World

The Picture Show
12:03 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

How To Draw Out Your Worst Fears

Pat, 66, fears losing her memory.
Courtesy of Julie Elman

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 2:25 pm

A few years ago, Julie Elman, an associate professor at Ohio University, was stuck in a creative rut. As a design educator and illustrator, most of her work was done on the computer. She wanted to begin a tangible project — remember those? — but didn't really know where to start.

Then she realized there was one emotion she was strangely preoccupied with: fear. "I thought fears would go away as we get older," she remembers thinking. "I'm in my 50s. Why do I still have fears?"

And that is how The Fear Project was born.

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NPR Story
12:02 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Summer Songs: Clarinetist Remakes 50 Cent

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 12:08 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now we continue our Summer Songs series. Gwen Thompkins, the host of Music Inside Out on WWNO in New Orleans, is introducing us to a handful of contemporary artists who've taken some old classics out for a new spin. This week, she tells us about an unlikely pairing with New Orleans favorite Michael White.

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NPR Story
12:02 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

A Family Tree That Includes Slaves — And Slave Owners

Andrea Stuart is also the author of The Rose of Martinique: A Life of Napoleon's Josephine.
Clara Molden Camera Press Redux

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:15 pm

Part of our summer reading series Island Reads, highlighting authors from the Caribbean

Andrea Stuart was curious about her family's history in Barbados. And through years of careful research, she found that her bloodline includes both slave owners and slaves. She has written about her own family, as well as a detailed history of slavery in the Caribbean, in her book Sugar in the Blood. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with Stuart about her family history, the moral complexity of slavery and finding roots in the past.

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NPR Story
12:02 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Is Democracy Finished In Egypt?

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 11:33 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. We start today in Egypt. Hundreds of people are dead. Thousands more are injured there. That's after the military staged an assault on the camps of protesters, targeting specifically the supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi. The military now has the country on lockdown and has declared a state of emergency, but members of the Muslim Brotherhood vow to continue protesting until Morsi is reinstated.

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Favorite Sessions
11:56 am
Thu August 15, 2013

The Current Presents: Valerie June

Valerie June performs live at The Current's studios in St. Paul, Minn.
Nate Ryan The Current

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 1:21 pm

Tennessee native Valerie June feels a deep connection — if not a responsibility — to her home state's musical traditions, as she points to pioneers such as Memphis Minnie, Elvis Presley and Booker T. Jones. "I have a lot to live up to, being from Memphis," she says.

While touring in support of her new album, Pushin' Against a Stone (co-written and produced by Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys), June recently stopped by The Current's studios to perform a few songs, including "You Can't Be Told."

Credits

  • Photos/Video: Nate Ryan
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First Listen
11:34 am
Thu August 15, 2013

First Listen: Rapsody, 'She Got Game'

Datpiff.com on August 20." href="/post/first-listen-rapsody-she-got-game" class="noexit lightbox">
Rapsody's She Got Game will be available as a free mixtape at Datpiff.com on August 20.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 12:19 pm

A young rapper from North Carolina, Rapsodydoesn't want to be labeled or limited as a woman in hip-hop; she wants you to know that she's as good as any of her male peers — and better than quite a few of them. With her newest project, She Got Game, Rapsody is in her own lane, one that skirts music industry norms for female musicians regardless of genre (read: bikinis, rescue fantasies, twerking).

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The Salt
10:57 am
Thu August 15, 2013

If You Liked That Wine, You Should've Put A Ring On It

Not just for single ladies:
Courtesy of Remy Martin

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 3:53 pm

Oh, Beyonce would be so proud.

Blurring the lines between jewelry and glassware, a Turkish art student has designed a set of rings made specifically for sniffing and sipping Remy Martin cognac and other adult beverages.

One ring perches a petite wineglass upon your finger. Another is a miniature snifter, attached to your hand — so you'll always be ready if you stumble upon some Robin Thicke limited edition V.S.O.P.

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The Two-Way
10:46 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Obama 'Strongly Condemns' Crackdown In Egypt

President Obama, speaking Thursday from the island of Martha's Vineyard, Mass., said the U.S. has canceled joint military exercises with Egypt.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 5:05 pm

  • President Obama's comments about the crisis in Egypt; Aug. 15, 2013

"The United States strongly condemns the steps that have been taken by Egypt's interim government" that have led to civilians "being killed in the streets," President Obama said Thursday from Martha's Vineyard, Mass., where he is vacationing with his family.

He called on Egypt's interim government to lift the state of emergency it has declared and said the U.S. has canceled joint military exercises with Egypt that had been scheduled for September.

"Our traditional cooperation cannot continue as usual while civilians are being killed in the streets," Obama said.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:13 am
Thu August 15, 2013

An American Maverick Turns The Symphony On Its Head

Charles Ives, better known as an insurance executive in his time, wrote innovative symphonies incorporating American folk and hymn tunes.
Corbis

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 12:22 pm

  • Jan Swafford Tells The Story of Composer Charles Ives And His Wife, Harmony

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Shots - Health News
10:01 am
Thu August 15, 2013

A Safety Checklist To Save Teen Athletes' Lives

Ray Copeland, a football coach at Bishop McGuinness High School, puts his players through a workout in Oklahoma City in 2007. As is often the case in much of the U.S., the first day of high school football practice that year began in a heat wave.
AP

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 8:03 am

For all the benefits of exercise and teamwork to the heart and head, high school athletes still lead the nation in athletics-related deaths. And it doesn't have to be that way, sports medicine specialists say.

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The Two-Way
9:48 am
Thu August 15, 2013

James Bond Parachutist At London Olympics Dies In Accident

Stuntman Mark Sutton, doubling for actor Daniel Craig (or, as James Bond) during the Opening Ceremony of the London Olympics last summer.
Ian Langsdon EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 5:41 pm

"The stuntman who parachuted into the London 2012 opening ceremony as James Bond has been killed in an accident," the BBC reports. "Mark Sutton, 42, from Surrey, died Wednesday while wingsuit flying near Martigny, Switzerland. Swiss police investigating the Briton's death said it appeared he had died after crashing into a ridge of rock."

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The Two-Way
9:41 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Wal-Mart Blames Economy And Payroll Taxes For Slowed Earnings

Don Emmert AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:23 pm

Wal-Mart is blaming depressed demand amid a still-shaky economy and a rise in payroll taxes for disappointing earnings in the quarter ending July 31.

The world's largest retailer said Thursday that its net income rose to $4.07 billion, barely above the $4.02 billion it earned in the same quarter last year.

According to Reuters, sales at U.S. stores that have been open for at least one year fell 0.3 percent.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
8:23 am
Thu August 15, 2013

College-Bound Kids And The Emotions of Primate Parents

A first-year student is greeted upon arrival at University College in Utrecht, Netherlands, on August 16, 2010.
Robin Utrecht AFP/Getty Images

Now that it's mid-August, thousands of families across the country are preparing for an emotional milestone: sending a child off to college for the first time.

So, this week's post is about the emotions parents of college-bound children feel, and what other primate parents may feel — or not — regarding separation from their children.

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The Two-Way
8:20 am
Thu August 15, 2013

VIDEO: 'Sideways Rocket Hop' By SpaceX Prototype

The "Grasshopper" during its hop into the air.
SpaceX

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 1:50 pm

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The Two-Way
7:42 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Book News: Slam Poet's 'OCD' Love Poem Makes Waves

Neil Hilborn performs "OCD" at the 2013 Rustbelt Poetry Slam.
YouTube

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:48 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Thu August 15, 2013

'Snow Hunters': A Beautiful Debut Novel Grounded In History

On the second page of his debut novel Snow Hunters, Paul Yoon vividly depicts the last moments before his protagonist Yohan is liberated from a prisoner of war camp on the Korean peninsula, "where there was always a wind that carried the smell of soil and sickness" from the animals at a nearby farm. Yohan is about to catch a boat to Brazil and start a new life as a Japanese tailor's apprentice – and as he rides away in a UN truck, he "shut his eyes and dreamed of castles."

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The Two-Way
6:38 am
Thu August 15, 2013

After Deaths Of Hundreds, More Bloodshed Feared In Egypt

Posters of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi lay amid the rubble of a protest camp in Cairo after Wednesday's crackdown by government forces.
Ahmed Assadi EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:30 pm

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Leila Fadel reports from Cairo

"It's difficult to see a path out of this crisis, at least not without more people dying."

That's how NPR's Cairo bureau chief, Leila Fadel, ended her Morning Edition report Thursday. After Wednesday's deadly crackdown by Egyptian troops on supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi — a crackdown that according to latest estimates left more than 500 people dead and 3,500 or so wounded — the fear is that there will be much more bloodshed.

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Middle East
5:24 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Violent Crackdown Spread Beyond Cairo

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:26 am

The deadly confrontations in Egypt on Wednesday were not limited to Cairo. To find out what happened in the Egyptian city of Alexandria, David Greene talks to Mohammed Abushaqra, a civil society advocate.

Middle East
5:24 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Egypt Is Under A State Of Emergency

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:24 am

It was perhaps the bloodiest day in Egypt since the uprising in 2011. Security forces on Wednesday launched a major operation to clear supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi from two sit-in camps in Cairo but the violence quickly spread to other parts of the city.

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