World

Africa
4:47 pm
Wed December 25, 2013

Clashes Continue In South Sudan Despite Calls For Cease-Fire

South Sudanese troops have retaken the flashpoint town of Bor, north of the capital Juba.
James Akena Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 10:41 am

It was a somber Christmas day in South Sudan. Despite an appeal for a Christmas cease-fire from the African Union, government soldiers and rebels clashed in an oil-rich part of the country.

At a church in the capital of Juba, President Salva Kiir called for peace and unity. Even the leader's choice of clothing — traditional robes instead of army fatigues — seemed to signal that he wants to move past the violence.

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Afghanistan
4:47 pm
Wed December 25, 2013

NATO Prepares To Leave Afghanistan, And No U.S. Security Deal Yet

A look back and a look ahead as NATO prepares for the final year of its mission in Afghanistan. This year saw several major events as Afghan forces took responsibility for security and the U.S. and Afghanistan came close, but have so far failed to ink a security deal to keep U.S. forces in Afghanistan after the NATO mission ends next year.

Movies
4:47 pm
Wed December 25, 2013

How Close Did 'Captain Philips' Get To The Real Life Piracy Tale?

The film Captain Phillips is "based on a true story" of the 2009 hijacking of an American ship by Somali pirates. But how faithfully does the movie capture real events? Robert Siegel puts that question to Colin Freeman, chief foreign correspondent with Britain's Sunday Telegraph. Freeman covered the 2009 incident and has himself been kidnapped by Somali pirates.

World
4:47 pm
Wed December 25, 2013

Christmas Messages From Around The World

Leaders and notable figures across the world offered up Christmas messages Wednesday. We hear holiday greetings from Pope Francis, President Obama and former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

Parallels
4:47 pm
Wed December 25, 2013

Instead Of Sending Students Abroad, Qatar Imports U.S. Colleges

A man walks along a pathway at the Texas A&M University campus in Doha, Qatar.
Osama Faisal AP

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 10:53 pm

In Qatar's rapid race to modernity, the emirate has created a distinctive approach to educating its young: It has effectively imported a host of American universities.

Dr. Sheikha Aisha bint Faleh bin Nasser Al-Thani, a member of Qatar's ruling family, sits on the Supreme Education Council and owns a few independent schools. For her own children, she wanted a top-flight college education. Her sons were educated in Britain.

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Parallels
3:04 pm
Wed December 25, 2013

NAFTA Opened Continent For Some Canadian Companies

The Bombardier Challenger 300 is one of the most popular midsize business jets in production. Canada-based Bombardier has boomed in the two decades since the North American Free Trade Agreement was signed.
Todd Williamson AP

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 8:27 pm

Six brand new Challenger corporate jets sit on a showroom floor waiting to be picked up here at the Bombardier Aerospace plant on the outskirts of Montreal. Manager Frank Richie watches as technicians polish the gleaming aircraft and make last-minute adjustments. Each one is personalized, from the leather trim inside to the fancy paint job on its exterior.

Through a side door, you enter an enormous assembly line for more than a dozen other Challenger jets. The factory floor spans nearly 900,000 square feet.

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NPR Story
2:41 pm
Wed December 25, 2013

Ski Resorts Looking To Profit From China's Growing Middle Class

Aspen Skiing Company is one resort that is trying to profit from China's growing middle class by wooing them to its slopes. (Aspen Skiing Company)

The Chinese middle class is growing, and so is their disposable income.

Colorado’s ski resorts are trying some new tactics to attract Chinese tourists to the slopes. Marci Krivonen of Aspen Public Radio reports.

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NPR Story
2:41 pm
Wed December 25, 2013

The Storyteller Behind 'A Christmas Story'

Flick's tongue gets stuck to a pole after agreeing to a triple-dog-dare. (Screenshot/"A Christmas Story")

This Christmas, we take a look back at the life of a storyteller whose most famous movie is likely playing non-stop this holiday: “A Christmas Story.”

The late radio host, Jean Shepherd, wrote and narrated the film inspired by his own childhood.

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NPR Story
2:41 pm
Wed December 25, 2013

Tens Of Thousands In Canada Still Without Power

Toronto in the aftermath of the storm an ice storm downed trees and brought single digit temperatures to Canada and parts of Michigan, Vermont and Maine(Roozbeh Rokni/Flickr)

From Ontario to Nova Scotia, tens of thousands of people are still without power in Canada after a weekend ice storm that took down trees and power lines.

Temperatures have dipped into the single digits and at least five people are dead, two of them from carbon monoxide poisoning after resorting to burning charcoal or propane to stay warm.

The CBC’s John Northcott joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the latest on the storm’s aftermath.

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NPR Story
2:41 pm
Wed December 25, 2013

Singing Nuns From Missouri Top Billboard Chart

In Missouri, a group of nuns called the Benedictines of Mary, Queen of the Apostles, recorded an album that topped Billboard’s traditional classical charts for weeks over the summer when it was first released…and they couldn’t care less.

“These CDs are absolutely non-essential to our life, our life of prayer,” Mother Cecilia, the prioress, said. “If we hadn’t recorded, or if we don’t record again, it really wouldn’t have any bearing, any effect on our life.”

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NPR Story
2:41 pm
Wed December 25, 2013

Fund Set Up For Victims Of Bangladesh Factory Collapse

Bangladeshi garment worker Laboni, who worked at the Rana Plaza, is assisted by her husband in puttng on herprosthetic hand at a hospital in Dhaka November 23, 2013. A $40 million fund is being created to compensate the injured and victims' families. (Munir Uz Zaman/AFP/Getty Images)

The April collapse of the Rana Plaza factory building killed more than 1,100 workers and injured hundreds more.

To help them now, some major retailers and labor groups and the government in Bangladesh are helping to create an estimated $40 million fund to compensate the injured and the families of the victims.

The BBC’s Anbarasan Ethirajan, who covered the Rana Plaza collapse, joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the fund.

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NPR Story
2:40 pm
Wed December 25, 2013

Gloria Estefan's Grammy Nominated Spin On 'The Standards'

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 5:15 pm

Miami songstress Gloria Estefan has been nominated for a Grammy for Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album.

Her album, “The Standards“ features her take on not only hits from the Great American Songbook, but also Brazilian and Argentinean classics as well.

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NPR Story
2:40 pm
Wed December 25, 2013

Toys Abound, Batteries Needed

Americans buy and throw away billions of batteries each year. (tomblois/Flickr)

If there are Hot Wheels, Furby Booms, or Lionel train sets under the tree this year, you have probably stocked up on batteries to power them.

Americans buy – and throw out – billions of batteries each year.

Philip E. Ross of IEEE Spectrum joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to explain the difference between AA and AAA batteries, and advises when to use rechargeable batteries.

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The Two-Way
1:59 pm
Wed December 25, 2013

In Christmas Message, Snowden Tells Britons 'Privacy Matters'

Former NSA contractor Edward Snowden in an address televised Wednesday on Britain's Channel 4.
Screengrab/Channel 4

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 2:14 am

Former NSA contractor Edward Snowden had a Christmas Day warning for Britons: "A child born today will grow up with no conception of privacy at all."

Britain's Channel 4 televised Snowden's short address as the network's "Alternative Christmas Message," an annual address delivered by a public figure that mimics the style of Queen Elizabeth's Royal Christmas Message. You can watch the full 1:43 video at Channel 4's website.

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Shots - Health News
1:03 pm
Wed December 25, 2013

Diabetes Gene Common In Latinos Has Ancient Roots

The skull of a female Neanderthal, who lived about 50,000 years ago, is displayed at the Natural History Museum in London.
Rick Findler/Barcroft Media Landov

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 11:02 am

When it comes to the rising prevalence of Type 2 diabetes, there are many factors to blame.

Diet and exercise sit somewhere at the top of the list. But the genes that some of us inherit from Mom and Dad also help determine whether we develop the disease, and how early it crops up.

Now an international team of scientists have identified mutations in a gene that suggests an explanation for why Latinos are almost twice as likely to develop Type 2 diabetes as Caucasians and African-Americans.

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The Thistle & Shamrock
12:03 pm
Wed December 25, 2013

The Thistle And Shamrock: A Festive Celtic Celebration

Archie Fisher.
Courtesy of the artist

Join Fiona Ritchie to celebrate the season by exploring festive songs, carols and dances from traditions old and new.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

World Cafe
11:52 am
Wed December 25, 2013

Latin Roots: A Puerto Rican Christmas

Some of the traditional instruments played during Puerto Rican caroling.

Musician, record producer and writer Rachel Faro visits World Cafe for part two of this week's special holiday edition of Latin Roots. During Wednesday's episode, Faro discusses Christmas celebrations in Puerto Rico and how they differ from the holiday traditions in the Puerto Rican communities of New York. One of the songs she plays, by Willie Colon, is a classic that brings traditional music from the island to the big city.

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World Cafe
11:39 am
Wed December 25, 2013

The Fab Four: A Beatles Cover Band On World Cafe

The Fab Four.
Courtesy of the artist

World Cafe's special Christmas Day episode continues with The Fab Four, a California-based band of dedicated Beatles impersonators. The group takes on many elements of the influential English band, from sporting mop-tops to covering Sgt. Pepper and beyond.

This year, The Fab Four released Hark!, which features mash-ups of Christmas classics and Beatles favorites. The band members join host David Dye in the WXPN studios to talk about the record.

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World Cafe
11:34 am
Wed December 25, 2013

Nick Lowe On World Cafe

Nick Lowe.
Courtesy of the artist

Our guest for a special Christmas Day episode of World Cafe, Nick Lowe, has been making records since the 1970s. With beginnings as a rocker, Lowe has since developed a new following for his sly, country-tinged records. His new Christmas album, Quality Street: A Seasonal Selection for All the Family, fits squarely into that category. In addition to performing a live set, the English musician discusses how he gets into the Christmas spirit.

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This Is NPR
11:28 am
Wed December 25, 2013

ALL THE VIDEOS: Holiday Edition

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