World

Television
5:06 pm
Sun December 8, 2013

The Intended Madness Of Comic Eric Andre's 'Anti-Talk Show'

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 6:12 pm

Late-night comedy show hosts are known for opening their programs in a certain style. David Letterman takes to the stage with a wave and a smile. Jay Leno comes out and shakes hands with the audience.

Eric Andre takes quite a different approach: flying into an uncontrollable rage as soon as the band plays him on and smashing nearly everything on the set.

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Music Interviews
5:06 pm
Sun December 8, 2013

Why Would Nick Lowe Make A Christmas Album? Ask Nick Lowe

Nick Lowe's Quality Street: A Seasonal Selection for All the Family is an album of original holiday songs and some reworked classics.
Zoran Orlic Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 6:12 pm

Not long ago, Nick Lowe was approached by his American record label about releasing a Christmas album. The esteemed UK songwriter, who gave the world "(What's So Funny 'Bout) Peace, Love, and Understanding" and "Cruel to Be Kind," says the idea seemed laughable.

"But I was confused by how snooty I felt when they asked me about doing it," Lowe says. "I think it's a Brit thing, really: Making Christmas records is seen as a not very cool thing to do. And I thinkg it's all bound up with strange ideas from the 1960s, about selling out and things like that."

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Business
5:06 pm
Sun December 8, 2013

How NAFTA Drove The Auto Industry South

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 6:12 pm

President Bill Clinton signed the North American Free Trade Agreement into law 20 years ago on Dec. 8, 1993. One of the clear beneficiaries over the past two decades has been the Mexican automobile industry.

Africa
5:06 pm
Sun December 8, 2013

South Africa Holds Mandela In Mind As It Gathers In Prayer

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 6:12 pm

It has been National Day of Prayer and reflection in South Africa as the nation pays tribute to the late Nelson Mandela. Host Arun Rath speaks with NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the day, and how white South Africans are reacting to the death of Mandela.

The Two-Way
4:43 pm
Sun December 8, 2013

Lawmaker Says Snowden May Testify Before EU Parliament

Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian.
Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Mon December 9, 2013 12:54 pm

A European lawmaker says former NSA contractor Edward Snowden is set to testify before a civil liberties committee of the European Parliament later this month.

Snowden, of course, is expected to talk about the surveillance activities of United States' National Security Agency. Reporter Teri Schultz filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
3:17 pm
Sun December 8, 2013

Report Details ATF's Use Of Mentally Disabled In Gun Stings

The seal of the US Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives photographed in 2007.
AFP/Getty Images

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel just published a blockbuster story that's today's must read: Based on court records, police reports and dozens of interviews, the paper details how the ATF used "rogue" tactics — including providing underage youths with alcohol and allowing them to smoke pot — to run storefront gun and drug stings across the country.

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The Two-Way
12:42 pm
Sun December 8, 2013

In Kiev, Protesters Topple Statue Of Vladimir Lenin

Ukrainians break a monument of Vladimir Lenin in center Kiev, Ukraine, on Sunday.
Efrem Lukatsky AP

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 3:06 pm

Anti-government protesters in the Ukrainian capital of Kiev have toppled a statue of Bolshevik leader Vladimir Lenin.

Instagram user Arthur_potachik posted this video of the moment:

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The Two-Way
8:10 am
Sun December 8, 2013

Countering China, S. Korea Expands Its Own Air Defense Zone

Japanese Coast Guard vessels sail near a group of disputed islands called Diaoyu by China and Senkaku by Japan.
Emily Wang AP

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 2:19 pm

Another diplomatic shot was fired in the spate unfolding over uninhabited islands in the East China Sea on Sunday: Countering China, South Korea announced that it was expanding its air defense zone to partially cover some of the same area China laid claim to in November.

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Africa
7:58 am
Sun December 8, 2013

South Africans Celebrate Mandela On National Day Of Prayer

A sea of tributes grows outside the home of former President Nelson Mandela in Johannesburg, South Africa, on Sunday.
Matt Dunham AP

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 3:53 pm

The day of prayer and reflection for Nelson Mandela began Sunday morning at the African Gospel Church in Orlando, an area of Soweto, Mandela's hometown.

The anti-apartheid icon died Thursday night of complications from a lung infection. He was 95 years old.

Fleur Nomthandazo has been coming to this church, her great-grandfather's church, every Sunday for the past six months to pray for Nelson Mandela's recovery. Today, she's here to pray for his family.

"We never cry when somebody dies," Nomthandazo says. "We celebrate the life that they lived."

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The Sunday Conversation
7:58 am
Sun December 8, 2013

Husband Finding Peace After A Terrorist Attack

David Harris-Gershon wrote a book about meeting Mohammad Odeh's family, What Do You Buy the Children of the Terrorist who Tried to Kill Your Wife?
Larry Roberts Post-Gazette

Originally published on Sun December 15, 2013 10:58 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Several years ago, David Harris-Gershon and his wife Jamie were studying in Israel, where they'd constructed their daily life in ways they hoped would protect them from a terrorist attack. They weren't so fortunate.

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Law
7:58 am
Sun December 8, 2013

Police Chiefs Propose Reforms To Prevent Wrong Convictions

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 11:50 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The advancement of DNA evidence over the past few years has generated a wave of exonerations around the country. Legal advocacy groups have been working to reduce the number of wrongful convictions for a long time, but now a group of law enforcement leaders are joining the cause.

Last week, the International Association of Police Chiefs, or IAPC, issued a series of recommendations, including new guidelines for photo lineups, the use of informants and interviewing witnesses.

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Politics
7:58 am
Sun December 8, 2013

Congress Aims For The Modest Bargain

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 11:50 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News, I'm Rachel Martin.

The Senate comes back to Washington this week with a lengthy to-do list, and the House is hoping to wrap things up and get out of Dodge.

REPRESENTATIVE JOHN BOEHNER: I've made it clear that the House is going to leave next Friday and you all know me pretty well. I mean what I say and I say what I mean.

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Middle East
7:58 am
Sun December 8, 2013

Foreign Fighters In Syria Raise Fears

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 11:50 am

Foreigners are streaming into Syria to help fight with the resistance. Host Rachel Martin talks to Thomas Hegghammer, director of terrorism research at the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment in Oslo, about the growing concern that foreign fighters could hurt efforts to reach peace.

Music Interviews
7:58 am
Sun December 8, 2013

Bad Religion Celebrates 'Christmas'

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 11:50 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Ah, Christmastime, the season when you and your family gather around the tree, join together in a Christmas carol like this classic.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "HARK! THE HERALD ANGELS SING")

UNIDENTIFIED SINGERS: (Singing) Hark, the herald angels sing, glory to the newborn King. Peace on earth and mercy mild, God and sinners reconciled. Joyful...

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Economy
5:35 am
Sun December 8, 2013

Economists Toast 20 Years Of NAFTA; Critics Sit Out The Party

A truck bearing Mexican and U.S. flags approaches the border crossing into the U.S., in Laredo, Texas.
Reuters /Landov

Twenty years ago, millions of Americans were cocking their ears — waiting to hear a "giant sucking sound."

They feared Mexico would begin vacuuming up U.S. manufacturing jobs as soon as President Clinton signed the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA, on Dec. 8, 1993.

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Movie Interviews
5:34 am
Sun December 8, 2013

Woody Harrelson Does Bad Pretty Good

Tapping into his anger and rage, Woody Harrelson plays the meth-smoking psychopath antagonizing Christian Bale in Out of the Furnace.
Kerry Hayes Relativity Media

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 11:50 am

In the new drama Out of the Furnace, a young man (Casey Affleck) gets involved with a group of criminals and then goes missing. Determined to find him, his ex-con brother (Christian Bale) grabs a shotgun and sets off.

Actor Woody Harrelson, perhaps best known for his role as the bartender on Cheers, steps away from comedy to play a member of that group of criminals, a viscous meth addict and bookie named Harlan DeGroat.

Harrelson spoke with NPR's Rachel Martin about the movie and preparing for a role that required letting loose a lot of anger.

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The Salt
5:34 am
Sun December 8, 2013

Between Pigs And Anchovies: Where Humans Rank On The Food Chain

An animal's ranking on the food chain depends on where its meals place on the ladder. That puts plants on the bottom (they make all their food), polar bears on top and people somewhere between pigs and anchovies.
Lisa Brown for NPR

Originally published on Wed December 11, 2013 10:28 am

When it comes to making food yummy and pleasurable, humans clearly outshine their fellow animals on Earth. After all, you don't see rabbits caramelizing carrots or polar bears slow-roasting seal.

But in terms of the global food chain, Homo sapiens are definitely not the head honchos.

Instead, we sit somewhere between pigs and anchovies, scientists reported recently. That puts us right in the middle of the chain, with polar bears and orca whales occupying the highest position.

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Remembrances
6:33 pm
Sat December 7, 2013

Nelson Mandela: From 'Second-Class Citizen' To World-Revered Leader

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

A great man died two days ago. The world is still mourning. Journalists still haven't run out of things to say, not even close. Because while great men and women die regularly, there's something very, very different about this one.

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NPR Story
5:25 pm
Sat December 7, 2013

How U.S. Activists Helped Push South Africa Away From Apartheid

Originally published on Sat December 7, 2013 6:33 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Growing up when I did, going to high school and college in the '80s and early '90s, I don't think I saw real political activism until I encountered the anti-apartheid movement. My own church sent a busload of congregants to picket the South African embassy. We all felt like we had a moral stake in ending apartheid and freeing Nelson Mandela.

Richard Knight says the anti-apartheid movement helped put pressure on South Africa's white leaders.

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The New And The Next
5:25 pm
Sat December 7, 2013

An 'Accidental Activist,' And England's World Cup Hope

Michael Regan Getty Images

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 3:47 pm

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest discoveries.

This week, Watson tells NPR's Arun Rath about about a rising star in soccer who could turn things around for England in the World Cup, and a Bahraini woman who calls herself an "accidental activist." He also shares a clip from an Ozy interview with President Bill Clinton regarding Nelson Mandela's legacy.

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