World

Animals
7:10 am
Thu February 27, 2014

Koala Escapes From Zoo, Naps And Then Gets Hungry

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 7:30 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene with a wild story of adventure and escape. OK, not that wild. Mundu, two year old koala, went missing from his exhibit at the San Diego Zoo on Tuesday. Not to worry, he's been found. He escaped his enclosure and fell asleep, spending the day in a tree nearby. Zookeepers lured him back with eucalyptus.

Animals
6:34 am
Thu February 27, 2014

Team USA Hockey Player Adopts 2 Stray Dogs From Sochi

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 7:30 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene. Team USA hockey player David Backes did not bring home gold this year. But he did bring home two stray dogs from Sochi. The stray animal population in the Russian resort town received a good bit of attention during the games, and Backes hopes these animals will help raise awareness. The dogs will be monitored in an animal shelter for 30 days, where one caretaker says they'll be getting them ready for adoption, and also teaching them English.

Europe
5:07 am
Thu February 27, 2014

Tensions Over Ukraine's Future Are Most Acute In Crimea

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 7:30 am

The Crimean Peninsula has a majority ethnic Russian population. Armed men took over 2 government buildings and raised the Russian flag. David Greene talks to Courtney Weaver of the Financial Times.

Asia
5:06 am
Thu February 27, 2014

Touring Reactor No. 4 At Tsunami-Damaged Fukushima Nuclear Plant

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 7:30 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

It has been nearly three years since a massive earthquake and tsunami in Japan killed nearly 20,000 people. Another victim: the Fukushima nuclear power plant. There was a meltdown at three reactors there. Cleaning up and shutting down that plant involves huge challenges and risks that are expected to last for decades.

NPR's Anthony Kuhn recently went inside one of the damaged plant's nuclear reactors, and he filed this report.

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Food
5:04 am
Thu February 27, 2014

From Aztecs To Oscars: Popcorn's Beautiful, Explosive Journey

Adam Cole NPR

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 3:06 pm

Popcorn is a truly ancient snack. Archaeologists have uncovered popcorn kernels that are 4,000 years old. They were so well-preserved, they could still pop.

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NPR Story
5:04 am
Thu February 27, 2014

Violence In South Sudan Targets Hospitals

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 7:30 am

Doctors Without Borders says patients have been shot, medical supplies looted and a hospital destroyed. David Greene talks to Sarah Maynard, a program director for the group, about the violence.

NPR Story
5:04 am
Thu February 27, 2014

NATO Pressures Karzai To Sign Troop Pact With U.S.

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 7:30 am

Without the deal, Obama told Afghan President Hamid Karzai this week that the U.S. will move ahead with plans to pull all U.S. troops out the country by the end of 2014. NATO plans to follow suit.

NPR Story
5:04 am
Thu February 27, 2014

Boeing's Smarthpone Would Self-Destruct If It's Tampered With

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 7:30 am

The company filed papers with the FCC for the phone, simply being called Black. Any attempt to tamper with the Boeing Black will result in all of its contacts, communication and software being erased.

NPR Story
5:04 am
Thu February 27, 2014

Denmark-Based Lego Releases 2013 Results

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 7:30 am

Sales increased by 11 percent. The announcement does not include revenue tied to the chart-topping movie. The Lego Movie was released this month.

NPR Story
5:04 am
Thu February 27, 2014

Tesla To Build Large-Scale Battery Factory

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 7:30 am

The company says it needs the factory to produce batteries faster and cheaper in order to build an electric car for mass market — one that can be sold for under $40,000.

Parallels
3:29 am
Thu February 27, 2014

Anti-Abortion Push Has Spain Debating Definition Of 'Progress'

Anti-abortion advocates protest in Madrid on Oct. 17, 2013. Spain's Parliament is expected to approve abortion restrictions in the coming weeks.
Daniel Ochoa de Olza AP

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 7:30 am

Born in a tiny pueblo south of Madrid, Esperanza Puente arrived in the Spanish capital fresh out of high school. It was the late 1980s, and Spain was reveling in newfound freedoms after its military dictator Francisco Franco died and democracy took hold.

"The end of the 1980s was a wild time in Madrid — alcohol, drugs, nightlife, sex without commitment. When I arrived from a small village, I ate it up, like it was the end of the world!" recalls Puente, now 43, smiling. "But I ended up pregnant, and my boyfriend suddenly didn't want anything to do with me."

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Your Health
3:28 am
Thu February 27, 2014

Good Art Is Popular Because It's Good. Right?

What makes the Mona Lisa — or any piece of art — successful?
Sergio Velayosf Flickr

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 12:47 pm

In July of last year, a man named Sidney Sealine went to see the Mona Lisa in Paris.

The idea was to spend some time with the picture, see for himself the special spark that made the painting so famous.

But Sealine couldn't even get close.

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Hollywood Jobs
3:28 am
Thu February 27, 2014

'Clap!' On Set, The Signature Sound Of The Slate

The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift. Given the crowded location, "I'm actually on the phone with my first assistant, so he could let me know when the camera is rolling," Janicin says." href="/post/clap-set-signature-sound-slate" class="noexit lightbox">
Milan "Miki" Janicin slates a scene on a location shoot for The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift. Given the crowded location, "I'm actually on the phone with my first assistant, so he could let me know when the camera is rolling," Janicin says.
Sidney Ray Baldwin

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 1:12 pm

More than the roar of the MGM lion, more than the 20th Century Fox fanfare, the iconic sound of moviemaking is the sharp clap of a slate — although film folks have a language of their own to describe it.

"Miki's hitting the sticks on this one," says assistant cameraman Larry Nielsen, pointing to his assistant.

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Parallels
3:25 am
Thu February 27, 2014

As Brazil Gears Up For Olympics, Some Poor Families Get Moved Out

The Terni apartment complex in Rio de Janeiro's far west zone of Campo Grande. Many residents were relocated to this area because their old neighborhoods were knocked down to make way for building projects related to the Olympics.
Lianne Milton for NPR

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 8:16 am

Jeane Tomas scraped all her money together to build a house where she could raise her son. She'd been renting in the favela, or shanty town, of Vila Harmonia and wanted to put down roots in the community where she lived when her child was born.

The house went up — only to quickly come down.

"There is this frustration to have worked so hard, dreamed so much to leave everything behind," she said.

Now that the Winter Olympics in Sochi are over attention will be turning to Brazil, the host of the 2016 Summer Olympics.

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Heavy Rotation
1:03 am
Thu February 27, 2014

Heavy Rotation: 10 Songs Public Radio Can't Stop Playing

Parker Millsap.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 8:21 pm

Heavy Rotation is a monthly sampler of public radio hosts' favorite songs. Check out past editions here.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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The Two-Way
9:44 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

Mapping Differences In America's Musical Tastes, State By State

A map of the U.S. lists the musical acts that set states apart from each other. It's not a matter of an artist's popularity, says Paul Lamere, who made the map, but of a state's distinct preferences.
Paul Lamere, Director of Developer Platform at The Echo Nest

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 1:24 pm

Are you streaming music right now? If you're in America's Pacific region, there's a much better chance you're nodding along with Cat Power rather than grooving to Fantasia, which you'd be more likely to be doing if you were across the country in the South Atlantic. Those observations come from a map titled "Regionalisms in U.S. Listening Preferences."

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Planet Money
9:15 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

Episode 520: Duke's $30,000 Tuition Discount

CASEY TOTH MCT /Landov

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 10:22 am

College is expensive these days. Yet, most universities argue an undergraduate education is actually worth much more than what students pay for it. Clearly there is an emotional logic to this argument. But what do the numbers tell us?

In today's episode, Planet Money takes a behind the scenes look at Duke's costs and considers the university's case that $60,000 a year is actually a discount.

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The Record
9:02 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

Paco De Lucia, Modern Superstar Of Flamenco, Dies

Paco de Lucia in 1982.
Paco Junquera Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 12:08 pm

Paco de Lucia, considered by his fans and critics to be the world's greatest flamenco guitarist, died Wednesday in Mexico of a heart attack. The 66-year-old musician was a modern superstar in a Roma, or Gypsy, tradition that is hundreds of years old.

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The Two-Way
8:03 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

Arizona Gov. Brewer Vetoes Controversial Bill

Gov. Jan Brewer, R-Ariz., on Monday at the White House when she and other state executives met with President Obama.
Kevin Lamarque Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 8:10 pm

Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer says she has vetoed controversial legislation that would have allowed business owners in her state to refuse to serve gays and others if those customers somehow offended the proprietors' religious beliefs.

Brewer, a Republican, announced her decision at a news conference held Wednesday afternoon, following a flurry of meetings between the governor and state legislators.

Update at 7:52 p.m. ET Brewer's Comments

"I call them like I see them," Brewer said of the proposal, "despite the cheers or the boos from the crowd."

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Shots - Health News
7:56 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

More Hints That Dad's Age At Conception Helps Shape A Child's Brain

Boy meets girl, sperm meets egg — how much does the age of each matter?
James Steidl/Kyle Gruba iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 5:05 pm

Traditionally, research has focused on women's "biological clock." But in recent years, scientists have been looking more and more at how the father's age at conception might affect the baby, too.

A study published Wednesday hints that age really might matter — in terms of the child's mental health.

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