World

The New And The Next
5:08 pm
Sat November 30, 2013

Bickering In Bangladesh; Curling; Glow-In-The-Dark Tattoos

Courtesy of Ozy.com

Originally published on Sat December 7, 2013 3:31 pm

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest discoveries.

This week, Ozy deputy editor Eugene Robinson fills in for Carlos to tell NPR's Arun Rath about two dueling divas in Bangladeshi politics, the rising popularity of an obscure winter sport, and tattoos that you can wear to work.

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Religion
5:08 pm
Sat November 30, 2013

New Pope's 'Dream' Includes Tolerance, Compassion And Tradition

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 5:18 pm

This week, Pope Francis released a new document called the "Evangelii Gaudium" (The Joy of the Gospel). His first major document has captured the attention of Vatican watchers, who describe a vision statement of what Francis sees for the future of the Catholic Church.

World
5:08 pm
Sat November 30, 2013

Thousands Of Children As Young As 6 Work In Bolivia's Mines

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 5:16 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Remember those Chilean miners who spent more than two months trapped underground? What if I told you they were the lucky ones?

Many miners in South America work in conditions far more dangerous, and some of them are as young as 6 years old. Their daily travails would shock Charles Dickens. But now, some children in Bolivia are unionizing and asking the government to lower the working age.

Wes Enzinna went into the mines in the city of Potosi to understand why. And he writes about the experience for VICE magazine.

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World
5:08 pm
Sat November 30, 2013

Nairobi Seeks Answers 2 Months After 'Kenya's 9/11'

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 5:15 pm

On Sept. 21, terrorists attacked the upscale Westgate shopping mall in Nairobi, Kenya, killing at least 67 people. Despite early reports of as many as 15 gunmen, Kenyan police now know that the attack was the work of only four terrorist, all of whom died in the suicide mission. But some other very important questions remain unanswered.

Business
5:08 pm
Sat November 30, 2013

Boston Says It Has A Plan To Erase The Gender Wage Gap

It doesn't matter if you're a surgeon, a banker or a fisherman — if you're a woman in the United States, you're probably paid less than a man. That hasn't changed with federal laws or the feminist movement.

But now, Boston thinks it has a solution to completely erase the gender wage gap.

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Science
5:08 pm
Sat November 30, 2013

Putting A Price On 'Dueling Dinosaur' Fossils

What would you pay for a fossil of two complete dinosaurs locked in what seems to be a fight to the death? An auction house put that question to the test with the dinosaurs, discovered in 2006 in the Hell Creek formation of Montana. It got an unexpected answer.

Pop Culture
5:08 pm
Sat November 30, 2013

In The World Of Podcasts, Judge John Hodgman Rules

In addition to Hodgman's work on Judge John Hodgman, he has contributed pieces to This American Life and Wiretap. His most recent book, That Is All, was published in 2011.
Brantley Gutierrez Courtesy of Maximum Fun

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 6:08 pm

Should the kitchen sink's built-in dispenser be filled with dish soap or hand soap?

Can you stop family members from using your childhood nickname?

Is a machine gun a robot?

These are the kinds of pressing decisions before the court on the podcast, Judge John Hodgman.

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History
5:08 pm
Sat November 30, 2013

'Project Unspeakable' Asks The Big Questions

A group of people inspired by a book on the assassination of President John F. Kennedy are creating theater around the idea that his death could have been part of a conspiracy. And the questions don't stop there.

The Two-Way
4:28 pm
Sat November 30, 2013

Paul Crouch, Co-Founder Of Trinity Broadcasting Network, Dies

Paul Crouch during one of his shows on TBN.
YouTube

Paul Crouch, who along with his wife Jan, founded a TV network that went on to become the largest Christian television network in the world, died on Saturday, the network announced.

Trinity Broadcasting Network said it is believed that he died from on-going heart problems. He was 79.

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The Two-Way
3:26 pm
Sat November 30, 2013

AP Poll: 'Americans Are A Mistrustful Bunch'

Most bikers don't trust cars.
Bebeto Matthews AP

Picking up on an interesting finding from the General Social Survey, the Associated Press conducted a national poll on Americans and trust.

The General Social Survey found that the number of Americans who say most people can be trusted has plummeted. Back in 1972, when the GSS first asked the question, half of respondents said most people can be trusted. These days, it's down to one-third.

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The Two-Way
12:52 pm
Sat November 30, 2013

U.S. Offers To Destroy Some Of Syria's Chemical Weapons

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 3:53 pm

The United States has offered to destroy some of Syria's chemical weapons, the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) said in a statement on Friday.

The U.S. plans to destroy the chemicals aboard a U.S. vessel at sea using a process called hydrolysis, in which chemical agents are neutralized using hot water plus other chemicals.

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The Two-Way
11:52 am
Sat November 30, 2013

North Korea Says Detained American Has 'Apologized'

This photo taken on Nov. 9 and released on Nov. 30 by North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency shows American Merrill Newman inking his thumbprint onto a written apology for his alleged crimes both as a tourist and during his participation in the Korean War.
KCNA AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 2:43 pm

North Korea says a U.S. veteran, who has been detained for more than a month, has apologized for committing "indelible crimes against" the country in the past and during his current trip.

The North Korean government released an edited video of 85-year-old Merrill Newman reading a handwritten apology.

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The Two-Way
8:03 am
Sat November 30, 2013

U.S. Urges Commercial Airlines To Comply With New Chinese Air Zone

Japanese Coast Guard vessels sail alongside Japanese activists' fishing boat, not in photo, warning the activists away from a group of disputed islands called Diaoyu by China and Senkaku by Japan.
Emily Wang AP

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 2:42 pm

While saying that it is still "deeply concerned" by China's broadening of its air defense zone, the U.S. State Department urged commercial airlines to abide by the new zone and give Chinese authorities advance notice if they planned to fly over a set of disputed islands in the East China Sea.

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Simon Says
7:31 am
Sat November 30, 2013

Crossing The Sea For Freedom A Familiar Story For Americans

More than 100 Haitians were rescued this week after their crowded sailboat capsized. At least 30 more were reported dead.
U.S. Coast Guard via Getty Images

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 3:33 pm

This week, at least 30 people died when a packed sailboat ran aground and capsized off the coast of the Bahamas. The rest of the migrants on board clung to that splintered boat for hours until the U.S. Coast Guard found them. The survivors are being cared for at a Bahamian military base until they are sent back to the place they risked their lives to leave.

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Books News & Features
7:31 am
Sat November 30, 2013

A London Cabbie's Guide To Lit Gifts

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. No way around it. It's shopping season and for many people there's nothing like giving a book as a holiday gift. A book is not only a fine companion, it reflect something about both the giver and the receiver. And you don't have to change the batteries.

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Sports
7:31 am
Sat November 30, 2013

The Case Against Big Data In Sports

University of Miami professor Robert Plant is starting to wonder if big data is ruining sports. He talks with host Scott Simon about how crunching the numbers is changing — and has already changed — the games we love to watch.

Sports
7:31 am
Sat November 30, 2013

Front-Runners Emerge In NFL Playoff Race

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 10:51 am

Now that Thanksgiving has come and gone, the playoff battle in the NFL is heating up. And in hockey, 10 former players have filed suit against the NHL for failing to protect players from concussions. ESPN's Howard Bryant fills in the details with host Scott Simon.

Theater
5:41 am
Sat November 30, 2013

Around The U.S., Holiday Theater With Local Flair

Seven In One Blow, which plays at New York City's Axis Theater, is one of many recurring holiday-season productions across the U.S. that bring a distinctly local flavor and history to bear.
Dixie Sheridan

Whatever they are, our holiday traditions tend to be a mixture of the universal and the specific.

If we celebrate Christmas, for instance, we might have stockings and trees just like our neighbors, but we might also be the only ones in town who wear homemade elf hats while we open presents. It's a mix that helps us feel closer to the rest of the culture while reaffirming what's special about our own little community, family and home.

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The Salt
5:40 am
Sat November 30, 2013

These Cookbook Photos Redefine What Fresh Seafood Looks Like

How to make dead fish look attractive? That's the challenge New York-based duo Shimon and Tammar Rothstein faced when they were hired to do the photography for famed French chef Eric Ripert's book On the Line.
Photos by Shimon and Tammar, Courtesy of Shimon and Tammar

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 11:05 am

How to make dead fish look attractive? That's the challenge New York-based duo Shimon and Tammar Rothstein faced when they were hired to do the photography for famed French chef Eric Ripert's book On the Line.

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Parallels
5:38 am
Sat November 30, 2013

Crashing An Afghan Wedding: No Toasts But Lots Of Cheesy Music

Afghans hold large, expensive weddings, even those involving families of modest means. More than 600 people attended this recent marriage at a large wedding hall in Kabul.
Sean Carberry NPR

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 6:17 pm

Afghanistan may be one of the world's poorest countries, but weddings are still a big — and expensive — deal. On most weekends, Kabul's glitzy and somewhat garish wedding halls are packed with people celebrating nuptials.

One of them is the Uranos Palace complex. On the night I attended my first Afghan wedding, all three of its halls were overflowing. I was one of two foreigners in a room of about 200 men. The female guests sat on the other side of a 7-foot-high divider in the middle of the hall.

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