World

Newport Jazz Festival
5:56 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Jon Batiste And Stay Human, Live In Concert: Newport Jazz 2013

Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
5:51 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Boz Scaggs On Piano Jazz

Boz Scaggs.
Courtesy of the artist

On this episode of Piano Jazz, singer-songwriter and guitarist Boz Scaggs performs a few standards in a program that originally aired in 2004.

Scaggs met future rock star and classic-rock staple Steve Miller while the two were attending prep school in Texas. In 1959, Skaggs joined a group headed by Miller, beginning a musical association that lasted, on and off, into the late '60s.

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Newport Jazz Festival
5:38 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Live In Concert: Newport Jazz 2013

Adam Kissick for NPR
  • Dirty Dozen Brass Band At Newport

One of the original new-school New Orleans brass bands, a Dirty Dozen show guarantees a good time. This year actually marks three dozen years since the first incarnation of the group coalesced to resurrect a then-disappearing tradition — and infuse it with both bebop and funk. As with many a show since '77, there was dancing and handkerchief-waving aplenty, and several original members were present to anchor the proceedings.

Personnel

  • Roger Hayward Lewis, baritone and soprano saxophone
  • Kevin Harris, tenor saxophone
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Newport Jazz Festival
5:36 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Jim Hall Trio With Julian Lage, Live In Concert: Newport Jazz 2013

The Jim Hall Trio with Julian Lage performs at the 2013 Newport Jazz Festival.
Adam Kissick NPR

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 12:44 pm

One of the finest guitar players in jazz history — who made all those classic records with Sonny Rollins, Bill Evans, Ron Carter and so on — is still at it at age 82. Fittingly, Jim Hall's rhythm section at Newport is top-shelf international caliber: Scott Colley (bass) and Lewis Nash (drums). And Julian Lage, a much younger guitar phenom, joined in a cross-generational confab of guitar heroes.

Personnel

  • Jim Hall, guitar
  • Scott Colley, bass
  • Lewis Nash, drums
  • Julian Lage, guitar

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The Two-Way
5:29 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

In Baseball, Punishments Often Come With An Asterisk

Despite already being in the Hall of Fame, New York Yankees legend Mickey Mantle was banned from baseball in 1983, for his work for a casino. He was reinstated in 1985. MLB suspended Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez for 211 regular season games Monday.
AP

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 8:01 pm

By suspending New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez for 211 regular-season games — through the end of the 2014 regular season — Major League Baseball stopped short of the lifetime ban that had been threatened.

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NPR Story
5:11 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Amazon CEO To Buy 'Washington Post' And Sister Papers

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 6:24 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The man who pushed the book publishing industry into the digital age is now buying one of the country's most storied newspaper companies. Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon.com, is acquiring The Washington Post and its small sister papers. The news broke after the markets closed today. NPR's David Folkenflik covers the newspaper industry, and he joins me now. And, David, this was, I think, the best-kept secret in Washington. Tell us some details of this transaction and how it came about.

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Code Switch
5:10 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

The Racial Backdrop Of The Tawana Brawley Case

Tawana Brawley and the Rev. Al Sharpton at a protest in 1988.
Neil Brake AP

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 6:32 pm

As our colleagues at The Two-Way reported, Tawana Brawley, the central figure in one of the most bizarre and racially polarizing cases in New York City's recent history, has begun to pay part of the more than $430,000 judgment against her.

Brawley accused a group of men of having raped her repeatedly. Among those she accused were several police officers and a prosecutor.

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The Two-Way
4:52 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

'Washington Post' To Be Sold To Amazon's Jeff Bezos

View of the front page of the October 30, 2009 edition of The Washington Post.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 10:03 am

The Washington Post Co. will sell its flagship newspaper and one of the most respected news organizations in the country to Amazon.com founder Jeffrey P. Bezos, the company announced in a press release. The Post has been a family-owned business for four generations.

Amazon, the company said, will play no role in the purchase. Bezos is making the purchase personally.

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Space
4:47 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Space Robot Designed As Companion For Japanese Astronaut

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 6:24 pm

Japan has launched a humanoid robot bound for the International Space Station to keep one of its astronauts company.

World
4:47 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Interpol Asks For Help Tracking Escaped Al-Qaida Inmates

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 6:24 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Just after the State Department announced it would close those diplomatic missions came another alert, this one from Interpol, the global police organization. Interpol is asking for help tracking hundreds of terrorism suspects who've escaped from prisons in Iraq, Pakistan and Libya over the past month. NPR's counterterrorism correspondent Dina Temple-Raston has been following the story and she joins me now.

And Dina, what's the connection between these two security alerts, one from Interpol and the other from the State Department?

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World
4:47 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Ambassadors Question Decision To Close Mideast Embassies

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 6:24 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Nineteen U.S. embassies and consulates in the Middle East and Africa will stay closed for the rest of the week. The State Department says that it's operating out of an abundance of caution amid intelligence reports about the possibility of terrorist attacks. And, as NPR's Michele Kelemen reports, it's not clear when the facilities will reopen.

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Games & Humor
4:47 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Zombie Video Game Draws Inspiration From Real Fungus

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 6:59 pm

The Last of Us is a new survival horror video game. It follows a character named Joel as he fights off hostile humans and zombie-like creatures. The game was inspired by a BBC show on the scary effects of a fungus. (This piece initially aired July 9, 2013, on Morning Edition).

Food
4:47 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Lab-Grown Beef Passes Ethical But Not Taste Tests

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 6:24 pm

Is it possible that, one day, beef production will not require grazing land, feed lots or slaughterhouses? In Britain, burgers made from cow stem cells were put to the taste test on Monday.

Monkey See
4:34 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Still Not Ginger: In Which We Express Cautious Excitement About Peter Capaldi

For hardcore Doctor Who fans, the show is like a cranky elderly relative. You love it because it's basically family. But you don't always like it. (Steven Moffat ... grumble grumble ... female characters ... grumble grumble ... what the hell did you do to River Song grumble grumble ...)

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The Salt
4:00 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Long Awaited Lab-Grown Burger Is Unveiled In London

Scientists say commercial production of cultured beef could begin within 10 to 20 years.
David Parry / PA Wire

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 5:04 pm

After three months, $330,000 and a high-profile media blitz, the world's first hamburger grown in a lab made its worldwide debut Monday.

The unveiling of "cultured beef," as the burger is branded, was a production worthy of the Food Network era, complete with chatty host, live-streamed video, hand-picked taste testers, a top London chef and an eager audience (made up mostly of journalists). Rarely has a single food gotten such star treatment.

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Book Reviews
3:54 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Wandering Appetites: Hunting The Elusive Noodle

Jennifer Lin-Liu is a chef at Black Sesame Kitchen, her restaurant and cooking school in Beijing. She is also the author of Serve the People.
Lucy Cavender Courtesy Riverhead Books

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 6:24 pm

On the Noodle Road is one attempt to answer an old chestnut: Did Marco Polo really bring noodles from China to Italy? If not, where did they really come from? Or — to put it another way — from what point along the storied byways of the Silk Road did that humble paste of flour and water first spring into its multifarious existence?

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Shots - Health News
3:38 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Data Dive Finds Doctors For Rent

What's up, doc?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 7:04 am

Silly me. I thought "rent-seeking" was something only landlords did.

But economists have their own way of looking at the world. To them, rent-seeking is a term for describing how someone snags a bigger share of a pie rather than making a pie bigger, as the venerable Economist explains it.

So, a drugmaker can be seen as a rent-seeker if it cajoles doctors to prescribe more of a particular brand of medicine at the expense of a rival pharmaceutical company's wares.

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All Tech Considered
3:36 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

The Hackable Japanese Toilet Comes With An App To Track Poop

A promotion for the My Satis app.
My Satis

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 3:45 pm

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The Two-Way
2:55 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Ex-Turkish Military Chief Gets Life In Prison For Coup Plot

Protesters wave posters of Turkey's first president, Kemal Ataturk, before a police barricade outside the Silivri jail complex in Silivri, Turkey, on Monday. Scores of people were sentenced for their roles in what's being dubbed the Ergenekon plot.
AP

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:15 pm

Turkey's former military chief was sentenced to life in prison and scores of others were given long sentences Monday for plotting against the government of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

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World Cafe
2:00 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Next: Rose Windows

Rose Windows.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 5:46 pm

Rose Windows' debut album, The Sun Dogs, is steeped in '60s classic rock, recalling the heavy organ sounds of The Doors and the folk-infused flutes of Traffic. Formed in 2010 by songwriter Chris Cheveyo, the Seattle septet signed a label deal earlier this year, then put together an album that's layered with Middle Eastern influences.

Hear two songs from The Sun Dogs, a mellow combination of psychedelic folk and blues-rock instrumentation.

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