Highway in California — top down, of course. What's the soundtrack you want to hear? The music of Tycho often seems engineered to fill that very role.

The group is the brainchild of producer Scott Hansen, who describes his three-piece band as an audio-visual project. On the new album Awake, the San Francisco-based artist has taken his passion for design and merged it with his interest in ambient music; click the audio link to hear his conversation with NPR's Rachel Martin.

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You Must Read This
5:14 am
Sun March 16, 2014

A Circle Of Spies Hit The Road, Filling A 'Dossier' Of Mystery

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 9:43 am

A few years ago, I spent the winter in Germany, teaching at Leipzig University. I'd never taught before, and it was exciting, particularly because one of the classes I'd come up with was a survey course on spy novels. The class filled up quickly — those resourceful Leipzig students recognized an easy A when they saw it — and I was eager to share the best of an often-maligned genre with them. We looked at W. Somerset Maugham's Ashenden stories, Eric Ambler, Graham Greene, John le Carre, Len Deighton, and Alan Furst.

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Parallels
5:13 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Which Place Is More Sexist: The Middle East Or Latin America?

On the left: Women wearing burqas walk by the Gulf of Aqaba in Jordan in 2006. Right: Women in bikinis visit a beach in Rio de Janeiro in 2013.
Marco Di Fabio and Nelson Almeida Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 3:57 pm

A semi-naked woman in a sequined Carnival costume. A veiled woman with only her eyes showing in a niqab. Two stereotypes of two vastly different regions — Latin America and the Middle East.

On the surface, these two images couldn't be more diametrically opposed. What could the two have in common, right? What a woman wears — or what she doesn't wear, in Brazil's case — is often interpreted as a sign of her emancipation. The veil, for many, is a symbol of female oppression; the right to wear a bikini, one of liberation.

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The Two-Way
2:53 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Crimea Overwhelmingly Supports Split From Ukraine To Join Russia

People in Simferopol, Ukraine, attend a pro-Russian rally in Lenin Square after a day of voting on whether to unite with Russia. Exit polls show strong approval for the move, according to Russian state-run media.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 9:59 pm

  • NPR's Gregory Warner on 'Weekend Edition Sunday'
This post will be updated throughout the day Sunday.

Russian news services are claiming overwhelming support in Crimea for the region's plan to secede from Ukraine and unite with Russia, citing exit polls from Sunday's referendum. Russia's state news agency reports that afer 50 percent of the votes had been processed that more than 95 percent of voters said they were in favor of joining Russia.

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Middle East
5:33 pm
Sat March 15, 2014

Reflecting On 3-Year Syrian War: 'There But For The Grace Of God'

Saturday is the three-year anniversary of the war in Syria. Nigel Timmins of Oxfam talks with NPR's Arun Rath about the humanitarian crisis there and the Syrian people he has met.

World
5:33 pm
Sat March 15, 2014

Ukrainians Scramble For Information Ahead Of Crimean Vote

On the eve of the referendum in Crimea, Ukrainians are reportedly nervous about what will happen after Sunday's vote. Correspondent Eleanor Beardsley talks with NPR's Arun Rath about the mood in Kiev.

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