World

Parallels
11:18 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Syria's War (The Official Version) Plays Out On TV

Syrian soap opera Wilada min al-Khasira is incorporating current events into its storylines, including tough subjects such as torture and the detention of anti-government protesters. The third season of the popular show begins this week.
Courtesy of Clacket Productions

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 12:31 pm

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Parallels
10:36 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Key Takeaways From Pakistan's Report On Osama Bin Laden

Children walk past the house of former al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden in Abbottabad, Pakistan, on May 8, 2011. A new Pakistani report says the "extent of incompetence" in failing to detect bin Laden despite the size of the house was "to put it mildly ... astounding, if not unbelievable."
Anjum Naveed AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:16 am

We've waded through the 336-page Pakistani report on the circumstances surrounding the killing of Osama bin Laden to find the most interesting bits. As we noted yesterday, it was obtained and published by Al Jazeera.

First of all, it starts more like a novel than a government-commissioned report:

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Mountain Stage
10:18 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Connie Smith On Mountain Stage

Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Country singer Connie Smith makes her second appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live in Bristol, Tenn./Va., in partnership with the Birthplace of Country Music Alliance.

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The Two-Way
10:12 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Residents Heading Home In Blasted Quebec Town

A view from above showing some of the destruction in Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, after Saturday's train derailment, explosions and the fires that followed.
Mathieu Belanger Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 7:35 pm

"A majority of the 2,000 people forced out of their Lac-Mégantic, Que., homes following the massive rail tank-car explosions Saturday morning are being allowed to return home today," CBC News reported Tuesday.

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The Record
8:03 am
Tue July 9, 2013

A Music Festival Grows In The Rainforest

Palsandae, a South Korean troupe, whose wild, very loud music is at times not far removed from the ecstatic free-playing of Sun Ra's Arkestra or the Art Ensemble of Chicago.
Leslie Liew Courtesy of the photographer

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:27 am

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Europe
7:28 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Mr. Darcy Statue Emerges From Hyde Park's Serpentine Lake

The 12-foot statue embodies the character played by Colin Firth in the BBC adaption of Pride and Prejudice. Brits recently ranked his spontaneous swim the most memorable TV drama moment.

The Two-Way
7:15 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Book News: Barnes & Noble's CEO Quits

  • Barnes & Noble CEO William Lynch Jr. resigned Monday following several grim earnings reports and the company's recent announcement that it would stop manufacturing its own Nook tablets. A new chief executive wasn't named, but Michael P. Huseby has been named president of Barnes & Noble and chief executive of the Nook division.
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The Two-Way
7:13 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Egypt's Interim Leader May Tap Emergency Law Used By Mubarak

Egypt's military and the nation's interim leaders say the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi was not a coup, but rather a response to public demand. Morsi's supporters believe otherwise. If it was judged to be a coup, the U.S. might have to cut off aid to Egypt's military.
Ed Giles Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:15 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports from Cairo

With the news still echoing across Egypt that more than 50 people were killed during a protest over the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi, the country's interim leader issued a decree late Monday that gives himself sweeping powers until new elections are held.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
7:10 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Physics And Poetry: Can You Handle The Truth?

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T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965), winner of the 1948 Nobel Prize in Literature
Hulton Archive Getty Images

If you are going to shell out cash sending a kid to college, you might as well get in on their fun too. That's how my daughter's post-modern lit class slammed me into The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot.

It is, arguably, one of the most important poems of the 20th century. At least that is what they told her and that is what my dad told me when he first gave me a copy as a boy. But she had a class that helped her understand the poem. Alone in my study I didn't get it ... again (sorry Dad).

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Critics' Lists: Summer 2013
7:03 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Best Of The Summer: 6 Books The Critics Adore

Andrew Bannecker

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 4:30 pm

There is no one definition of a summer book. It can be a 1,000-page biography, a critically acclaimed literary novel, a memoir everyone is talking about — or it might be your favorite guilty pleasure: romance, crime, science fiction. Whatever you choose, it should be able to sweep you away to another world, because there is nothing like getting totally lost in a book on summer day. Here are a few books that swept away some of our favorite critics.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Tue July 9, 2013

What's Eating Her? A Writer Meditates On Food And Loneliness

iStockphoto.com

These days, it's often noted that food has displaced art, sport and even sex as the literary mind's propulsive muse. The single cookie that launched poor Proust on his interior odyssey feels shockingly modest compared with the vast smorgasbord today's writers seem almost compelled to revel in.

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Author Interviews
6:44 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Comedian Aisha Tyler Talks About Flipping Off Failure

Tyler says as a kid she stood out because of her height, her glasses, and her vegetarian lunches.
Aisha Tyler

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 12:50 pm

Comedian and actor Aisha Tyler brews beer, plays video games, tells dirty jokes, drinks fancy booze and ... writes books.

She has a new one out this week: Self-inflicted Wounds: Heartwarming Tales of Epic Humilation. We sat down in the NPR studios over a mug of 18-year-old scotch to talk about her most embarrassing moments on the road to success. (No, really, we did. Listen to us toast.)

For those of you wondering who Aisha Tyler is, here's a quick breakdown (to be read quickly):

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NPR Story
5:01 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Monday's Bloodshed Hardens Political Divisions

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 5:50 am

Egypt's interim president, who was installed by a military coup last week, issued a plan calling for parliamentary elections next year and giving himself sweeping powers in the meantime. His move came hours after the deadliest clash yet between security forces and supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi.

NPR Story
5:01 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Snowden's Leaks Puts National Security Agency In A Bind

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 6:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

As Larry just said, the Privacy Board can now openly debate NSA surveillance programs, thanks to the revelations from Edward Snowden. And this is just one example of how Snowden's leaks have put the NSA in a bind. To talk more about this we're joined by NPR's justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. Carrie, thanks for coming in.

CARRIE JOHNSON, BYLINE: Thank you.

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NPR Story
5:01 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Companies Cash In On Royal Baby Watch

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 7:18 am

Britain's latest royal may arrive this weekend. Advertising Age reports Harrod's, the venerable British department store, is selling royal baby china. Others getting in on the action: Krispy Kreme is offering doughnuts with pink or blue filling, which color you get is a surprise — just like the baby's gender.

NPR Story
5:01 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Barnes & Noble CEO William Lynch Resigns

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 7:01 am

Lynch's exit comes just two weeks after the bookseller announced it was shelving its goal of becoming a player in the tablet business. Lynch has a tech background, and as CEO focused his attention on the Nook digital business. But the quarter that just ended showed huge losses for the digital devices.

NPR Story
5:01 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Furloughed Pentagon Workers Run For Freedom

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 5:53 am

Some defense workers at the Pentagon, who have been furloughed because of sequestration cuts, are having fun and getting exercise with their extra time off. Renee Montagne and David Greene report on the Federal Furlough Five Mile Run Run For Freedom.

Political Crisis In Egypt
3:48 am
Tue July 9, 2013

What Egyptian State TV Says About The State Of Egypt

In an image from a video broadcast on Egyptian state TV, President Mohammed Morsi addresses the nation on July 2 — his final speech before the military deposed him.
Ismael Mohamad UPI /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 8:23 am

It sounded like a slip of the tongue. As millions of Egyptians took to the streets calling for President Mohammed Morsi to step down, state TV anchor George Heshmat casually used the word "revolution" instead of "protests."

This signaled that state TV was beginning to assert its independence from a government that was never a good fit for it anyway. It was clear that something had changed at the voice of the state — even before Morsi was pushed from power.

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Games & Humor
3:43 am
Tue July 9, 2013

A Zombie Horror Game, Inspired By ... A Nature Documentary?

In The Last of Us, a fungus called Cordyceps that commonly infects insects has jumped over to humans, creating a fungal zombie apocalypse.
Naughty Dog

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:20 am

The Last of Us is a new survival horror video game and it features — no big surprise — zombie-like creatures. But these are not the same old zombies that have dominated movie and TV screens in the past few years.

Neil Druckmann, creative director for The Last of Us, says he wanted a fresh new way to wipe out humanity — and he found it in a BBC documentary series called Planet Earth, which depicts the scary effects of the Cordyceps fungus.

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