World

NPR Story
5:03 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

Is Banning Doping The Right Choice For Major League Sports?

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 5:23 pm

Weekends on All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden interviews sportswriter Justice B. Hill about how performance-enhancing drugs affect major league sports, and what the league can do about them. Hill says the best option is to stop banning steroids and other drugs, and instead legalize and regulate them.

NPR Story
5:03 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

South Boston Transformed In Whitey Bulger's Absence

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 5:23 pm

When the FBI brought reputed mob boss James "Whitey" Bulger back to his old stomping ground of South Boston to be tried in federal court after 16 years on the lam, he must have done a double take. The neighborhood that Bulger is accused of terrorizing with murders and extortion is booming. This story originally aired on All Things Considered on July 18, 2013.

The Record
4:33 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

Hip-Hop Turns 40

DJ Kool Herc hosted a party in the South Bronx in 1973 that is credited with kick-starting hip-hop.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 6:09 pm

Today marks the 40th anniversary of the day Clive "Kool Herc" Campbell threw his first party in the function room of 1520 Sedgwick Ave in the South Bronx. While that Kool Herc back-to-school party marks the official beginnings of the global culture we call hip-hop, what the mainstream media at large now calls "hip-hop" is a far cry from the creative culture that emerged following the gang truce between the warring tribes of the South Bronx. When most people say "hip-hop" what they're actually talking about is rap.

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Author Interviews
3:39 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

'Dressing Constitutionally': When Fashion And Laws Collide

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 10:19 am

How short is too short, according to the law? Wardrobe choices, or lack thereof, raise all sorts of issues — from First Amendment concerns to questions of equality, sexuality and control.

Ruthann Robson's new book, Dressing Constitutionally Hierarchy, Sexuality, and Democracy from Our Hairstyles to Our Shoes, examines anecdotes throughout history demonstrating the ways fashion and laws can conflict or influence one another. Robinson talks with Jacki Lyden, host of weekends on All Things Considered, about some of those examples.

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Remembrances
3:02 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

How A Massive Power Outage Sent People Out In The Street

The New York City skyline is mostly dark in this photo of the 2003 blackout that hit U.S. and Canadian cities.
Frank Franklin II AP

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 12:38 pm

On Aug. 14, 2003, a series of cascading power failures led to a blackout that spread across the Northeast and as far west as Ohio. Some 50 million people were affected, and the power outages lasted up to 31 hours.

New York City was especially hard hit as the skyline went dark, and its 8 million residents coped without traffic lights or subways. We'll be exploring the lessons learned in the week ahead, but reporter Beth Fertig of member station WNYC reminds us what happened in her city.

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The Two-Way
12:31 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

Reactor Powered Up On First 'Made in India' Nuclear Sub

A Russian Akula-class sub in Brest harbor, western France, in 2004. The INS Arihant is said to be based on this Cold War design.
Fred Tanneau AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 12:44 pm

India has activated the reactor aboard the INS Arihant, believed to be the first nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine designed and built outside the Cold War "nuclear club."

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh called the event a "giant stride in ... our indigenous technological capabilities."

It's the first nuclear-powered submarine built in India and the first such vessel constructed by a country other than the United States, U.K., France, Russia or China.

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The Two-Way
11:25 am
Sun August 11, 2013

Family Rescued In Pacific After Sailing 'Where God Led Us'

The Gastonguays hoped to reach the vast archipelago nation of Kiribati, part of which is shown in this 2001 photo.
Torsten Blackwood AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 2:59 pm

A leap of faith that sent an Arizona family bound for the South Pacific in a sailboat has returned them in an airplane after a harrowing ordeal at sea that saw them adrift and nearly out of food in one of the remotest stretches of ocean on the planet.

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The Two-Way
9:28 am
Sun August 11, 2013

Israel OKs New Settlement Construction In West Bank

Chief Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erakat speaks to the media with Israel's chief negotiator and Justice Minister Tzipi Livni (left) and Secretary of State John Kerry in Washington on July 30.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 8:20 am

Israel's housing minister has given the green light to build 1,200 apartments in Jewish settlements in the West Bank, complicating newly revived peace talks with the Palestinians.

The decision comes as the two sides prepare for a second round of talks in Jerusalem after a high-level meeting in Washington, D.C., on July 31 — the first in five years.

The Associated Press writes:

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NPR Story
6:28 am
Sun August 11, 2013

Sending Poetry To Mars

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 2:09 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now, to a story I'll do entirely in haiku, so bear with me. And just in case you need a primmer: just three lines of verse. Syllables are what counts here - five, seven, then five. For the last few months, scientists have collected haikus meant for Mars. Thousands of poets, pros and amateurs alike, submitted their work. The public then picked their favorite Mars haikus. We are fans of these, by Anonymous.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: (Reading) Mars, oh. Do forgive. We never meant to obstruct Your view of Venus.

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NPR Story
6:28 am
Sun August 11, 2013

With Ice Cubes, The Larger The Better

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 2:09 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. It is August. Chances are where you are it's hot. So, maybe you want a drink to cool off. Will it be fruity or fizzy, maybe boozy? Whatever it is, Dan Pashman, host of the Sporkful podcast, thinks you may be overlooking one key ingredient: the ice. He joins us now from our New York studios. Hey Dan.

DAN PASHMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Rachel.

MARTIN: So, ice. This seems like a fairly forgettable part of a beverage experience. You say, no. Why?

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NPR Story
6:28 am
Sun August 11, 2013

The Great Stories Happening In Baseball

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 2:09 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPORTS THEME MUSIC)

MARTIN: This past week, the Yankees' Alex Rodriguez held a press conference. This was just after he'd been suspended by baseball for charges of using performance-enhancing drugs. There were a lot of tough questions about whether he'll ever play baseball again. And A-Rod made a valiant effort to deflect such questions.

NPR's Mike Pesca joins us now to focus on one of those deflections. Hey, Mike.

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NPR Story
6:28 am
Sun August 11, 2013

A Powerball Winner Keeps His Feet On The Ground

Brad Duke won $220 million in the lottery in 2005. In this Weekend Edition's Sunday Conversation, host Rachel Martin asks Duke how he kept his money, his friends and his grip on reality.

Author Interviews
5:20 am
Sun August 11, 2013

The Beauty And Calm Of 'Thinking In Numbers'

Inga Ivanova iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 2:09 pm

There are numbers all around us. They are in every word we speak or write, and in the passage of time. Everything in our world has a numeric foundation, but most of us don't see those numbers. It's different for Daniel Tammet. He's a savant with synesthesia, a condition that allows him to see beyond simple numerals — he experiences them.

Tammet drew attention around the world about a decade ago when he recited, from memory, the number pi. It took him five hours to call out 22,514 digits with no mistakes.

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Deceptive Cadence
5:19 am
Sun August 11, 2013

Chris Thile Looks Back To Bach

Chris Thile's new album, Sonatas and Partitas, draws from material written by Johann Sebastian Bach in the early 1700s.
Brantley Gutierrez Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 2:09 pm

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Music Interviews
5:19 am
Sun August 11, 2013

A Veteran Rock Photographer Takes A Turn At The Mic

Mark Seliger (third from left), former chief photographer for Rolling Stone, also leads the country-rock ensemble Rusty Truck.
Rodrigo Palma and Jordie Turner Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 2:09 pm

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Code Switch
5:13 am
Sun August 11, 2013

Amusement Parks And Jim Crow: MLK's Son Remembers

Martin Luther King Jr sits on a swing with his eldest daughter, Yolanda, and eldest son, Martin, at an amusement park he helped desegregate.
Courtesy of the King family

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 2:09 pm

In this three-part series, Karen Grigsby Bates talks with children of Medgar Evers, Viola Liuzzo and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to see how they've coped with the burden and privilege of their legacies.

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Keys To The Whole World: American Public Libraries
5:12 am
Sun August 11, 2013

At Libraries Across America, It's Game On

If a LEGO lion can take pride of place at the New York Public Library, why not video games in the reading rooms? The NYPLarcade program is a kind of book club for gamers, inviting participants to dive deep with discussions of strategy, game structure and more.
Bebeto Matthews AP

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 2:09 pm

There's a battle going down at the Sollers Point Branch of the Baltimore County Public Library system. It's a one-point game in the fourth quarter with only seconds left on the game clock. Huddled around a big screen in a small room, 10 or so teenagers cheer on their joystick-wielding buddies. The ball is snapped, the kick is up ... no good. It's wide right, and the crowd goes wild, trash talk flying.

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Sunday Puzzle
5:02 am
Sun August 11, 2013

Easy As ABC

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 2:09 pm

On-air challenge: Every answer is an anagram of a word that has the letters A-B-C in it.

Last week's challenge: Name a foreign make of automobile. Cross out several letters in its name. The remaining letters, reading in order from left to right, will spell a food that comes from the country where the car is made. What is the country, and what is the food?

Answer: Mitsubishi, sushi

Winner: Lindsy Schwantes of Waite Park, Minn.

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The Salt
4:55 am
Sun August 11, 2013

America, Are You Tough Enough To Drink Real Russian Kvas?

A man drinks fresh kvas, the ancient Russian fermented-bread drink, in Zvenigorod, 35 miles west of Moscow.
Dmitry Lovetsky AP

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 2:09 pm

While American kids stand in line for the ice cream truck on sweltering summer days, kids in Russia have historically queued up for something different: the kvas truck.

Kvas is a fermented grain drink, sort of like a barely alcoholic beer. And in the heat of the summer, it was served from a big barrel on wheels, with everyone lining up for their turn at the communal mug. It may sound like a far cry from rocket pops and ice cream sandwiches, but most Russians have fond memories.

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