World

13.7: Cosmos And Culture
8:43 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Watch And Be Amazed By The Machinery Of Life

Life, up close.
Screenshot Shadowlabs.org/YouTube

Sometimes the visible world is all we need to be astonished at this weird thing called reality. For example that big, warm, yellow ball makes it into the sky every day. And every year, somehow, Spring makes it back to us. (Hello Spring! Sooner rather than later would be nice.) But sometimes it's the invisible world that makes your head explode in wonder.

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The Two-Way
7:47 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Book News: 'Goodnight Moon' Author's Lullabies See The Light After 60 Years

If the latest compilation of works by Margaret Wise Brown, best known for the beloved children's book Goodnight Moon, puts you to sleep, that's a good thing.
Kathy Willens AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
7:17 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Putin Says Those Aren't Russian Forces In Crimea

Russian President Vladimir Putin during his news conference Tuesday.
Alexei Nikolsky AP

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 12:50 pm

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's David Greene speaks with 'New York Times' Moscow correspondent Steven Lee Myers

(We updated this post at 11:55 a.m. ET.)

Russian soldiers have not occupied government buildings and surrounded Ukrainian military bases on the Crimean Peninsula, Russian President Vladimir Putin insisted Tuesday during a news conference near Moscow at which he gave an account of recent events that contradicts reports from the ground.

Instead, he told reporters that the heavily armed men are "local self-defense forces."

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Europe
5:11 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Russian Troops Near Ukraine Ordered Back To Their Bases

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 8:04 am

Vladimir Putin orders tens of thousands of troops in military exercises near Ukraine to pull back. Thousands of Russian servicemen control border crossings and block military bases inside Crimea.

NPR Story
5:02 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Millennials To Bear The Burden Of Boomer's Social Safety Net

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 8:04 am

There is a big demographic shift underway and it's reshaping the U.S. David Greene talks to Paul Taylor about his book, The Next America. He's the executive vice president at the Pew Research Center.

Business
5:02 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Arby's Buys Pharell William's Grammy Hat For $44,000

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 8:04 am

The hat inspired jokes and was even compared to Arby's logo. Williams put the hat up for auction on eBay to raise funds for his nonprofit organization.

Business
5:02 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Singapore Is Now The World's Most Expensive City

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 8:04 am

Singapore bumped Tokyo from the top spot and beat out Paris, London and Hong Kong because of its high cost of living. The report was released by the Economist Intelligence Unit.

NPR Story
5:02 am
Tue March 4, 2014

When It Comes To Vaccines, Science Can Run Into A Brick Wall

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 8:04 am

The public health community has been trying for years to debunk the spurious connection people have been making between vaccines and autism. Have the messages been backfiring?

NPR Story
5:02 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Russian Troops Pullback From Ukraine Border, Remain In Crimea

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 8:04 am

David Greene gets the latest on Russia's military moves in Ukraine from Steven Lee Myers of The New York Times. Russia portrays the Kiev government as rabid nationalists threatening ethnic Russians.

NPR Story
5:02 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Syria Falls Behind Destroying Its Chemical Weapons

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 8:04 am

Linda Wertheimer gets a progress report on Syria's disposal of chemical weapons from Amy Smithson, an expert at the Center for Non-Proliferation Studies.

NPR Story
5:02 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Russia Maintains Grip On Ukraine's Crimean Peninsula

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 1:57 pm

As Russia strengthens its military control over Crimea, what options and obligations do the U.S. and its NATO allies have to protect Ukraine? David Greene talks to retired Adm. James Stavridis.

NPR Story
5:02 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Sarah Dooley Releases Debut Album 'Stupid Things'

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 9:35 am

Dooley became a campus celebrity as an undergraduate at Columbia University. She won over Internet critics with a comedy Web series. She combines sweetness and irony in some irreverent lyrics.

The Salt
3:50 am
Tue March 4, 2014

In The New Globalized Diet, Wheat, Soy And Palm Oil Rule

The world is increasingly relying on a few dozen megacrops, like wheat and potatoes, for survival. Above, a wheat field in Arkansas.
Danny Johnston AP

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 9:21 am

These days you can fly to far corners of the world and eat pretty much the same food you can get back home. There's pizza in China and sushi in Ethiopia.

A new scientific study shows that something similar is true of the crops that farmers grow. Increasingly, there's a standard global diet, and the human race is depending more and more on a handful of major crops for much of its food.

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Movie Interviews
3:49 am
Tue March 4, 2014

A Psychological Game Of Casting For 'The Grand Budapest Hotel'

Ralph Fiennes portrays concierge Monsieur Gustave in The Grand Budapest Hotel, the actor' first project with director Wes Anderson.
Bob Yeoman Courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 9:34 am

Watching Wes Anderson's films can often feel like a tumble down a rabbit hole. With the opening credits comes entry into a world that's both weird and wonderful. The writer and director of movies like Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums and Moonrise Kingdom has long had a point of view that is completely original — even dating back to the fifth grade, when he and a friend dramatized a Kenny Rogers album.

"We built quite a nice set," Anderson recalls. "We just performed the whole album of The Gambler with puppets playing instruments."

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The Salt
3:48 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Europe Tells U.S. To Lay Off Brie And Get Its Own Cheese Names

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 9:19 am

What's in a name? It's an age-old question Juliet once asked Romeo in Shakespeare's famed play.

Today, it's a serious question between the U.S. and the European Union, which has said it wants U.S. food makers to stop using European names.

But depending on what food you're talking about, a name could be a lot, says Kyle Cherek, the producer and host of a TV show called Wisconsin Foodie.

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Author Interviews
3:48 am
Tue March 4, 2014

When War-Torn Rubble Met Royal Imagination, 'Paris Became Paris'

Le Pont Neuf, shown here in an 18th-century painting by Nicolas-Jean-Baptiste Raguenet, was completed in 1606 by Henry IV. The bridge's construction kicked off the reinvention of Paris in the 17th century. Today, it's the oldest standing bridge across the Seine.
Public Domain

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 8:04 am

Today, Paris is a city of light and romance, full of broad avenues, picturesque bridges and countless tourists visiting to soak in its charms.

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The Two-Way
9:00 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

Baseball Tests Out Its Expanded Replay System

A play involving Toronto Blue Jays' Jared Goedert was the first to be reviewed under baseball's extended replay rules.
Gene J. Puskar AP

Major League Baseball debuted its expanded replay system on Monday and all three calls challenged ended up being upheld by another umpire looking at a screen in a satellite truck.

The AP reports:

"The first test came at 3:06 p.m. EST in Fort Myers, Fla., after first base umpire Fieldin Culbreth ruled Toronto shortstop Munenori Kawasaki's throw pulled Jared Goedert off the bag in the sixth inning. ...

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Commentary
8:18 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

Modern Mardi Gras Is Fun For The Whole(some) Family

Paradegoers yell for beads from float-riders in the Tucks Mardi Gras parade in New Orleans on Saturday. Mardi Gras is the city's biggest holiday, starting two weeks before Fat Tuesday and culminating with a long weekend crammed with parades. But there's a family-friendly side to this notoriously drunken party.
Bill Haber AP

It's Mardi Gras in New Orleans, and I'm going with my kids.

"What?" you may ask. "That festival of drunken debauchery?"

That's where you're wrong. For the fourth year in a row, we were at the family-oriented, kid-friendly celebration that's joyous, musical, raucous — and entirely legal.

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Code Switch
7:44 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

A Colorful Night At The Oscars. More Of The Same To Come?

The Mexico-born, Kenyan actress Lupita Nyong'o was one of several artists of color to collect awards during Sunday's Oscar ceremony. She won the accolade for best supporting actress.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

It might have been the most diverse Academy Awards telecast in recent memory.

Sunday night's broadcast was capped by British director Steve McQueen accepting a best picture Oscar for his film 12 Years a Slave — the first film directed by a black man to earn that honor. His emotional acceptance speech was dedicated to "all of the people who endured slavery and the 21 million people who still suffer slavery today."

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