World

Business
7:35 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Hello Kitty: Updated Monopoly Game Available

The Monopoly game hitting store shelves contains a sleek kitty, which will join the classic Scottie dog and top hat. Fans adopted the cat in an online vote earlier this year. The company shelved the iron after a 78 year run.

Animals
7:12 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Cat Sets Record For Long Hair

A Persian long hair in Seattle named Colonel Meow set the record. His hair stretches 9 inches. It's not that crazy for that breed of cat. His owners swear that Colonel is not using any product.

Crime In The City
7:02 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Mystery Series' Portly P.I. Peels Back The Layers Of Delhi Society

In Tarquin Hall's novels, Vish Puri's detective office is located in Khan Market, near shops like this one.
Julie McCarthy NPR

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 3:55 pm

For an introduction to India's cultural and culinary delights, you might hop a flight to Delhi or book a trip to Mumbai. But to meet the country sans passport free of airport indignities, you could just curl up with the crime novels of Tarquin Hall.

Vish Puri, Hall's opinionated private investigator, is a 50-something Punjabi super sleuth with a fondness for family and food. The mustachioed detective cracks open India's underbelly with a caseload that delves into forbidden love, corruption in Indian cricket and the deadly clash between science and superstition.

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The Two-Way
6:56 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Obama Hasn't Made Case For Striking Syria, Rumsfeld Says

Former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld in 2011.
Michael Reynolds EPA /Landov

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 8:02 am

As the U.S. and its allies seemingly move closer to some type of military action in response to Syrian President Bashar Assad's alleged use of chemical weapons to kill hundreds of his own people, one of the policymakers who led the U.S.

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Middle East
4:45 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Obama 'Concluded' Syrian Regime Conducted Chemical Attack

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 5:17 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

This morning in Syria, U.N. inspectors continue their investigation into last week's chemical weapons attack, which apparently killed hundreds of civilians. The U.N. plans for the inspection team to be in Syria's capital, Damascus, until Saturday.

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Business
4:45 am
Thu August 29, 2013

In Colombia, Starbucks To Take On Juan Valdez

Drew Angerer AP

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 1:07 pm

Seattle-based coffee giant Starbucks has announced it's going to expand to Colombia.

The country is known for its Arabica beans and for the mythical coffee farmer Juan Valdez. He's helped sell Colombia's coffee for 50 years. Starbucks has cafes in 50 countries. And now, it's coming to perhaps the country most associated with coffee.

Howard Schultz, the company's chief executive, announced that the first shop will open in Bogota in 2014, followed by 50 more cafes and in other cities over five years.

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Business
4:45 am
Thu August 29, 2013

In Spain, You Have To Pay To Play

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 7:13 am

Bunol, Spain, held its annual La Tomatina food fight on Wednesday. About 20,000 people pelted each other with tomatoes. Money is tight in Spain these days, with the country deep in recession. So for the first time, participants had to pay for the right to smear each other with some 130 tons of overripe, dripping produce.

Business
4:45 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Ford Fusion Cruises Off Dealers' Lots

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 6:51 am

Ford is ramping up production of the popular midsized car. The automaker is adding 1,400 workers, and a second shift at one of its Detroit area plants. The Fusion has helped deliver the best numbers the automaker has seen since 2006.

Europe
4:45 am
Thu August 29, 2013

British Prime Minister's Call For Action In Syria Stalls

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 5:25 am

In London, Prime Minister David Cameron had planned to get backing from Parliament Thursday – approving a possible military intervention. Instead, he's been forced to back down. The Labour Party announced it would vote against military action in Syria.

Environment
3:35 am
Thu August 29, 2013

A Cooler Pacific May Be Behind Recent Pause In Global Warming

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 11:47 am

A study in the journal Nature could help explain why the Earth's average temperature hasn't increased during the past 15 years — despite a long-term trend of global warming.

The Earth's average temperature has risen by more than 1 degree Fahrenheit since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. But the temperature rise has not been moving in lock step with the rise of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide — mainly from burning fossil fuels — traps heat in the air.

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The Salt
3:33 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Move Over, Pot Stickers: China Cooks Up Hundreds Of Dumplings

A Flock of Dumpling Ducklings: What's inside? Roasted Beijing duck, of course.
Anthony Kuhn NPR

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 7:52 pm

All week, we've been talking about dumplings — from tortellini's sensual origins in Italy to kubbeh's tasty variations in Israel.

But perhaps no country has a longer history or greater variety of dumplings than China. Dumplings come in all shapes and with every imaginable filling. They are served at everything from a humble family meal to elaborate works of culinary art.

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Movie Reviews
7:28 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

'Closed Circuit' Targets Big Brother, But Swings Pretty Wide

Eric Bana and Rebecca Hall play lawyerly allies with a complicated past — one that threatens to increase their present peril — in the surveillance-state thriller Closed Circuit.
Jay Maidment Focus Features

A massive explosion rocks a covered market, but Central London still looks mighty handsome in the British thriller Closed Circuit. So does the actress Rebecca Hall. Decked out in blacks, creams and grays, she and her city both are sleek, elegant and more than a little forbidding, even if they're softened by pockets of olde worlde soul.

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The Two-Way
6:50 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

50 Years Later: Sounds And Voices From The March

Margaret Pearson, 71, immigrated from the U.K. two months after the '63 March in Washington. She joined the crowd today.
Tanya Ballard Brown NPR

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 9:35 am

It was a cloudy and rainy day in Washington on Wednesday. But that did not keep thousands from descending on the National Mall to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington.

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The Two-Way
6:20 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Obama: U.S. Has 'Concluded' Assad Used Chemical Weapons In Syria

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 6:33 pm

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The NPR 100
6:20 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

The Inspiring Force Of 'We Shall Overcome'

American folk singer and activist Pete Seeger (left) adopted and helped popularize "We Shall Overcome" by teaching the song at rallies and protests. Here he sings with activists in Greenwood, Miss., in 1963.
Adger Cowans Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 9:26 pm

As the nation marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, All Things Considered concludes its series about the moments that defined the historic summer of 1963. Back in 1999, Noah Adams explored the history and legacy of the song "We Shall Overcome" for the NPR 100. The audio link contains a condensed version of that piece.

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This Is NPR
5:45 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Grassroots-Supported Journalism Takes On Anniversary of Drug Sentencing Laws

As part of the Prison Time Project, NCPR reported on the Moriah Shock Prison, near Port Henry, NY, which was slated to close but was saved by support of the local community.
Natasha Haverty NCPR

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 9:06 am

"For drug pushing — life sentence. No parole, no probation, no plea bargaining."

This statement, said by former New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller during a meeting with top advisers, set forth a new set of rules, passed in 1973, for sentencing in drug-related crimes. Those rules have arguably altered the sentencing of thousands of those convicted for even minor drug possession offenses in New York and nationwide over the last 40 years.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
5:41 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Joining The '63 March, Despite Parents' Racial Biases

All Washington, D.C., liquor stores were closed on Aug. 28, 1963. While Maury Landsman's parents, who owned a liquor store, stayed home that day, he was determined to participate in the march.
Charles Del Vecchio The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 8:41 pm

There would be no last call on the day of the March on Washington, and Manny and Mitzie Landsman had no choice in the matter. Their D.C. shop, Metro Liquors, was closed for business on Aug. 28, 1963, just one of 1,900 businesses ordered by local authorities not to sell, pour or wrap any alcoholic beverage from 12:01 that morning until 2 a.m. the next day.

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The Two-Way
5:17 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

China Weighs Ban On Homework; Teachers, Students Argue Against

In the hopes of easing pressures on China's students, the country' education officials are considering a ban on written homework. Here, students walk to school in Beijing in June.
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

Chinese officials hope to rein in teachers who assign too much homework, as the country's Ministry of Education considers new rules that ban schools from requiring students to complete written tasks at home. Citing undue stress on students, the ministry would also limit the number of exams students take.

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The Salt
5:13 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

The Latest Frontier In Gourmet Salt, From The Lowest Point On Earth

An Israeli man bathes in the Dead Sea. Spas have long touted the health benefits of the Dead Sea. So does Naked Sea Salt.
Sebastian Scheiner AP

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 8:34 am

When you go to the Dead Sea for a float in its extraordinarily buoyant waters, signs warn you not to drink a drop. "Did you swallow water?" one Dead Sea do's and don'ts list asks. "Go immediately to the lifeguard."

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Shots - Health News
5:13 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

In South Africa, A Clinic Focuses On Prostitutes To Fight HIV

A prostitute in Johannesburg waits for a client on a street corner. An estimated two-thirds of sex workers in South Africa are HIV positive.
Yoav Lemmer AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 9:25 pm

South Africa has come a long way in dealing with AIDS. The country has been successful in getting drug treatment to millions of people infected with HIV.

But the country still has one of the highest rates of HIV infection in the world — and the virus continues to spread. Nearly 400,000 South Africans are infected with HIV each year.

One health clinic in the heart of Johannesburg is attempting to break the HIV cycle by focusing on people at extremely high risk for infection — prostitutes.

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